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I was just reading @Chief Signguru (speedy recovery Chief) review of his Wicked battery, and some of the comments it spurred, and it got me to thinking that there must be some reason that a battery will last so long for some folks, but not for others. So i thought we should get some of everyone's habits all in one place for some pseudo-scientific research. I am sure temperature has to do with longevity, but i wonder about the charging habits, riding habits, geographic location, charger brand/size, etc. i can only get 2 summers out of any battery i buy, so i have resorted to the cheap $50 battery's on ebay. Now that i have this Indian, with all of its electronics and reliance on said electronics, i am not sure i want to trust the el cheapo batteries. But i must be doing something wrong to only get 2 summers on a battery, and that's what i want to figure out. So lets get some of your experiences and maybe we can find a common denominator.
Lets start with these (i will add to the list as i think of more, or more is pointed out):
Year model of bike
Battery brand with which you had the best success
How long did that best battery last
Battery maintainer, ie Battery Tender Jr, etc
Average miles ridden per year
Do you plug it in after every ride
Do you plug in in during the winter
Do you leave it plugged in all winter
Coldest winter temps your battery is exposed to
Hottest summer temps your battery is exposed to
Country and State/Province (or region rather than state if you prefer more anonymity) where the bike resides
Do you take the battery into the house for the winter if the garage is not climate controlled
How often, if ever, do you check battery cable connections
 

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I’ve had good luck with batteries on everything that I’ve left close to factory electronically. What I’m saying is that as long as I haven’t put a ridiculous lighting/stereo system in, the batteries do great! Typically if I’m not going to ride for 30+ days I will plug the bike in. Battery tenders are much cheaper than batteries. I’ve gotten 5 years out of batteries in the past.

I had a Polaris slingshot that was waaaay over the top and it demolished batteries. Cool thing is that those optimum yellow tops also had a pretty good warrantee.
 

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I'm running the "Renegade 530 CCA" battery which I installed in December of 2018 [which was really cold] and so far,so good. However,the motor still cranks over alittle slow meaning, the 20/50W Dino oil I'm using in it is probably alittle too heavy for the cold weather,especially if it's parked out in the elements for any period of time.But once the temp hits the 30* mark,she usually cranks over just fast enough to fire up.
But after reading another gentlemen's post on here regarding " cold weather starting",he suggested using a portable space heater,focusing it on either crank case cover til its' temp reached around the 50* mark [which doesn't really take that long] so I tried it and she cranked over pretty good and fired right up.But as long as it's not left out in the elements for any period of time,like over night in real cold temps[ teens or lower],she'll still fire up.But I also suspect that if ya left that heater on it for alittle longer in the real cod temps,she would probably start even quicker.
Anyways,that's what I've been doing and it's been working.

But I'm sure if I was using that synthetic stuff [which has hardly any body to it,came in the bike,and is recommended] she'd probably crank over faster,whether the case was heated or not.
And because it's cold out,and the motor and the oil are cold,so ya might wanna let it run for atleast 10 minurtes before driving off so the oil can get to where it needs to be.Capishe???
And trial and error is how we learn,and I'm always open to suggestions,no matter how off the wall they may sound,cause sometimes a stupid suggestion can and will solve a problem!! Carry on gentlemen!!
 

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I have a 2017 Chieftan Elite, the battery that is in it now is the original battery from the factory. I keep a battery tender on at all times when it is parked. I may not put the tender on when I first get back from a ride, but after it's cooled down, I plug it in. My bike stays in my shop at home, heated space in the winter. It never gets below 50 in there. I tighten or check my terminals once a month or so. I generally put on around 10,000 miles a year. I'm in Michigan, so it doesn't see extreme heat. I've put all my bikes on battery tenders constantly for years and I've never had battery issues. Seems to work for me.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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I have a 2014 Master Chieftain (added tour pak), the original battery lasted 5yrs 2mths. Installed factory battery last yr.
Bike is under a carport, covered in winter with battery tender connected. Low temps in lower teens. Highs in the high 90's to low 100's. I check the voltage thru the tender cable and if low connect the battery tender before I ride. Don't get to ride much anymore maybe 5 to 6k a yr.
 

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After two batteries in two years I invested in a maintainer. The third battery was probably four years old and needed to be replaced. So I bought a new scoot!
 

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This bike is new to me so can't comment on the battery life. With that said, on the Chieftain and my previous bike (a 2007 Suzuki C90) I plug it into the trickle charger all week long (I typically only ride weekends). I never had a issue with the C90 but I also never kept a battery past 3 seasons. Batteries are cheap, being stuck hundreds of miles from home, not so cheap. I said this in a previous thread about batteries, we spend thousands on shiny parts and performance parts yet complain about spending 100 bucks every 3 years on a battery, seems odd to me. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Once a month i plug it in my battery tender, but we usually get 3 years of battery life here in Southwest Florida.
 

