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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How has your experience been with rev matching on your chief? I've been finding it rather difficult to rev match consistently if at all. It's almost to the point where I'm overthinking it and it likes getting the "yips" while golfing.

I find my clutch is stiff but manageable, even in gridlock. perhaps it's my gloves which are tight at the webbing between the index and thumb causing loss off propreoception. Perhaps the break lever is just a hair too far away for a consistent grip. My hands are a large glove size.

I just can't seem to get a consistent "blip" on the throttle which doesn't cause that forward jerk or momentary engine break post throttle blip.

I'll try changing gloves (I've had them a very long time and I'm sentimental, but their old and worn).

I've been out purposefully practicing this on long straight stretches of highway.

Anyone have any thoughts on this? What's your experience been when rev matching on your chief?

I think that this is a good topic for everyone in general. I think there was a previous thread on this that was completely derailed. To be clear, I'm talking about a blip (quick roll on/off) on the throttle, following a downshift with express purpose of putting the rpm's within range of the gear being downshifted into to maintain the power in the band, wheel speed and negate engine breaking.

GO...
 

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Cannya twist the lever more forward; out of the way? Find your comfort level. Maybe even try more towards yourself. Leave it loose and when it feels right, tighten! Good riding. Same opposite side for that sweet balanced look.
 

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I've not had an issue with it, as long as I'm paying attention. I've adjusted my throttle response with my PVCX tuner to get it to a point where it fits my riding style well. Maybe one of those would help you? It will do a lot more for you than adjust the throttle--it makes a major difference in how your TS111 bike runs to retune the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@jdmatthew I had not considered a tuner, perhaps that is an option I need to seriously consider.

@WhizzbangK.C. With two fingers on the break leaver, I use my thumb, ring and pinky fingers to blip the throttle.
In my example, I'm in 6th going about 62-63mph. I pull in the clutch, downshift then blip the throttle and let the clutch snap back. Ideally, the last two actions happen together, where the clutch gets let out as the rpms reach their peak of blip.

Perhaps I need to exaggerate the blip, as I seem to have better success when doing this, but it feels awkward and unnatural to do this. I never really had this problem before.
 

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@jdmatthew I had not considered a tuner, perhaps that is an option I need to seriously consider.

@WhizzbangK.C. With two fingers on the break leaver, I use my thumb, ring and pinky fingers to blip the throttle.
In my example, I'm in 6th going about 62-63mph. I pull in the clutch, downshift then blip the throttle and let the clutch snap back. Ideally, the last two actions happen together, where the clutch gets let out as the rpms reach their peak of blip.

Perhaps I need to exaggerate the blip, as I seem to have better success when doing this, but it feels awkward and unnatural to do this. I never really had this problem before.
Ease out on the clutch, don't let it "snap back". This is a large engine with a lot of inertial mass, and if the revs are not PERFECTLY matched you will get a snatch or a jerk if you release the clutch too fast. It is almost impossible to perfectly match revs, so a controlled release on the clutch will allow it to bring the engine and transmission speeds into harmony. That is it's purpose after all. On smaller displacement or lower torque machines the effect is still there but you don't notice it as much. This bike has a big heavy crank shaft and big heavy clutch basket and gears and as such takes longer for everything to catch up, hitting much harder when you snap the clutch back engaged.
 

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This is why I chose to break in the engine hard for the first 500 miles and no clacking going on in my 2016 Dark Horse! None what so ever. I broke my Rune and Valkyrie the same way. British bikes I donthe easy play nice break in. Been lucky or doing something right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So, I changed gloves to another pair I've had lying around. I had almost no problems rev matching. It was almost night and day. All I can say is that the pair of leather gloves I was using was over 15yrs old, worn and warped. I suspect that the tightness around the webbing between the thumb, index finger and palm was giving me a false sense of grip. I must say, i'm embarrassed. I don't know why I didn't think to try changing gloves sooner. But I'd rather share my experience so someone else might benefit.

@WhizzbangK.C. I think I tend to agree with you on clutch action, after all these aren't sport track bikes. However, I tend to feel that it shouldn't be an issue under normal conditions ( not at the track, not pushing limits out on public back roads - although you could argue that is where it's needed most ).

I appreciate everyone's feed back. Thankyou
 

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Revmatching? Unless you're riding a parallel twin or inline 4, with a 14,000 Rpm redline.........I wouldn't worry too much......Hell any bike you can start uphill in 3rd from a dead stop..
 

