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Discussion Starter #1
I took my 2017 Springfield into the dealer for some recall work, and after having it on the trickle charger at home for a couple of weeks while it wasn't being ridden, I noticed when I was riding it in to the shop that the battery indicator came up in the display. My thinking originally was that the original OEM battery needed to be replaced after 2+ years of riding, but the dealer says that they suspect the voltage regulator is bad and apparently tested as such. They quoted me $241.99 for the regulator, plus up to 2 hours of labor to replace it, for a total of nearly $500. In looking at the parts diagram, it looks like 2 bolts and 2 plugs to replace it. Firstly, is this truly a regulator issue, or is the battery just due to be replaced; second, is the regulator as easy to replace as it looks like?

The bike has been perfect up until now with nearly 10k on the clock, the only reason it's been in the shop is for the recall work.

Also, just to verify, the Indian/Polaris P/N on the regulator is 4014300. If it's where I'm thinking it is on the bike, should be on the forward part of the frame down towards the bottom of the bike.
 

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Toggle while running and see if you are 14.2-14.4 volts. If so your regulator is in good shape.

I would start with the simple checks listed in the manual...

600312
 
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I took my 2017 Springfield into the dealer for some recall work, and after having it on the trickle charger at home for a couple of weeks while it wasn't being ridden, I noticed when I was riding it in to the shop that the battery indicator came up in the display. My thinking originally was that the original OEM battery needed to be replaced after 2+ years of riding, but the dealer says that they suspect the voltage regulator is bad and apparently tested as such. They quoted me $241.99 for the regulator, plus up to 2 hours of labor to replace it, for a total of nearly $500. In looking at the parts diagram, it looks like 2 bolts and 2 plugs to replace it. Firstly, is this truly a regulator issue, or is the battery just due to be replaced; second, is the regulator as easy to replace as it looks like?

The bike has been perfect up until now with nearly 10k on the clock, the only reason it's been in the shop is for the recall work.

Also, just to verify, the Indian/Polaris P/N on the regulator is 4014300. If it's where I'm thinking it is on the bike, should be on the forward part of the frame down towards the bottom of the bike.

Dealer needs to pound sand.

Ricks Motorsports makes and rebuilds electrical components to much higher tolerances than Polaris.

Unbolt, unplug , re-bolt re-plug 20 min job

 

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I took my 2017 Springfield into the dealer for some recall work, and after having it on the trickle charger at home for a couple of weeks while it wasn't being ridden, I noticed when I was riding it in to the shop that the battery indicator came up in the display. My thinking originally was that the original OEM battery needed to be replaced after 2+ years of riding, but the dealer says that they suspect the voltage regulator is bad and apparently tested as such. They quoted me $241.99 for the regulator, plus up to 2 hours of labor to replace it, for a total of nearly $500. In looking at the parts diagram, it looks like 2 bolts and 2 plugs to replace it. Firstly, is this truly a regulator issue, or is the battery just due to be replaced; second, is the regulator as easy to replace as it looks like?

The bike has been perfect up until now with nearly 10k on the clock, the only reason it's been in the shop is for the recall work.

Also, just to verify, the Indian/Polaris P/N on the regulator is 4014300. If it's where I'm thinking it is on the bike, should be on the forward part of the frame down towards the bottom of the bike.
When that happened to me I have a 16 Springfield it was the key fob battery.Replaced all good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, guys - I just let the dealer know that I'll be picking it up at the end of the week and not to do anything more to the bike. I'll check the volts on the LCD when I get it home, and if they're low/out of range, I'll order one of those units from Rick's and just install it myself. If the volts are good, then I'd imagine that my original hunch is correct and I need a new battery.

Also, I replaced the keyfob battery this spring, so that should still be good. It has to be the regulator or the main battery at this point.
 

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AGAIN: Check that battery ground cable connection on the frame rail [FIRST] as THAT seems to be a common problem on these bikes.Either,it loosens up for whatever reason,vibration maybe,OR,the factory didn't tighten it enough.I had the problem on my bike as did a number of other guys on this site.I had to tighten mine twice,[didn;'t wanna over tighten it and break the bolt] but since the second time,my electrical system has been functioning very well!!
 

