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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm not asking about your dealer or it people (service or sales) here. I am talking about the physical shop. Good or Bad responses are OK.

What it about your dealers service shop that catches your eye?

What feature about your dealers service shop that is most memorable to you?

Do the service techs have uniforms? What can you tell me about their uniforms? (colors, patches, etc.)

What makes you feel the most comfortable when you visit the shop area? (not the people or a specific tech)

Do you care what the service department or the techs look like?
 

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MotorCity Motorcycles has a very clean and straight forward showroom. The clothing accessories are pleasantly interspersed with the 4 or 5 bikes in the showroom. The desks are off towards the entrance. The walls are even and not cluttered with accessories like the local HD dealership. I swear that HD place is like a hoarders hallway.

The uniforms are simple brand style button up shirts, professional and respectful.

I feel invited to sit on the bikes and can see the accessories clearly to be able to make my decision without stress.

The Service Dept is a dream of a garage workspace.

Did I say that the local HD dealership looks like an intervention is needed so Great Aunt Matilda won't get stuck in the back room?
 
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Tucson Indian Service Shop - every time I look in it, it has a few trade in bikes they are cleaning on. Have not seen a broken down Indian in there. It is a small shop and new dealership, so the service shop isn't pretty, but it is functional. Scott is their main Mechanic, a good guy and he takes good care of my bike. Ordered a warranty item without my asking, he noticed it, and took care of it (kickstand chrome flaking). I really liked that, it shows me he cares about my bike. The whole gang wear's the same shirts. Black with Indian Logo and Name. They look sharp. The dealership is always clean and comfortable, with some really good looking Indians! As far as caring what the service shop looks like, I am more concerned about how they take care of my bike, as long as it's not a disaster and my bike won't get damaged, I'm good.

On a side note, I often want to ask Scott if he feels like the Maytag Repair Man, never any repairs to make!

Sorry, just read your post again and I see you arn't asking about the people, I am sure you have your reason's, but I think the most important thing is the people who take care of my bike do a very good job and I am treated right. Don't really care what the shop looks like.
 

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Oakville Ont shop is clean, bright, nice lifts and super techs and service manager. Really helpful if you do your own work too.
 

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I've been in 3 different Indian dealers. They all have the same displays, lounge, etc, just laid out to fit into the space they have in the showroom (all a bit boring). Only got a good look at Indian of Charlotte's Service Dept it's modern, well lit, clean and well laid out. Techs wear uniforms (all the staff wear Indian/Victory button up, collared shop shirts). Of the buildings Charlotte has the most modern looking style/design but all the buildings look nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What would you guys like to see (physically) when you walk into the Service Department? What would make you feel more comfortable?
 

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What would you guys like to see (physically) when you walk into the Service Department? What would make you feel more comfortable?
Well, when I had walked into my local dealerships service area, I must admit that the season here in Michigan had ended and it was lunch time, so the only bike being worked on, on a lift, was a 39'. They had a very clean (OCD kind of clean) workshop and off to the corner were two bikes that were stripped down and awaiting custom paint.

It seemed nice and large with room to grow more work stations. The store manager, Jeff, told me that they just don't need to have a lot of stations because the only real work they do there is prepping new deliveries. He just does not see a lot of "Fix-it" work.

It gave me quite a lot of confidence about my purchase.

I dream about a work station like that in my homes garage.
 

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I'm not asking about your dealer or it people (service or sales) here. I am talking about the physical shop. Good or Bad responses are OK.

What it about your dealers service shop that catches your eye?

What feature about your dealers service shop that is most memorable to you?

Do the service techs have uniforms? What can you tell me about their uniforms? (colors, patches, etc.)

What makes you feel the most comfortable when you visit the shop area? (not the people or a specific tech)

Do you care what the service department or the techs look like?
I can tell ya what that shop had better look like.
Button down tight and squared away.

The jacks had better have load capacity on them.
All flammables stored in a fire cabinet.
Every container that has fluid in it had better be labeled.
Drums had better be sitting on spill dollies.
All light sockets better have solid grounds and any near water better have ground fault sockets.
All grinding wheels, like bench grinders had better have shields adjusted to within 1/8th inch of the wheel.
All grinders better be mounted to the floor and have safety shields installed.
All employees had better be wearing personal protective equipment like safety glasses and face shields.
Fire extinguishers mounted at eye level with no obstructions in front of them and they had better be tagged and not expired.

