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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Riders,

I wanted to check-in and see what tire pressure everyone was running. I'm 200lbs and after 30minutes of freeway use my tire pressure is 42/43 front 46/47 rear. I'm thinking of lowering -2 PSI in each tire. Thoughts?
 

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I noticed last year that my tire pressure increased as the tires warmed up.. I just left them as they are.

My reasoning is, in the past 20+ yrs.(big twin years). I checked my tire pressure if they looked low and before long trips.. and it worked fine.. If I'm hitting a lot of hills and curves I may check them.. but I like to push things to my limitation..
 

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Had a couple of chances in the last year or so to chat with a couple of tires reps - Avon & Bridgestone. Both recommended keeping the pressure on the high side for better tire mileage.
 

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sidewall pressure is usually the max. the correct tire pressure is found in the manual. it may also be somewhere on the bike. for chieftain, correct cold tire pressure is 36 front and 41 rear (page 114 manual)
 
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sidewall pressure is usually the max. the correct tire pressure is found in the manual. it may also be somewhere on the bike. for chieftain, correct cold tire pressure is 36 front and 41 rear (page 114 manual)
Yep, don't exceed the max pressure indicated on the sidewall. Just remember, the pressure recommendations in the owner's manual only apply to the originally installed OEM tires. Unless you replace them with the same exact tires, use the sidewall information on the new tires and not the owner's manual information when setting tire pressure.
 

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Yep, don't exceed the max pressure indicated on the sidewall. Just remember, the pressure recommendations in the owner's manual only apply to the originally installed OEM tires. Unless you replace them with the same exact tires, use the sidewall information on the new tires and not the owner's manual information when setting tire pressure.
Not arguing because I am not 100% sure I am correct, but my understanding is that the pressure listed on the sidewall is Maximum PSI and not the suggested psi. If that is correct then inflating tires to that number will cause the tire to exceed the max psi once they warm up.
 

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Not arguing because I am not 100% sure I am correct, but my understanding is that the pressure listed on the sidewall is Maximum PSI and not the suggested psi. If that is correct then inflating tires to that number will cause the tire to exceed the max psi once they warm up.
Also the sidewall indicates max PSI cold. Which means you should check tire pressure prior to riding bike. The tire manufacturer takes expansion into consideration.
For example when I used to work for Nissan most of their cars recommended 29 PSI in the front and 26 PSI in the rear. The front requiring more air because of the weight of the engine up front. The max tire pressure on the sidewalls were usually 35 PSI. The manufacture knows the vehicle best and that's why it is advised to follow their pressure requirements.


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My TPM is right on the money. Cold pressure is 36/41. After 10 miles it's 42/47. I'm reasonably sure that running tire pressure "on the high side" will wear the center of the tire faster. Under inflation will wear the edges faster. I believe it's best to run the pressure suggested in the manual.
 

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Like oil and tire selections debates, air pressure recommendations can also be a controversial topic. Let's say your sidewall states 44 psi max and your owner's manual says 36 psi is recommended. You can still fill your tires to 44 psi, just don't exceed it. As mentioned, the manufacturer takes into consideration increased temperatures and pressures once the tire is hot. Over or under-inflated tires can cause poor handling characteristics and worse, tire failure or an accident.

So, to clarify, if the max tire pressure stated on the sidewall for your installed tire says 44 psi and the owner's manual recommends 36 psi, any number between 36 and 44 is acceptable. Do not go any higher or any lower. You can fine-tune the pressure between those two numbers if you desire for your specific riding style. However, if you're like most of us, a safe pressure is all that's required and we probably won't notice any difference in a couple psi.
 

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Hey Riders,

I wanted to check-in and see what tire pressure everyone was running. I'm 200lbs and after 30minutes of freeway use my tire pressure is 42/43 front 46/47 rear. I'm thinking of lowering -2 PSI in each tire. Thoughts?
Yup, Cold tire pressure is the safest. Tire pressure always rises after riding due to friction and tempeture. Unless its 5 degrees out of course.
 

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Seems that the TPM gives us one more thing to worry about. On older bikes I checked the cold pressure and then rode on without a worry what it would be as the tire heated up. Now that we can monitor it we worry whether it is good to have the pressure rise.......

The 36/41 works well and if I start with lower cold tire pressure the bike does not seem to handle as well. The manufacturer knows the pressure will rise and has taken that into account. Just my thoughts....
 

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I prefer to use helium. It helps me glide over the pot holes here in NY


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Yes it does but helium has bad side effects, when your riding in a group and they all use helium and you get off your bikes to fill up and you all sound like Donald Duck people laugh at you. That's embarrassing.
 

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I set my tires to 36 front, 41 rear. My TPMS is pretty dang close. Once I set my pressure, I don't give it another thought other than to check the TPMS from time to tome during a ride to make sure the pressure isn't dropping. I don't care if it goes higher as I know the tires are designed to take the pressure.
 

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You know the sticker on your bike with all the bike's informaiton - the correct cold tire pressure for each wheel is identified. Yes, the pressure will increase as it heats up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You know the sticker on your bike with all the bike's informaiton - the correct cold tire pressure for each wheel is identified. Yes, the pressure will increase as it heats up.
Really? I didn't know that. No need to be sarcastic guy. I just wanted to see what everyone else was doing. It's not always wise to go off of manufacturer recommendations. Though most times it is.
 

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Hey Riders,

I wanted to check-in and see what tire pressure everyone was running. I'm 200lbs and after 30minutes of freeway use my tire pressure is 42/43 front 46/47 rear. I'm thinking of lowering -2 PSI in each tire. Thoughts?
My cold tire pressures are 39 front, 41 rear. After 30 min of riding on the slab at 70 +, my tire pressures are right in the neighborhood of what you experienced. Personally, I would not reduce the pressure.
 

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Yup, Cold tire pressure is the safest. Tire pressure always rises after riding due to friction and tempeture. Unless its 5 degrees out of course.
Actually you still would see a pressure increase at 5 deg if you were out riding. Driving my cage on the freeway even when It's 20 below zero outside, I'll see a 2 to 4 pound increase in pressure.
 
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