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Went ahead and ordered a new regulator from Rick's - installation was easy (as everyone indicated it would be), took like 15 mins with basic hand tools. Bike ran solid after that for 2 months, until tonight when I went to go on a quick lap around town after dinner. It started normally, let it sit and warm up for a couple of minutes while I geared up, checked the voltage before taking off (I make that a habit now every time before I ride) and it read 14.4 volts, no problem. I start my ride, get about a half mile from home and think I see the lights flicker, so just for grins I toggle to the volts on the display and now see that it's reading 12 volts flat, and the battery light is back on again. I book it back home again, cut the engine in the driveway, start it again, 11.9 volts and the battery light is still on. I also noticed (as when the OEM regulator went out) that there's a high-pitched squeal coming from down below where the regulator is mounted, which I suspect is just indicative of a rectifier or something having gone out in the body of the regulator (i.e. a symptom of the problem and not the root of it).

At this point do I chalk this up to having gotten a bad regulator from Rick's, and go back to them for an exchange? Or is it likely that I have deeper issues with the electrical system and I'll continue to blow up regulators unless I address those? And if I do have bigger issues, where do I start diagnosing those?

Also, just FYI, since when I installed the replacement regulator it was in the heart of summer riding season, I haven't had a need to put it on the trickle charger - I've been riding it pretty often. So I don't think it has anything to do with the charger at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Went ahead and ordered a new regulator from Rick's - installation was easy (as everyone indicated it would be), took like 15 mins with basic hand tools. Bike ran solid after that for 2 months, until tonight when I went to go on a quick lap around town after dinner. It started normally, let it sit and warm up for a couple of minutes while I geared up, checked the voltage before taking off (I make that a habit now every time before I ride) and it read 14.4 volts, no problem. I start my ride, get about a half mile from home and think I see the lights flicker, so just for grins I toggle to the volts on the display and now see that it's reading 12 volts flat, and the battery light is back on again. I book it back home again, cut the engine in the driveway, start it again, 11.9 volts and the battery light is still on. I also noticed (as when the OEM regulator went out) that there's a high-pitched squeal coming from down below where the regulator is mounted, which I suspect is just indicative of a rectifier or something having gone out in the body of the regulator (i.e. a symptom of the problem and not the root of it).

At this point do I chalk this up to having gotten a bad regulator from Rick's, and go back to them for an exchange? Or is it likely that I have deeper issues with the electrical system and I'll continue to blow up regulators unless I address those? And if I do have bigger issues, where do I start diagnosing those?

Also, just FYI, since when I installed the replacement regulator it was in the heart of summer riding season, I haven't had a need to put it on the trickle charger - I've been riding it pretty often. So I don't think it has anything to do with the charger at this point.
 

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Usually when a regulator fails it will damage the battery too. Was the battery replaced when you replaced the regulator? If not the battery could have been damaged and that caused the new regulator to fail. Or maybe a possible bad stator.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks - I got the go-ahead from Rick's to send this one back for testing and an exchange, but in the meantime, I'll go buy a new battery as well. The one that's in the bike is still the original from back when I bought it in 2017, so it's probably due to be replaced anyways regardless of the regulator. Once I get the replacement regulator back and have the new battery in there, I'll ride it and see how long it lasts. If I have another issue with the regulator going out, then I'll have to look at replacing the stator I suppose. Not sure how involved that is, but hopefully I don't have to find out.
 

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When that happened to me I have a 16 Springfield it was the key fob battery.Replaced all good.
Same with me on 2018 Springfield. Battery fault displayed then had an incident where engine wouldn’t start. Replaced key fob battery and no more problems. A lot cheaper than a new regulator.
 