Builder, I'm just getting started on the list and that shop ain't even turned the first wrench yet.

What I'm outlining here is the ability to pass an OSHA Audit....honest and I really ain't even got started yet.

Then ya got EPA compliance....let's talk about battery storage, storm water run off, waste oil tanks....on and on it goes.

Ok, whew, enough of all of that...right?
Hell no.
We finish those two lists then we can start on local fire and building codes and oh yeah, permits. Like business licenses and occupational place licenses.

All before the first wrench is turned.

I walk into a place and look around to decide if I want to let them work on my bike or convince them they need to hire me to get them compliant before they are hit with thousands of dollars worth of fines.

Seriously now, if a place can't get "legal" it speaks to the commitment of the owners and managers.
I can stand in the doorway and tell ya if the place passes the sniff test.

People that gripe about dealership service rates have no idea of the cost of government regulation compliance. It is a cottage industry onto itself.
 

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I can tell ya what that shop had better look like.
Button down tight and squared away.

The jacks had better have load capacity on them.
All flammables stored in a fire cabinet.
Every container that has fluid in it had better be labeled.
Drums had better be sitting on spill dollies.
All light sockets better have solid grounds and any near water better have ground fault sockets.
All grinding wheels, like bench grinders had better have shields adjusted to within 1/8th inch of the wheel.
All grinders better be mounted to the floor and have safety shields installed.
All employees had better be wearing personal protective equipment like safety glasses and face shields.
Fire extinguishers mounted at eye level with no obstructions in front of them and they had better be tagged and not expired.

Builder, I'm just getting started on the list and that shop ain't even turned the first wrench yet.

What I'm outlining here is the ability to pass an OSHA Audit....honest and I really ain't even got started yet.

Then ya got EPA compliance....let's talk about battery storage, storm water run off, waste oil tanks....on and on it goes.

Ok, whew, enough of all of that...right?
Hell no.
We finish those two lists then we can start on local fire and building codes and oh yeah, permits. Like business licenses and occupational place licenses.

All before the first wrench is turned.

I walk into a place and look around to decide if I want to let them work on my bike or convince them they need to hire me to get them compliant before they are hit with thousands of dollars worth of fines.

Seriously now, if a place can't get "legal" it speaks to the commitment of the owners and managers.
I can stand in the doorway and tell ya if the place passes the sniff test.

People that gripe about dealership service rates have no idea of the cost of government regulation compliance. It is a cottage industry onto itself.
Can tell, you haven't seen Reno's service shop, talk about disaster ,Fork lifts about running me over at the cust counter, firing up brand new snow mobiles right next to the check in counter with the smoke so thick we couldn't see each other, one side of counter to other, huge piles of boxes full of new parts, willy nilly stacked right by door in. The service manager looks like he's in a grunge band, huge beard, beanie cap no uniform just a dirty shirt with Polaris on it. Guy gives me my bike back, and I'm asking about the plug hanging out where the side cover should be, another ten min while they search for the cover in the back.
 

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In Sydney (Aust) they run an Indian/Victory dealership... Just one dealership to service a city of 5 million. It's pretty professionally set out,,, I suspect it follows a standardised "Polaris" format, but I haven't been to any others. There are a couple of turntables with maybe ten Indians and 15 Victories on display. The Sales and Tech guys wear black uniforms with logos, creating a good impression. The coffee is free. There was a strong farty smell in the Thunder Box, but I suspect that Big Roger had only just vacated it. In fact I rode in Big Roger's slipstream for a few miles on the way home, and the smell lingered.... So it must have been him. My advice to the dealership is to lock the dunny door when large obese customers appear.
 

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>>" My advice to the dealership is to lock the dunny door when large obese customers appear."<<

Hey wait a minute there, I resemble that remark.
Ya lock that door on us and the alternative ain't real pretty.
Think riding behind a cattle truck.

