Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Rider
Joined
·
548 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It has been suggested we need a fresh thread to talk about. Here is my toughest dilemma while touring: I experienced a flat rear tire on my 1300 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe in Rawlings, WY on Memorial Day of 2014. Walked out of Penny’s Diner after having lunch on my way to SLC. Obviously nothing was open other than the big box stores. Wasn’t even sure there was a motorcycle dealership in the town, let alone a Yamaha dealership. A couple pulled into the dirt parking lot and offered assistance. The gentleman said there was a Yamaha dealership in town. His wife said her brother had a towing service. 20 minutes later, a flatbed tow truck was there and we delivered my bike to the dealership. There was a hotel next to the diner and I got a room. Next morning I was at the dealership when the owner arrived. I explained the situation. He said he dealt with dirt bikes mostly. After checking his inventory, no tire to fit my bike. He called a dealership in Laramie (an hour and a half away) and they had a tire. He sent his only mechanic in his pickup truck to get the tire. Was back by 11:30 am. Owner changed the tire himself and I was on the road by 1 pm. His charge was very reasonable. All in all, I was very fortunate. 👍

This picture was taken JUST before I discovered I had hit a jagged piece of steel that was protruding from the gravel parking lot with my rear tire. You can tell because I am still smiling in the picture. 🤣

BCE4BFF9-47C8-445F-986F-AF9565890405.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
It has been suggested we need a fresh thread to talk about. Here is my toughest dilemma while touring: I experienced a flat rear tire on my 1300 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe in Rawlings, WY on Memorial Day of 2014. Walked out of Penny’s Diner after having lunch on my way to SLC. Obviously nothing was open other than the big box stores. Wasn’t even sure there was a motorcycle dealership in the town, let alone a Yamaha dealership. A couple pulled into the dirt parking lot and offered assistance. The gentleman said there was a Yamaha dealership in town. His wife said her brother had a towing service. 20 minutes later, a flatbed tow truck was there and we delivered my bike to the dealership. There was a hotel next to the diner and I got a room. Next morning I was at the dealership when the owner arrived. I explained the situation. He said he dealt with dirt bikes mostly. After checking his inventory, no tire to fit my bike. He called a dealership in Laramie (an hour and a half away) and they had a tire. He sent his only mechanic in his pickup truck to get the tire. Was back by 11:30 am. Owner changed the tire himself and I was on the road by 1 pm. His charge was very reasonable. All in all, I was very fortunate. 👍

This picture was taken JUST before I discovered I had hit a jagged piece of steel with my rear tire that was protruding from the gravel parking lot. You can tell because I am still smiling in the picture. 🤣

View attachment 613580
Just goes to show, there are still some great people in this world!
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
599 Posts
That s one worry when going on long trips. Is stuff breaking and not finding a repair shop close by that will work on an Indian. Granted these bikes are extremely low maintenance, but if your loaded down for a looooong trip you don’t have room for many tools, and if you need a part, well you are screwed if their isn’t a dealership nearby. Luckily, I’ve had my CDH for 4 years and it hasn’t broken down yet! I feel extremely confident in this bike!
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
I carry a small tool kit,a GOOD tire plug kit,a digital tire gauge,and a small hand tire pump,in my saddle bags,"JUST IN CASE" ,and have been doing so since motorcycles started using tubeless tires.But I have only had to use it once on my own bike,but used it quite a few times to plug a bike tire for some poor soul I've come accross in my travels.And a simple thank you was all that was required.However,if I had a dime for every bike I came across on the side of the road with a flat tire [9 outta 10 times,it's just a small nail or screw they picked up] I'd probably be a wealthy man!!lol lol And they all tried to pay me, but I wouldn't take their money,instead,telling em to pay it forward.In other words,I just did them a good deed so now they can repay me by doing the same for another poor soul stuck on the side of the road.And if everyone did that,what a great world this would be to live in.Dave!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,451 Posts
Not really "touring", per se:

The wife and I had ridden from Ansbach to Grafenwoher to attend a going away dinner for a couple of my CVMA buddies. We took the back roads to get there, but going home the wife decided that she would rather get home faster, so we took the Autobahn. It was lightly raining, so the road was wet, but I wasn't too worried as I have ridden in the rain many times.

We had just finished the on-ramp, and I had accelerated to 120KPH. As we were traveling, I noticed a rectangular patch on the road in front of me, about two bike-lengths long, and spanning the lane that I was in. Before I could do anything, we hit it.

Now, German roads are extremely slick when wet. Whatever they used to patch the 'bahn...it was slicker. As soon as both tires hit the patch, the whole bike started wobbling back and forth...think Harley Death Wobble, but with BOTH tires. Fortunatly, it only lasted a few seconds...long enough to come out the other side of the patch....but for a second, I was envisioning us sliding down the Autobahn at 120KPH...
 
