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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering what you guys are using to keep the tan color on your seat and sadddlebags looking new? I live in arid New Mexico so I'm worried about the leather getting too dried out and cracking. I'm looking for something that isn't going to change the color of my leather.
 

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I continue to read threads on how to care for the Scout's leather somewhat confusing. Let me try to add some clarity with the little knowledge of this topic that I have. First I will only address the Indian Tan which I have owned now for two and a half years, (not black) which I have no experience with. When Polaris started installing tan leather on their first Chief's they had major issues with the leather dis-coloring and overall appearance of the saddlebags etc, and did become a warranty issue. Indian overcame this problem by using a UV/weather resistant sealant on the tan leather. As I've stated on prior posts I had extra Indian Tan straps to experiment with when it came time for me to refinish the bags, so I hung a couple straps outdoors exposed to full South California sun/weather.

What you see in the photo is one of those exposed straps sitting on my saddlebag which again is 30 months old, lying on my saddlebag which is only exposed to sun when riding. There is no degradation to the strap other than being dirty as I haven't done anything to it since owning it. (Scout now has 48,000 miles which I know is a lot of miles in a short time, but I have no other life:confused:). The leather on my Scout is in mint condition. I use two products on the Indian leather about once a month; Lexol leather cleaner, finished with 303 marine/recreational Aerospace Protectant. On my Corbin leather saddle I use Skidmore's leather cream, although I would use any quality leather treatment such as Fiebings Mink Oil Paste etc as this leather has no applied protectant.

The point is; and this is only my opinion but using oils/creams etc. on Indian Tan Leather is a waste of time/money as these products do not penetrate past the applied finish into the leather. No harm is being done to the leather but it's like putting these products onto "real imitation leather, or Plether". I do think the approach I've been using would be more useful in caring for Indian Tan leather. Again these is just my thoughts on the subject. There will however come a time that my saddlebags will require a new dye job, as well as conditioning after the OEM leather sealant breaks down enough (as it will eventually} to where the bags will show signs of discoloration. At that time the OEM sealant will need to be removed in order for a dye to penetrate and conditioner applied. There is information posted by others on this forum detailing how to accomplish removing the sealant/dying/finishing the leather.
 

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I'm wondering what you guys are using to keep the tan color on your seat and sadddlebags looking new? I live in arid New Mexico so I'm worried about the leather getting too dried out and cracking. I'm looking for something that isn't going to change the color of my leather.
I guess neglect and tire smoke won't suit your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I continue to read threads on how to care for the Scout's leather somewhat confusing. Let me try to add some clarity with the little knowledge of this topic that I have. First I will only address the Indian Tan which I have owned now for two and a half years, (not black) which I have no experience with. When Polaris started installing tan leather on their first Chief's they had major issues with the leather dis-coloring and overall appearance of the saddlebags etc, and did become a warranty issue. Indian overcame this problem by using a UV/weather resistant sealant on the tan leather. As I've stated on prior posts I had extra Indian Tan straps to experiment with when it came time for me to refinish the bags, so I hung a couple straps outdoors exposed to full South California sun/weather.

What you see in the photo is one of those exposed straps sitting on my saddlebag which again is 30 months old, lying on my saddlebag which is only exposed to sun when riding. There is no degradation to the strap other than being dirty as I haven't done anything to it since owning it. (Scout now has 48,000 miles which I know is a lot of miles in a short time, but I have no other life:confused:). The leather on my Scout is in mint condition. I use two products on the Indian leather about once a month; Lexol leather cleaner, finished with 303 marine/recreational Aerospace Protectant. On my Corbin leather saddle I use Skidmore's leather cream, although I would use any quality leather treatment such as Fiebings Mink Oil Paste etc as this leather has no applied protectant.

The point is; and this is only my opinion but using oils/creams etc. on Indian Tan Leather is a waste of time/money as these products do not penetrate past the applied finish into the leather. No harm is being done to the leather but it's like putting these products onto "real imitation leather, or Plether". I do think the approach I've been using would be more useful in caring for Indian Tan leather. Again these is just my thoughts on the subject. There will however come a time that my saddlebags will require a new dye job, as well as conditioning after the OEM leather sealant breaks down enough (as it will eventually} to where the bags will show signs of discoloration. At that time the OEM sealant will need to be removed in order for a dye to penetrate and conditioner applied. There is information posted by others on this forum detailing how to accomplish removing the sealant/dying/finishing the leather.
Thank you your post was VERY helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I continue to read threads on how to care for the Scout's leather somewhat confusing. Let me try to add some clarity with the little knowledge of this topic that I have. First I will only address the Indian Tan which I have owned now for two and a half years, (not black) which I have no experience with. When Polaris started installing tan leather on their first Chief's they had major issues with the leather dis-coloring and overall appearance of the saddlebags etc, and did become a warranty issue. Indian overcame this problem by using a UV/weather resistant sealant on the tan leather. As I've stated on prior posts I had extra Indian Tan straps to experiment with when it came time for me to refinish the bags, so I hung a couple straps outdoors exposed to full South California sun/weather.