 

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I can tell ya what that shop had better look like.
Button down tight and squared away.

The jacks had better have load capacity on them.
All flammables stored in a fire cabinet.
Every container that has fluid in it had better be labeled.
Drums had better be sitting on spill dollies.
All light sockets better have solid grounds and any near water better have ground fault sockets.
All grinding wheels, like bench grinders had better have shields adjusted to within 1/8th inch of the wheel.
All grinders better be mounted to the floor and have safety shields installed.
All employees had better be wearing personal protective equipment like safety glasses and face shields.
Fire extinguishers mounted at eye level with no obstructions in front of them and they had better be tagged and not expired.

Builder, I'm just getting started on the list and that shop ain't even turned the first wrench yet.

What I'm outlining here is the ability to pass an OSHA Audit....honest and I really ain't even got started yet.

Then ya got EPA compliance....let's talk about battery storage, storm water run off, waste oil tanks....on and on it goes.

Ok, whew, enough of all of that...right?
Hell no.
We finish those two lists then we can start on local fire and building codes and oh yeah, permits. Like business licenses and occupational place licenses.

All before the first wrench is turned.

I walk into a place and look around to decide if I want to let them work on my bike or convince them they need to hire me to get them compliant before they are hit with thousands of dollars worth of fines.

Seriously now, if a place can't get "legal" it speaks to the commitment of the owners and managers.
I can stand in the doorway and tell ya if the place passes the sniff test.

People that gripe about dealership service rates have no idea of the cost of government regulation compliance. It is a cottage industry onto itself.
whoa Big Daddy!!!! I love your posts but easy on my fire inspector buddies their guidance is given (NFPA OSHA BUILDING CODES) and needs to be follows because fools be fools and ALL of it is there as a reactive measure of people. God Bless
 
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whoa Big Daddy!!!! I love your posts but easy on my fire inspector buddies their guidance is given (NFPA OSHA BUILDING CODES) and needs to be follows because fools be fools and ALL of it is there as a reactive measure of people. God Bless
True dat.
It truly is a reactive measure of "the people" combined with opportunistic politicians.
They never let an excuse to pass a new law into existence slip past them.
No catastrophe is wasted.
Layers and layers added year after year until the cumulative is strangling oppressive.

I realize that what I am saying here portrays a line as fine as the division between Saturday night and Sunday morning.
It can probably be best illustrated by a true life story from the files of Big Daddy's Crime Story.
Ya know, I can't pass up the opportunity to tell a story. lol

Our drama opens to find a young family man sitting on his back porch drinking coffee in the warm sun of a Saturday morning.
Suddenly a stranger wearing an orange vest bounds over the board privacy fence into the yard. This interloper walks calmly to the gas meter, passing the wand of his "sniffer" over the meter. As quickly as the stranger entered the yard he disappears over the fence and into the neighbors yard. The working stiff dismisses this activity as gas company maintenance and goes back to his coffee and newspaper.

Two hours later a gas company truck pulls up in front of the modest neighborhood row house. Two gas company employees come through the side gate, armed with pipe wrenches. In 5 minutes they have our heroes gas meter seized and stashed in the back of their truck. When questioned they would only respond with gruff grunts and shrugs of their shoulders "We are only doing our job"

That night the temperature dropped below freezing. Yes, that does happen in Houston Texas. Our working class hero huddled with his wife and five kids in front of an electric space heater to keep from being froze to death. They laughed and made it like a camping trip there in the living room.....One of those "family moments" that will forever be burned into the memory of the kids....they laughed and played it off. But they would talk of it years later....not a positive impression moment in child rearing.

Sunday morning found them on their knees in church...then the mall...then the movies...then out to eat. None of them wanted to go back to that cold house to spend another shivering night....A motel was not in the budget. Besides, he didn't want living in a cheap motel in the child's memories....ya know?

Monday morning rolls around to find them wondering if there was a "billing problem" because the wolf always found his way to their door when there was more month than money. They were young and struggling but trying to do right. The lady at the gas company tells them that a leak was found at the meter....and to call a licensed plumber...he would know what to do...goodbye.