  • Like
Reactions: TerryJ

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
How 'bout getting up close and personal with a bison? No we aren't the stupid tourists you see trying to take a selfie with them. My husband and I were riding through Yellowstone late in the day on the northern side, where the herds are, headed to the NE gate and our reservation at the Grizzly Lodge on Beartooth Highway (fantastic cabins, check them out). Of course that time of day is when the herds are on the move. We came up on some bison crossing the road (slowly). My husband (leading) made it through (they had paused). But when I got up to the same location I was bike to face with a bison who had decided to continue the crossing. He just looked at me and stood there partially in the road. I have great respect for these magnificent beasts, but we still had a ways to go and we were losing light. So I took a deep breath and did what I do with the buggies in Amish country; I gave him a wide berth and went around him with only slight acceleration so as not to spook him. I made it through safely. As soon as I passed he continued his cross. Pretty sure he was a male bison; as it turns out he was just being quite the gentleman.
 

·
Founding member / distinguished
Joined
·
2,706 Posts
I’ve blown a tire, run off the road (slick spot), encountered hail and butthead drivers, but the most memorable trouble was a my buddy’s broken clutch cable.
in 2017, four bikes and a chase Yukon left Pensacola for the Indian Rally on Indian Point in Branson, MO. In Livingston, Alabama, Keith snapped the clutch cable at a gas stop. The local deputy was there (only one on duty - Livingston, AL has about 4000 people in it) and volunteered his help.
The deputy called his cousin who had bikes and word spread and pretty soon the entire town was mobilized to see the Indian motorcycles at the gas station (one of which is broken and can you help?) and wave to the bikers.
Keith and the chase truck went to Meridian, MS to get a trailer and the rest of us were introduced to Dandy Don’s lunch counter which features a “Crackburger” that is so good, you just can’t get enough. Dandy Don’s is at the old Texaco Station.
We had such a fun afternoon, that I still go back to Dandy Don’s for a crackburger at least once a year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,435 Posts
Having broken down many times in many different places and with many different vehicles over the years, I have found that small towns are much better places to be broken down than big cities. In small towns, the people are generally friendlier, for one thing. Also they are more aware of their reliance on their neighbors for survival and so are much more in tune with who to contact for a given need than city folks are. (Some people think small town folks are "self sufficient", but I believe it's actually the opposite and they know and value the skills of those around them to help everyone live a better life.) Small town people all seem to "know a guy" who can get done whatever it is you need, even on weekends, holidays, and after hours. City people often don't have any idea what anyone else around them even does for a living, and also seem to not even care what they could do to better the lives of those around them.
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
2019 Roadmaster matte black and gray
Joined
·
3,011 Posts
Was on a 750 mile trip with my buddy through California, Oregon and Nevada. We were riding his two Yamaha cruisers.
200 miles in, we had just done a section of straight road (way over the posted limit ). We turned right, with only 30 miles left to our determined first dinner/ camping spot in the middle of nowhere.

Immediately after the turn, at about 45 mph, the rear wheel locked up. Somehow, I kept it upright and got it to the shoulder. Scared the $h!t out of both of us.

Called a tow, who brought us 90 minutes back to Klamath falls, Oregon. The one motorcycle shop owner in town came back after hours and had us back up and going on 30 minutes. One of the brake caliper bolts had come off, and the caliper rotated, jamming against the disk. One spare bolt from his parts bin, and we were good to go. He even checked all the fluids, and then tried to only charge 30 bucks. Gave him more, as he saved or trip and went above the call.

After a cold night camping in a church parking lot, we continued on an altered course through reno for street vibes festival.

