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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've created this new forum with the help of Nick J (Thank you very much, Nick J!) as a way for all owners and enthusiasts of the 1970's (including the late 1960's and early 1980's) Indians to get together and share ideas. As of now, for the 1970's Indians, there is a Yahoo Group, some Facebook pages, some business websites and a bunch of miscellaneous chatter about these bikes on various motorcycle forums, but no definitive central forum to bring it all together until now. So I hope to hear from any and all enthusiasts soon! PLEASE NOTE: THIS FORUM IS FOR INDIAN ENTHUSIASTS, AND IS NOT FOR ATTAINING THE VALUE OF AN INDIAN.
 

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I've created this new forum with the help of Nick J (Thank you very much, Nick J!) as a way for all owners and enthusiasts of the 1970's Indians to get together and share ideas. As of now, for the 1970's Indians, there is a Yahoo Group, some Facebook pages, some business websites and a bunch of miscellaneous chatter about these bikes on various motorcycle forums, but no definitive central forum to bring it all together until now. So I hope to hear from any and all enthusiasts soon!
I think you mean a new THREAD (on this forum) and not a new forum - as in a new webpage. Is that correct? In either case, welcome. I, too, would like to see info and thoughts on that era of bikes. :)
 

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Thanks for having me here... Our facebook group (Indian Dirt Bikes) is really good. I have owned some Springfield iron but I also enjoy my dirt bikes and enduro's which get little or no respect from many groups. So I hope that we don't get lost in here....
 

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Howdy, and thanks for posting. anything with 2 wheels and an engine is interesting, and if it has Indian on the tank, then this is the right place for it. Welcome!
--- Randall
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for having me here... Our facebook group (Indian Dirt Bikes) is really good. I have owned some Springfield iron but I also enjoy my dirt bikes and enduro's which get little or no respect from many groups. So I hope that we don't get lost in here....
I'm with Scott, I currently have a Harley, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and have also owned a BSA, Harley Chopper, 1934 Indian Chief and piles of full size bikes, but as crazy as it sounds, I actually prefer the older, smaller cc git-around-town bikes....
 

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Can anyone give me some insight on the supposed rareness of an Indian MS100A or is there no real difference in value than an ME, MT, ML 100. I can only find one actual image of the bike on the Indian dirt bike parts website id your Indian line-up.

I look forward to a response.

Thanks
 

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If I remember correctly it was Floyd Clymer who did, or had a hand in this 1970's resurrection of the Indian name. It was a long time ago though. I also remember there being some re-badged Royal Enfields which were not small bikes. I'm thinking they might have been 750cc vertical twins. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on any of this.
Floyd was an Indian dealer when Indian was still in Springfield and remained so when the British Company bought them in 1954. Floyd wanted to keep the name alive and did so in the 1960's when he bought the name. An attorney (Al Newman) bought the Indian name from Floyd's estate in 1970 when he passed. Al's company was from 1970- January 1977 when they filed for bankruptcy.
 

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If I remember correctly it was Floyd Clymer who did, or had a hand in this 1970's resurrection of the Indian name. It was a long time ago though. I also remember there being some re-badged Royal Enfields which were not small bikes. I'm thinking they might have been 750cc vertical twins. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong on any of this.
Floyd was an Indian dealer when Indian was still in Springfield and remained so when the British Company bought them in 1954. Floyd wanted to keep the name alive and did so in the 1960's when he bought the name. An attorney (Al Newman) bought the Indian name from Floyd's estate in 1970 when he passed. Al's company was from 1970- January 1977 when they filed for bankruptcy.
 

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Aesthetics Vs. Practicality…..or Beware the "FREE" Indian.

I was given (what I could ascertain) a 1973 ME or ML 100cc (97cc per manual) dual purpose stroker. I might be in love.

I had a Honda CB 360T and it is too heavy for what I like. I have never owned a two stroke before, so this is a whole new deal.

My friend who is a Methodist minister received this bike as the will proscribed for performing a eulogy. He never did anything with it, and it has been passed to me with a first overbore, new rings, new piston and crank. It turns over and the magneto has the spark at the plug all nailed down….so I HAVE to make it run….or who knows who will be haunting me from the grave!

As Peter Egan said, in a fit of French Roast and Guinness, I took the whole darn thing apart last week. So far, this is a plus. I have a place that will look at a re-do on the seat, as it is ripped and not hideously lumpy, but moderately significant degradation.