Two hours later, when our hero is supposed to be at work, he gets the news from the plumber. A city permit has to be pulled and a pipe has to be run from the meter to the house. Before the gas company will bring the meter back a city inspector has to sign off on the repair....no problem.....oh yeah, the ENTIRE house has to be brought up to code before the city inspector will sign off on the permit....really?

The plumber walks through the home....A 1950's ranch house. That beautiful in-the-wall ceramic space heater in the bathroom has to go....remember those? There are also capped off gas jets in every room for space heaters that were used before the central heat and A/C was installed....no dice....Wife's antique Chambers gas range had to go....and oh yeah, that gas hot water heater out in the garage had to be raised 18 inches off the floor.

Total cost to get the meter put back? Four nights shivering and $9,500.00

The following week end finds our hero working on his motorcycle over at "Uncle Bob's". Bob was an old school biker that lived in a one car garage located in an industrial park. He had a little hobby shop that kept a lot of broke bikers on the road. You could go over there with your parts, a cooler of beer and a couple of joints, and Bob would let you use his tools and shop, even lend a hand. There was never any talk about money but you knew he was hanging by a thread and he knew you were hanging by a thread....No way in the world could you ever constipate this up into a "business". Before ya left ya turned your pockets inside out. If ya didn't have any money then you could just bring him something later....something. See, we are talking grey market, off the books economy here.

Uncle Bob and our hero are sitting on the bed, hot boxing a joint, in the little one room "office" that constituted Bob's residence. A bed in the corner and a makeshift shower stall and toilet. That's how Bob lived. The industrial park consisted of a row of "for rent" one car garages that were home to Mexican upholstery and body shops. Not much more than a dingy collection of shady characters trying to fly under the radar and maintain radio silence. Folks just scraping by, living hand to mouth.....but working, not stealing and not drawing a penny of government money.

They stepped out into the afternoon sun of the driveway where they were met by two "government men". City Building Inspectors. The Inspectors told them that they could survey the shop "voluntarily".....or the cops might like to know about the weed smoking that they smelled.

That afternoon Uncle Bob got $13,600.00 worth of fines from everything like a torch set without a permit to residence of a commercially zoned building.....welding machine, makeshift paint booth, parts washer....oh yeah, they missed nothing and they cut no breaks.

Uncle Bob gets evicted. All of his tools and equipment seized for sale at auction...and he is now homeless and on the street. It took a couple of weeks to play out, but make no mistake, it did play out.

Exactly two weeks pass and a freak winter thunderstorm hit Houston. Lightening strikes the neighbors tree and a limb falls into the backyard. Our heroes wife calls him at work in a panic. The kids will be home from school in an hour and the limb took down a power line....in the backyard.

They always tell you to call the power company for downed lines....right? They even put a little smiley face on this program to ensure compliance. So our hero tells his wife to call the power company and report it....oh yeah, and keep the kids inside.

The power company shows up and pulls the electric meter from the side of our heroes home. See, that line pulled the weather head from the wall.....and oh yeah, you will have to get a licensed electrician to come out and repair it.

The electrician shows up to tell our hero that the existing weather head is not "up to code" and a permit has to be drawn and the whole residence has to be checked and brought up to code....and by the way, since this home was built in the 50's there is probably aluminum wiring in the attic...The city inspectors will check all of this....and.

Now, it is probably worth mentioning that our hero bought this home with an FHA loan just a few short years ago. During that process everything had to be "brought up to code". But in the length of time between the loan processing and all of this grief. the laws and codes had been updated and revised.....all in the spirit of public safety, don't cha know?

This little stroll through the park cost our hero $8,750.00 to get the light meter back.

I put the house on the market and moved outside of city limits.

So, at the end of this long story?
The question that begs asking?
Is this damn Big Daddy anti-safety or what?
Doesn't he realize and appreciate the dangers of aluminum wiring in a house with a gas leak?

Of course, I realize the inspectors were just doing their job...the plumbers and electricians too....Working stiffs....just like me.

Oh yeah, in case you ain't guessed.....I'm the hero in this story.

This kind of shit right here is why I am an outlaw and been an outlaw all my life. If they wanna sniff my ass, they are gonna have to throw a net over me first.
 
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