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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ramping up for some novice wrenching in my small garage. It means additions to my Woodworking shop to include tools, racks, lifts, etc., specific for the Indian Vintage. What is recommended? Metrics, yes, but what? Lift, bench top power tools, etc.? Your help is appreciated.
 

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Tops on my list is a service manual. Shows all the specialty tools. Expensive but something I can't do without. And spanner wrench to adjust rear shock. Seems like you can tear down the whole thing. With the metric allen wrenches in tool kit. My favorites are dad's old world big vice and every air tool known to man.
 

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How much maintenance are you planning on doing? Oil changes and Belt Tension / alignment are about the only normal maintenance items besides checking and lubing various parts. Make sure you have the plastic dip-stick wrench and you're good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How much maintenance are you planning on doing? Oil changes and Belt Tension / alignment are about the only normal maintenance items besides checking and lubing various parts. Make sure you have the plastic dip-stick wrench and you're good to go.
Damn . . . that was easy. Thanks folks. Not as involved re-tooling as I thought. Just planning minor maintenance, as 'jlig' mentioned. Might want to fabricate or modify small brackets and the like, but am ready for that, except any welding.

Are the Indian supplied tools easily handled? Meaning can you get a good grip, or should I look into sturdier, more robust wrenches?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I needed a belt deflection gauge. But it wasn't very expensive. And as mentioned,a spanner for the shock.
Belt deflection gauge? Is that like looking for a pair of fallopian tubes? Am I being baited here? o_O
 

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Tops on my list is a service manual. Shows all the specialty tools. Expensive but something I can't do without. And spanner wrench to adjust rear shock. Seems like you can tear down the whole thing. With the metric allen wrenches in tool kit. My favorites are dad's old world big vice and every air tool known to man.
The 2014-2015 Service Manual (SM)is not very high quality for the high price of approx $160. Several of the pages are coming loose from the binding with minimal use! The Figures/PICs are not very clear, and almost beg you to guess which part they are referencing.
If anyone can show me the ref in the manual for taking the "Hard Bags Off/Install".... Please call me out! Hard to believe that this simple procedure is covered in the Owners Manual, but, not included in the SM.
 

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In addition to above replies, depending on what you intend to do I would have a good set of torx heads, metric sockets, and metric allen wrenches.
 

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In addition to above replies, depending on what you intend to do I would have a good set of torx heads, metric sockets, and metric allen wrenches.
Ahh .... Torx heads. Thanks. Don't have those . . . yet. Anything special in any of the wrenches, like angled, longer length? What torgue wrench(es) would I need?
 

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I think that your best bet is to buy a mechanics tool set. Craftsman puts together some really good basic sets at reasonable prices. As you work on your bike, you will discover which specialty tools that you need for the planned job.
You'll also learn where you need to spend top dollar and where you can save regarding buying tools. Craftsman were the best bang for my buck when I was getting started on my own in the '80s. I still have most of that set.
 

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Extensions for the sockets will need a 3" and universal to remove spark plugs and of course spark plug socket.
I don't have the sizes for the torx handy but there are 3 or 4 that I've used so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think that your best bet is to buy a mechanics tool set. Craftsman puts together some really good basic sets at reasonable prices. As you work on your bike, you will discover which specialty tools that you need for the planned job.
You'll also learn where you need to spend top dollar and where you can save regarding buying tools. Craftsman were the best bang for my buck when I was getting started on my own in the '80s. I still have most of that set.
Thanks. I have fulls sets of Craftsman - standard and metric, with extensions, etc. Love the lifetime warranty, only broke one socket. Have a fairly decent set of stationary and hand power tools (woodworking). Used to wrench on my Hondas and Yamahas, and Sportster, but that was over 8 years ago.

What I don't have is a great set of Allen (metric or standard) or Torx wrenches, or any torgue wrenches. Don't have a lift yet, either (looking at J&S). My wrenching will be basic, nothing elaborate and certainly will not be cracking the case. Probably the most detailed mod. or maint. I do would be an exhaust swap and some lighting changes.
 

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Buy the tools you need when you need them. You can spend a serious amount of money on tools that you will never use. For example, if you get to a point where you need some metric sockets then buy the set which will cover the range to need. If you never get to that point then you will never need them.
 

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Along with what others have said get yourself a long length set of metric allen sockets. One comes in handy for removing the floor board mounts on the right side.
 
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