My question is this….the forks are significantly rusted. I was using a wire brush on the drill press, because I was worried about watching the aluminum disintegrate before my eyes in the bead blaster. The rust was mildly dulled and minimally decreased in depth, without significant improvement.

#1 When a part is SO pitted or rusted, that it will not clean up for anything, is it acceptable to finish (powder coat or re-chrome) over the original and still keep the aesthetic?

Keep in mind that this is "FREE" bike.

#2 Is it black heresy to paint a bike another color? This color may have been all the rage in the 1970's, but glossy hot magenta is SO not my thing.

Thanks to all who can help!
 

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Greetings group....Aside from my website, sunnymeadcycles.com/Indian , that has tech info available about these bikes, I am also the person who created the facebook group called "Indian Dirtbikes" that currently has over 200 members from around the world. In March 2008 I had the pleasure of meeting with Mr. Alan Newman in person to discuss his time owning the Indian MoCo. He even signed the rear fender of my ME100 for me (pic attached), which I believe may be the only one signed by him in existance due to he said that a few folks had contacted him over the years since the company closed in 1977, but I was the first to bring one of the bikes he helped produce to show him. I did ask him if he still had any type of documents or literature, but sadly he does not.

Here is the condensed version of what he told me about the time he owned the company. He was Floyd Clymer's attorney prior to Mr. Clymer passing in early 1970. He then purchased the company from Mr. Clymer's widow in an attempt to keep the Indian name alive, which he was able to do for about 7 years. When Mr. Clymer passed his widow literally threw away everything she had that was motorcycle related, sending truck loads of stuff to the dump with everything from literature, parts, manufacturing equipment & tooling, and even complete motorcycles. This is the main reason locating anything from the 1960's era Indian's is so difficult today. Mr. Newman basically purchased the Indian MoCo name from her and not much more. His former relation with Mr. Clymer as his attorney did help to give him access to most all of Mr. Clymer's suppliers, which helped him continue on and create his own new version of the company. He continued on with much success through the early-mid 1970's, at one point being the second largest retailer (Suzuki was the largest) of small displacement motorcycles in the U.S., until.... in 1976 the U.S. started imposing an additional import tax on items manufactured outside the U.S. by U.S. owned companies. All of his assembly manufacturing was done at his plant in Taiwan, even though most all of the parts were from places like Italy, Japan, and the U.S., and then the bikes were imported from there. Other motorcycle manufacturers like Suzuki, Yamaha & Honda were not subject to this additional import tax due to they were not U.S. owned. It was this additional tax that caused him to file for bankruptcy due to he could no longer compete in the retail market without having to pass this additional tax fee along to the consumer, which would have made the cost of buying a new one significantly higher than all of his competitors. I got the feeling from speaking with him that having to do this was a very sore spot in his life as he truly loved what he was doing. At this time he was in the process of creating new larger displacement (500cc & 750cc) street bikes with Ducati that would have worn the Indian name. They even made a few prototypes together. But then Ducati backed out of the deal at the last minute due to the new import tax the U.S. was imposing. So in short, it was the U.S. that caused the downfall of the 1970's Indian MoCo.

One story he was quite proud of was that in the early 1970's actor Steve McQueen placed an order for him to custom build an MM-5A mini mini Bambino model for his son Chad McQueen, which he gladly did. I have since had the opportunity to ask Chad about this bike and he has no idea where it is today, nor does he have any type of documentation to try and trace its serial number through the DMV. All he knows is it was purchased in Southern California by his dad in the early 1970's. He said he would be very interested in locating it though. So it is very possible that somebody out there somewhere has a "missing" McQueen Indian. Documenting it to establish provenance would be the hard part.

I hope this helps shed some light for all of you on the history of the 1970's Indian MoCo.