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While you are checking your Challenger's battery , check under your left slip-on for spots of rust and corrosion. It's in direct line of your battery's vent tube. You won't find any sympathy from Indian warranty dept. They think it's where you didn't rinse the soap off you bike.
 

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When it's cold out,or more specifically,during the winter months ,and even during the warm weather months if I'm going away for a couple weeks,I plug my 1.25 Amp "Battery Tender Plus" into the batteries pig tail that came on the bike for that purpose and forget about it til I'm ready to ride it again.And I've been doing this on ALL my bikes.This way,I know the battery will always be up when I'm ready to go!!But then again,if the battery is over 5 years old,then it's time for a new one,period!!
 

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I was just reading @Chief Signguru (speedy recovery Chief) review of his Wicked battery, and some of the comments it spurred, and it got me to thinking that there must be some reason that a battery will last so long for some folks, but not for others. So i thought we should get some of everyone's habits all in one place for some pseudo-scientific research. I am sure temperature has to do with longevity, but i wonder about the charging habits, riding habits, geographic location, charger brand/size, etc. i can only get 2 summers out of any battery i buy, so i have resorted to the cheap $50 battery's on ebay. Now that i have this Indian, with all of its electronics and reliance on said electronics, i am not sure i want to trust the el cheapo batteries. But i must be doing something wrong to only get 2 summers on a battery, and that's what i want to figure out. So lets get some of your experiences and maybe we can find a common denominator.
Lets start with these (i will add to the list as i think of more, or more is pointed out):
Year model of bike
Battery brand with which you had the best success
How long did that best battery last
Battery maintainer, ie Battery Tender Jr, etc
Average miles ridden per year
Do you plug it in after every ride
Do you plug in in during the winter
Do you leave it plugged in all winter
Coldest winter temps your battery is exposed to
Hottest summer temps your battery is exposed to
Country and State/Province (or region rather than state if you prefer more anonymity) where the bike resides
Do you take the battery into the house for the winter if the garage is not climate controlled
How often, if ever, do you check battery cable connections
Year model of bike --- 2017 Roadmaster
Battery brand with which you had the best success -- YUSA
How long did that best battery last -- 4.5 almost 5 yrs
Battery maintainer, ie Battery Tender Jr, etc -- Oltimate 4
Average miles ridden per year - 12,000
Do you plug it in after every ride - yes
Do you plug in in during the winter -yes
Do you leave it plugged in all winter -yes
Coldest winter temps your battery is exposed to - in garage 40
Hottest summer temps your battery is exposed to -- 110
Country and State/Province (or region rather than state if you prefer more anonymity) where the bike resides -- Missouri
Do you take the battery into the house for the winter if the garage is not climate controlled - no
How often, if ever, do you check battery cable connections - once
 

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I haven't had any luck babying batteries. The batteries that have lasted the longest for me (10+ years) have never had a tender and sit in the cold all winter.
I put a tender on the motorcycle last winter and the battery went bad anyway.
If you use it a lot, your going to wear it out sooner than if you drive a couple thousand miles a year.
 

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I've never had battery problems on any of my bikes over many years. I've got two bikes at the moment, a 2018 Springfield DH and a 2008 Kawasaki Versys.

The Kawasaki has a Lithium battery in it - SSB Powersport, about 5 years old. The original battery lasted 7 years. The bike sits in the shed for long periods and I've got a Battery Tender brand tender on it, one designed for lithium batteries. It always starts up easily. If I'm riding it for a few days at a stretch it doesn't have the tender on and it's always OK.

The Springfield gets ridden almost daily and has no problem starting up, but some cold mornings it's obviously turning over more slowly. The bike is mostly parked under the back patio, open to the weather on two sides. If I'm off the bike for more than a week it goes in the shed and onto a tender. The battery was replaced at about 50,000 kms (almost 2 years old) when the regulator/rectifier was playing up and replaced, both under warranty.

We get down to almost freezing where I live on the east coast but rarely get frost. Summer coastal temps will be mid 30s (95f) and heading inland I sometimes ride in stupidly hot 45c (115f).

Both tenders are the up to date type which constantly read the battery and only give it what it needs.
 

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Year model of bike --- 2014 chieftain with Renegade 530 cca battery
Battery brand with which you had the best success -- YUASA
How long did that best battery last -- 9 yrs. on my last Yamaha
Battery maintainer, ie Battery Tender Jr, etc --Battery Tender Plus
Average miles ridden per year - 7k - 10k
Do you plug it in after every ride - no
Do you plug in in during the winter -yes
Do you leave it plugged in all winter -I switch weekly between 3 bikes
Coldest winter temps your battery is exposed to - in garage 50°
Hottest summer temps your battery is exposed to -- 110°
Country and State/Province (or region rather than state if you prefer more anonymity) where the bike resides -- Nebraska
Do you take the battery into the house for the winter if the garage is not climate controlled - no
How often, if ever, do you check battery cable connections - every other oil change
 
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