Though this was 2 years ago, I still shudder to think about what would have transpired if that rear wheel had locked up at the ludicrous speed we had ben traveling just prior to that turn....but it still goes down as my favorite road trip.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
Back before I had switched to big cruisers, I had a Kawasaki Z1-R. One day, on the way to work, as I moved from the west-bound Long Island "Distressway" onto the off-ramp at Rt. 110, I suddenly found myself doing the uphill cloverleaf like a flat tracker. Rear wheel all the way outboard, front wheel at full left lock, and rear tire churning. Somehow I kept my feet on the pegs and brought the back wheel behind me again, with light throttle. To a bystander it might have appeared that I was as skilled as Kenny Roberts, going sideways around a turn. In reality I was just super lucky and somehow managed to not dump it. But after I finished the cloverleaf and proceeded over the bridge, southbound, suddenly it happened again! I went sideways toward a red light on the downhill side of the bridge. Again providence was shining on me and I got it stopped, still upright, without going into the traffic that was crossing the road ahead.
The cloverleaf off-ramp and southbound right lane of Rt 110 was covered in fuel! Probably an overloaded truck or some vehicle with an open fuel port had lost gallons on the roadway. I don't recall if I had to change my skivvies that morning, but do remember getting to work still bug eyed.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
Try driving your scooter thru ice and snow,amongst every thing else nature can throw at ya..I did it for 35 years traveling to and from the garage I worked out of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
Not touring but on a day trip with my buddy for a 3 hour trip to Nags Head for lunch and a few hours of riding down HWY 12. Those around here know what I am talking about. The final 40 miles of Hwy 64 east of the Alligator River is nothing but swamp and very deep ditches on both sides of the road always filled with water/ snakes/ bears/ turtles/ fish and just about every other form of wildlife. I have always worried about what to do if either of us break down in that stretch and we make that run quite a bit. We did not break down, but on the way back on Labor Day a few years ago, a huge black bear walks out of the woods and stands at the edge of the highway just before we get there. As I rode by I could literally have reached out and slapped his nose he was so close. It all happened before I realized it and as soon as we passed I looked in the mirror to see him staring at me like a lot of folks did when I was on my decked out F6B. I think we both startled each other. I hate to think what would have happened if he had taken one more step before stopping.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
Your post is just one more reason "WHY" I use the "Animal Warning Devices" [which are relatively inexpensive] on ALL my vehicles.They may not be 100% efficient when it comes to these critters,[so far,so good] but I'll take any and every "ADVANTAGE" I can get,"ESPECIALLY" when on two wheels.WHY?? Cause YOU will be the "LOSER" every single time should you tag one of these critters!!
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,148 Posts
Laid bike down in Fort Bragg, CA.
Twisted the trailer hitch 90 degrees, and luckily only twisted the front brake controls & grip.
Local guy fixed the hitch and grip for $50.00. Great guy!
Should have went hospital. Spent 2 day in hotel room recovering to the point where we could ride again.
Both me and the Missus whole right sides hurt so bad we could barely walk or raise our arms.
Ended up hoteling most of the way back to Sturgis, (this was a camping road trip). Stayed in Sturgis, SD for a few days recovering some more.
Ended up having to ride all the way back to WI in one day because we could find a hotel or camping.
 

·
Bronze Member
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Going back to 1971 here, after getting back from Nam in early 71 bought a 71 CB750 for a six month tour. Out in the middle of nowhere in Utah the chain had no adjustment
left in it, flopping around like bacon on a grill. Finally made it into Provo, Utah where thank god there was a Honda dealer. A couple of hours later I was back on the road.
I still remember that day.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,799 Posts
Julie and I were tooling thru Yellowstone when we came across a “bear jam.” This guy was why. This was late spring and this guy was working his way down the side of the road, mowing down the grass like he was a cow. Everybody else was in a cage and had some sheet metal between them and him. Not us of course and we had vehicles jammed up behind and in front of us. Fortunately he had zero interest in us. What really concerned us was that he was young enough that Mama could’ve been nearby. He was mebbe two arm lengths away when I took this pic.

613706
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
A group of us planned to fly to Rapid City, rent bikes, and tour the Black Hills, Beartooth Pass, Yellowstone, etc. One guy had to drop out and we were looking for someone to take his place. One of the guys had a semi-acquaintance that rode and he was interested in going. What a mistake... very poor rider and the mountains and turns ate him up on day 1. By the morning of day 2, he’d dropped the rental bike three times. With a little frank talk from the group, he decided to fly home. Thank the Lord...there‘s no way he would have finished the trip and it would have ruined it for everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Back in '94, me and a buddy went down to Daytona for Bike Week. We decided it would be a good idea to ride over to Orlando and visit Sea World. Had a blast, but failed to take the FL weather into account (if you don't like it, give it a minute, it will change).

Heading back to DB on I4, started storming like God's Holy Wrath. Whole nine yards, pouring buckets, thunder, lighting. And of course we didn't bring the rain gear.

About midway back, a bolt of lightning struck literally right between his bike and mine, just off to the left of us. Never knew lightning could be so blinding when it's up close and personal. Scared the ever lovin' crap out of us! Managed to stay upright, made the rest of the way back, but holy crap!

I've been all over the country, in all kinds of weather, wrecked a few times, etc. But that was absolutely the most memorable mishap I ever had on two wheels.

Back before I had switched to big cruisers, I had a Kawasaki Z1-R. One day, on the way to work, as I moved from the west-bound Long Island "Distressway" onto the off-ramp at Rt. 110, I suddenly found myself doing the uphill cloverleaf like a flat tracker.
Weird, grew up just a few miles up the road from there. The "diesel spill" issue was pretty common around there, made for interesting riding. Glad you kept the rubber down.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top