Keith
 

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Howdie yall, i am new to this site; as well as working on bikes, i do have a mechanical background and metal working, so Ive been doing some research on this bike due to the peak of my interest. Indian, legendary name in different aspects. so ive been wanting a dirt bike for quite some years now, and then when i saved some money up i started searching. and i found a 1972 indian after some other odd finds. so i checked it out the guy said he would trade for it, i for a 1977 md100m Kawasaki for 250+ gas. then took it to the guy which works only on choppers.

so for me to actually add to this thread i will submit:
engine related-
http://www.indiandirtbikeparts.com/files/Indian_F500K_Engine_Service_Manual.pdf
bike related-
http://www.indiandirtbikeparts.com/files/Indian_ME_74_76_100_125_Frame.pdf
owners manual-
http://www.indiandirtbikeparts.com/files/Indian_Junior_Cross0002.pdf

i will be creating this pdf when i get a chance to paper, when i go to school. but i did want to share this information.

quick question. i did notice that we will be needing a chain on my bike and i would like to see the cheapest way to get this running do we have any information on for on the #s i think the chain is 415/420 the rear sprocket has 50 teeth and with four bolts to hold her down.

and ive been thinking how inter changeable are other bike parts. frame was in Taiwan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So you're saying you have a 1974 ME100? If so, the oil is SAE 2 stroke motorcycle oil mixed at 20:1 unless your bike is oil injected. SAE 30W non-detergent oil in the transmission.

About the chain and sprocket, the standard sprocket for the 74 ME100 was 50 tooth w/ 420 chain, but you could also get sprockets with 34, 36, 38, 40 45 and 48 teeth.

About interchangability with other bikes, yes, most parts are interchangable, some parts are common, and some parts are downright impossible to find, so it depends on which parts you're needing from a different frame.
 

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#1-So the oil is SAE 2 stroke motorcycle oil mixed at 20:1 SAE 30W non-detergent oil in the transmission.

#2-About the chain and sprocket, the standard sprocket for the 74 ME100 was 50 tooth w/ 420 chain, but you could also get sprockets with 34, 36, 38, 40 45 and 48 teeth.

#3- About interchangability with other bikes, yes, most parts are interchangable, some parts are common, and some parts are downright impossible to find, so it depends on which parts you're needing from a different frame.
thanks tom.
-1- how do i know to do which one? i got 2 stroke oil. but when i was leaning the bike there was this resivour and i didnt know to what and this was on the left and side.

-2- is the sprocket acting like a final drive in the automobiles? and i was going to play it safe and get 110 links/#420

-3- so if i am not mistaken i just have to find the proper dementions. and for disk breaks the mounts are on the forks? and a strap on oil reserves on the handels?


it is a 1972 indian me100. red. or was lamo. and cant wait to just get this thing up and going.

i did forbet to take phtots so i know how to put it back together. but the clutch handle was totaly free play with no pressure when released, im thinking its a spring in the lever for part of that.
the throttle cable is broken at the insert by the grip, i was going to take it off and messure it to match?, and i cleaned the gas tank but the rust came back,(inside grrrrr) i hope im on the right track so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
#1 If I were you, I'd premix it until I was sure that the oil injection system was working properly. There's a plastic rod inside the pump that breaks without anyone knowing and then seizes your bike. So take the oil pump off the engine and then take a screwdriver and try to turn the cog in the side of the engine block where the pump attaches to the engine. If it turns freely then that rod is busted. The only way to fix it is to crack the crankcase apart or just premix it from now on...
#2The sprocket directly affects the final drive ratio, the bigger ones are for the road and smaller for dirt. I'm not sure how many links the standard chain has but you can still move the wheel back to tighten the chain no matter how many links it has.
#3 These bikes never had disc brakes. not sure what you mean by "oil reserves".
#4 it's a 90% chance your clutch is seized up. Someone may have then pulled the clutch handle too hard and snapped the cable. Check the cable first. Then drain the old trans oil and refill it with new. Let it sit for a few days to soak the clutch plates and then rock the bike back and forth while in first gear. That may free up the clutch plates.
#5 The throttle may be matched to a similar one, or you could buy an indian one online if you can find one.
#6 You may have to cream the inside of the tank. There is a fuel filter in the tank at the top of the petcock, but also put an inline filter between the tank and carb.
 

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So after trying to do this again I went back at it, I started again with the spark, and I got a little mixed up in the wiring but apprently I can get spark when kicking.
Then I went to the fuel problem my gas tank had pin holes so I j b welded the dam thing and stopes the holes for now.
I put in inline fuel filter and petcock, and I wasn't getting fuel in the piston chamber I could get the plug to foul up.
I did pump the choke, and saw it bubbling at the top of the pump For a second, and have no idea what the vacuum line goes to on the exhaust side of the carb or the"kick start" side.
I do Gess that, the vacuum line goes to the rear side of the oil pump?
I feel so close but yet to far, I found a store that sells an air filter because I feel like it's taking in way to much air, and the air screw is lost in my profile photo.
 
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