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Why all the drama to down shift gears? Let bike slow down then shift to a lower gear...........if your trying to race the pig you have bought the wrong tool for the job.
 

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Victory, and to a lesser extent, Indians don't like being bliped. If you blip a Victory too much you will stall it. Personally I roll on the throttle to increase the RPMs, ease out the clutch, then roll off when downshifting. These aren't high rev'ng bikes; slow and steady wins the race.
 
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This is the first big twin I've had and have had the same problem while down shifting. It is so much different than my old inline 4's and 6's. The response isn't as quick but also I think the difference in revs between gears is smaller. I agree with Goatlicker. Slow the process down a bit. It's just retraining my brain that takes some time. But man do I love this bike!
 

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The practice of slowing down by downshifting with too high of revs should only be used in hard braking situations-even if you have to slam down from 6th to 4th gear.nobody should beat up their bike! But you can;
Only if you have too! Two three fingers on the front brake only; Anymore ie: if you grab the brake with your whole hand (It will lock up every time) and 9 out of ten times you and the bike are going down! Take notes people there is a lot of great info here. I only use both brakes at the same time in wet situations! Rubber side down. The wknd is upon us, play nice and do your homework. Check oil tires and gas gauges. Ride safe and have fun.
 

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So I downshift almost every time I slow down. And I usually rev match while doing it. I find that it cuts way back on the amount of braking I need. Is that a wrong practice or is it somehow hard on the bike?
 

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So I downshift almost every time I slow down. And I usually rev match while doing it. I find that it cuts way back on the amount of braking I need. Is that a wrong practice or is it somehow hard on the bike?
Keep up the good work! Perfect practice. Less use of brake less pads to buy. It's a sweet sound 'rev matching' working the motor like you're one with the machine grasshopper! Keep in mind at the lights you've got maybe loose gravel oil drips and moisture from everyone who stopped from their tailpipes-you don't need to be sliding. And at the light stay in gear, for quick maneuvers! (Just in case)! Nice looking Skooter.
 

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One good reason for downshift while slowing down is to keep the bike in the right gear incase you need to accelerate again. I use both front and rear brakes in at least 95% of all my braking and mix downshifting/engine braking in to a small degree.
However, as for how much engine braking, you can let the engine slow you do to a very slow speed, but just remember that brake pads are cheaper and easier to replace than clutches... just saying o_O
 

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One good reason for downshift while slowing down is to keep the bike in the right gear incase you need to accelerate again. I use both front and rear brakes in at least 95% of all my braking and mix downshifting/engine braking in to a small degree.
However, as for how much engine braking, you can let the engine slow you do to a very slow speed, but just remember that brake pads are cheaper and easier to replace than clutches... just saying o_O
Understood. I was just surprised at a couple post on this forum that sounds like it was a bad practice. My first bike was a 650 Yamaha I purchased when I was 16 and I have been rev matching ever since. But also using the brakes similar to what you do. Now with my first big twin it even sounds bad ass on top of it. This is by far the best bike I have had. Although the 82 Honda CBX comes in a fairly close 2nd.
 

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One good reason for downshift while slowing down is to keep the bike in the right gear incase you need to accelerate again. I use both front and rear brakes in at least 95% of all my braking and mix downshifting/engine braking in to a small degree.
However, as for how much engine braking, you can let the engine slow you do to a very slow speed, but just remember that brake pads are cheaper and easier to replace than clutches... just saying o_O
He said he rev matches and that's kool. As the motor slows drop a gear, like double clutching. It's all in the ear. He's doing fine and if you use both brakes that's fine too, me I'm front brake only in less it's an emergency. Again I only use both all the time in the rain or snow. That's how I was trained-caught on and kept the style. Over a million miles (smiles) still yet to mess up a clutch. As long as we feel safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I like the discussion, and I agree that these big bikes are not meant for overly aggressive knee dragging type of riding, but they should be capable of rev matching and trail breaking. If you can race through the gears getting up to speed, you should be able to do the same on the way down.

I think with these big bikes it's a vital skill if you wish to maintain control and get a visceral understanding of and have confidence in what the bike is capable of. I also think it's fine if you ride extremely conservatively where you never have a need to rev match. I think the 111 is more than capable of handling this and if done properly, your riding experience should smooth out a bit and become much more enjoyable.

I bought mine to ride it. I don't baby it or abuse it. I try to work skills every time I ride. These days the rotation is rev matching. Next rotation might be emergency breaking...(not to derail my own thread but I loath emergency break practice with the abs. The sound when the abs kicks in just freaks me out making me think I hit or broke something).
 
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