What you see in the photo is one of those exposed straps sitting on my saddlebag which again is 30 months old, lying on my saddlebag which is only exposed to sun when riding. There is no degradation to the strap other than being dirty as I haven't done anything to it since owning it. (Scout now has 48,000 miles which I know is a lot of miles in a short time, but I have no other life:confused:). The leather on my Scout is in mint condition. I use two products on the Indian leather about once a month; Lexol leather cleaner, finished with 303 marine/recreational Aerospace Protectant. On my Corbin leather saddle I use Skidmore's leather cream, although I would use any quality leather treatment such as Fiebings Mink Oil Paste etc as this leather has no applied protectant.

The point is; and this is only my opinion but using oils/creams etc. on Indian Tan Leather is a waste of time/money as these products do not penetrate past the applied finish into the leather. No harm is being done to the leather but it's like putting these products onto "real imitation leather, or Plether". I do think the approach I've been using would be more useful in caring for Indian Tan leather. Again these is just my thoughts on the subject. There will however come a time that my saddlebags will require a new dye job, as well as conditioning after the OEM leather sealant breaks down enough (as it will eventually} to where the bags will show signs of discoloration. At that time the OEM sealant will need to be removed in order for a dye to penetrate and conditioner applied. There is information posted by others on this forum detailing how to accomplish removing the sealant/dying/finishing the leather.
Just wondering have you had any issues with your Scout? 48,000 miles is a lot of miles.
 

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Just wondering have you had any issues with your Scout? 48,000 miles is a lot of miles.
I do have issues with my Scout, can't get enough of her. Other than that nothing, nada, zip. And believe me I don't baby her.

I do have standards and don't just park next to anyone.
 

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Lexol...easy peasy
 
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I continue to read threads on how to care for the Scout's leather somewhat confusing. Let me try to add some clarity with the little knowledge of this topic that I have. First I will only address the Indian Tan which I have owned now for two and a half years, (not black) which I have no experience with. When Polaris started installing tan leather on their first Chief's they had major issues with the leather dis-coloring and overall appearance of the saddlebags etc, and did become a warranty issue. Indian overcame this problem by using a UV/weather resistant sealant on the tan leather. As I've stated on prior posts I had extra Indian Tan straps to experiment with when it came time for me to refinish the bags, so I hung a couple straps outdoors exposed to full South California sun/weather.

What you see in the photo is one of those exposed straps sitting on my saddlebag which again is 30 months old, lying on my saddlebag which is only exposed to sun when riding. There is no degradation to the strap other than being dirty as I haven't done anything to it since owning it. (Scout now has 48,000 miles which I know is a lot of miles in a short time, but I have no other life:confused:). The leather on my Scout is in mint condition. I use two products on the Indian leather about once a month; Lexol leather cleaner, finished with 303 marine/recreational Aerospace Protectant. On my Corbin leather saddle I use Skidmore's leather cream, although I would use any quality leather treatment such as Fiebings Mink Oil Paste etc as this leather has no applied protectant.

The point is; and this is only my opinion but using oils/creams etc. on Indian Tan Leather is a waste of time/money as these products do not penetrate past the applied finish into the leather. No harm is being done to the leather but it's like putting these products onto "real imitation leather, or Plether". I do think the approach I've been using would be more useful in caring for Indian Tan leather. Again these is just my thoughts on the subject. There will however come a time that my saddlebags will require a new dye job, as well as conditioning after the OEM leather sealant breaks down enough (as it will eventually} to where the bags will show signs of discoloration. At that time the OEM sealant will need to be removed in order for a dye to penetrate and conditioner applied. There is information posted by others on this forum detailing how to accomplish removing the sealant/dying/finishing the leather.
I'm pretty sure it's the 303 I have for my jeeps top and black plastic fenders and such and after 3 years everything looked like new
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I do have issues with my Scout, can't get enough of her. Other than that nothing, nada, zip. And believe me I don't baby her.

I do have standards and don't just park next to anyone.
Bro you're my hero! You and I could definitely hang. Thanks for your insight.
 

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I have been using Skidmores for over a year now. Great stuff.
 

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F-11 hydrophobic and UV shield. Made by Topcoat.
 
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