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My 2016 Springfield still has original battery and regulator with 18k on it. I went through the battery indications as well, a new $3 battery in the key fob fixed everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Okay, sent the regulator back to Rick's, and they said it tested out fine, so they returned it to me. Got it back today, and also purchased a new battery, installed both after work tonight and went on a ride around town. First thing I noticed is that with the power on and the motor not running, the voltmeter is reading right at 12 volts (which makes sense I suppose). Went ahead and started the bike, the voltmeter took a hot second, but made it up to 14.5 volts and stayed around that reading for the entire ride. But the battery indicator is still showing on the LCD, even after stopping the motor, killing power and restarting multiple times. I think my next step is replacing the key fob battery, since it has been a couple of years since I last replaced it. Just seems awfully coincidental that the OEM regulator, the bike battery and the key fob battery all decided to die around the same time. Though the (dying) OEM bike battery could have caused the regulator to fail from what I've read here on the forums. At any rate, I'll replace the key fob battery tomorrow and see if the battery indicator goes away.

Is it normal for the voltmeter to read 12 volts without the motor running? And does it normally take it a few moments for the stator to kick in and bring it up to the 14.4 or 14.5 volts operating range? Honestly, I'd never had a reason before now to check or watch that, so I have no clue what's normal and what's not.

One other thing I noticed when replacing the OEM battery tonight is that it was a little bit of a struggle to get it out of the battery tray, which in my experience usually means the battery case is slightly swollen (not good). Which also leads me to believe that it was the culprit in this all along. The new battery slid right into the battery tray and if anything seemed a little loose (it's secure under there though - just compared to the OEM one, it was way easier to get in and out of the tray).
 

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Is it normal for the voltmeter to read 12 volts without the motor running? And does it normally take it a few moments for the stator to kick in and bring it up to the 14.4 or 14.5 volts operating range? Honestly, I'd never had a reason before now to check or watch that, so I have no clue what's normal and what's not.

Yep normal
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Replaced the key fob battery tonight, started it up, and same deal - battery indicator is still lit. However, this time, I went about a quarter mile from my house and the TPMS indicator also lit up. Since the reflash for the gear indicator recall, my toggle on the display no longer shows the tire pressures, so I'll check the tire pressures, but according to the part of the manual that PabloPD posted above, if the TPMS sensor battery is low, it will also light up the battery indicator on the display. So if my tire pressures are within range, the combination of the TPMS and battery indicators may mean that I need to replace the TPMS sensors, correct?
 

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Replaced the key fob battery tonight, started it up, and same deal - battery indicator is still lit. However, this time, I went about a quarter mile from my house and the TPMS indicator also lit up. Since the reflash for the gear indicator recall, my toggle on the display no longer shows the tire pressures, so I'll check the tire pressures, but according to the part of the manual that PabloPD posted above, if the TPMS sensor battery is low, it will also light up the battery indicator on the display. So if my tire pressures are within range, the combination of the TPMS and battery indicators may mean that I need to replace the TPMS sensors, correct?
I had the gear indicator repair and associated flash and my tire pressures are on the display...
I have a 2014 Chieftain, but I can’t imagine that Polaris would eliminate the tire pressure readout...
When I replaced my VR about two years ago, I saw that there is a test to check the stator. It is a fairly involved procedure, so I replaced the VR hoping it was the culprit. It was. With all the trouble that you’re having, I would dig in a little deeper.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Maybe I'm missing something, but ever since the reflash, when I cycle through the display with the toggle on the left handlebar, the tire pressures are not there (they used to be before the reflash). Am I missing something there? I'd never really checked on the right handlebar - is there a toggle there as well perhaps? Another concern - did the dealer reflash the wrong firmware for my bike? The display did change quite a bit after the reflash - I now have a segmented fuel level at the top of the LCD, as well as the aforementioned lack of TPMS.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
On my 2017 SF it did nothing - until the dealership reflashed my bike with the latest updates. Now my TPMS front and rear reports there. A third status is whatever I last used on the left switch . If your right hand switch does nothing, you are riding on an old flash.
Just found this on another thread..........also, someone else on that thread said something about holding the right and left toggles both down for a few seconds resets the TPMS? Thinking about trying that as well, but we'll see what I find when I use the right toggle to display the TPMS data.
 
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