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Discussion Starter #1
A lot of people have commented on the poor tyres on the Scout. Well, I've now done just over 200 miles on my Scout Sixty on some very greasy UK roads and had been feeling increasingly confident, until just now: coming round a roundabout very carefully, but very gently applying power to make sure I was past a car in the next lane without inconveniencing him, I found the rear end sliding. Slides always feel worse than they are, but this seemed to me to be one of the longest slides I can remember having; and yet thankfully the bike didn't fall and at no stage did I feel out of control - except that I have no desire to slide any motorbike, especially one I've only had a week. So I'm wondering if this confirms that these tyres need upgrading - or if in fact it shows that they don't, because instead of suddenly breaking away, they start to slide in a very controllable fashion. I don't want to jump to conclusions, but I'd value any genuine wisdom that's come from personal experience.
 

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that wasn't nice! Glad you stayed up though. Well done for controlling it, and in a strange way well done Scout60!

since it was a roundabout is there any chance there was diesel spillage? I think you get diesel tanks just overfilled and going round a roundabout causes a spill. If it was diesel then that was going to happen to any tyre. I think when I've ridden over diesel I've noticed the smell, but that must depend on quantity spilled. Is the roundabout close enough to have another look for possible diesel spillage? Also is the roundabout near a filling station?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Those are valid questions. Thinking about the specific roundabout, I think it's very unlikely that any lorry/truck would ever use that particular part of the roundabout. It's main use would be for cars turning right having travelled down a long winding country road, a long way from any petrol/gas station. As I indicated, the roads here are greasy/slimy at present, but I hadn't experienced this problem before on this bike, so it did take me by surprise.

I'm wondering if this is the kind of thing that has resulted in others saying the tyres are no good; and, if so, if that is a fair conclusion or not.

And I do think the low centre of gravity is one of the things that made it controllable so, yes, well done Scout 60!
 

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I've had my rear tire get a little squirrely more than once, and I just don't think the Kendal tires have enough grip. I believe there are much better choices available and several people have changed their tires, myself included. If you don't have confidence in the tires I say change them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've had my rear tire get a little squirrely more than once, and I just don't think the Kendal tires have enough grip. I believe there are much better choices available and several people have changed their tires, myself included. If you don't have confidence in the tires I say change them.
I like the voice of experience. So which tyres did you opt for, and what noticeable difference do the new ones make?
 

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Considering you're in the UK, maybe a set of Avon Tyres would be appropriate. ;)
I sell a lot of Avons here on the Wet Coast of Canada and many riders like them.
Our climate is similar to yours. When someone asks whether they are good in the rain, I usually say "They are from England, of course they're good in the rain!"
 
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Considering you're in the UK, maybe a set of Avon Tyres would be appropriate. ;)
I sell a lot of Avons here on the Wet Coast of Canada and many riders like them.
Our climate is similar to yours. When someone asks whether they are good in the rain, I usually say "They are from England, of course they're good in the rain!"
That logic would make the Kenda tires good as they come from Taiwan, where it rains about 15 days a month and up to 270mm in one month!
 

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tyres have a profound effect on how you feel about your riding, and I think a lot of riders are convinced that brand X is the best and essential for their bike. Also I think for most bikes the original tyres are very unpopular ... presumably only those riders who already like the brand are happy - I've seen this on lots of bikes. The Kendas fitted to the Scout are known to be 'budget' tyres so this dislike of the originals could have some real basis.

anyway if I had Graham's experience I probably would be looking to swap out the tyres. Others have recommended Pirelli Night Dragon and Michelin Commander II for starters. In the past for middleweight cruisers I've been happiest with Bridgestone Exedra (eg. G721 /G722 for Scout sizes).
 

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Considering you're in the UK, maybe a set of Avon Tyres would be appropriate. ;)
I sell a lot of Avons here on the Wet Coast of Canada and many riders like them.
Our climate is similar to yours. When someone asks whether they are good in the rain, I usually say "They are from England, of course they're good in the rain!"
I have had great luck with Avon over the years riding Harleys, I recently bought a 2016 Scout from our newest dealership here in Langley, BC and have been thinking about upgrading the rubber. So which Avons would you recommend for the Scout?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I feel quite conflicted on this. Some suggest Avon Cobras. Looking at the threads recommended by Boomy, I'm with Davy in considering Michelin Commander 2 or Pirelli Night Dragon. That said, I've had good experiences with Bridgestones on other bikes in recent years. What I'm really hoping for is someone being able to say that they've switched to one of these, and had no slides for several thousand miles, riding on twisty, greasy roads. I had Metzlers on my Breva, and when they got to a stage that they felt fine most of the time, but would unexpectedly slide every now and then, with little provocation, then I'd be looking to replace them. These Kendas feel just like that even though they've only just been scrubbed in.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, the choice is narrowing: in UK at least, there don't seem to be any Bridgestones or Michelins which have both the right sizes and load ratings; however, there are Metzler 888s that meet the legal requirements, and also Avon Cobras and Pirelli Night Dragons; and at least some Scout riders seem happy with the Avons and Pirellis.
 

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I have a barn full of bikes and a few superbikes. None of then scared me more than those Kendas. I switched to Night Dragons and problem solved.
 

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I have a barn full of bikes and a few superbikes. None of then scared me more than those Kendas. I switched to Night Dragons and problem solved.
Same as the Above except went with Michelin Commander II's although if in the UK I might consider Avon Cobra's loved them on several bikes I owned except low mileage got from them ..
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have a barn full of bikes and a few superbikes. None of then scared me more than those Kendas. I switched to Night Dragons and problem solved.
Having just re-read the thread on tyres, the Pirelli Night Dragons do seem to be the way to go. I'll see if I can get some fitted at the 500 mile service. On my California I had to replace the rear tyres every 3500 miles, so even the worst mileages people mention seem good to me! It's grip I want, even if that means changing the rear tyre once or twice a year.
 

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what are the tyre specs on the Kendas? Looking at the Indian website spec it gives load /speed : F 72H, R 71H.

that can't be right, load /speed specs I find on tyres are : F 67H, R 71H or 77H. This will be solved if someone could post the load /speed specs actually found on their tyres. I reckon it'll be : F 67H, R 71H, but that's my best guess.

Pirelli Night Dragons come as F 67H, R 77H. Pirelli also do MT66 which is F 67H, R71H. I know MT66's are highly rated on Kawasaki VN900's (slightly heavier bike, but less power).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
These are the details I copied from the Pirelli UK web site:
Pirelli Night Dragon
Front: 130/90 B 16 M/C 73H REINFTL
Rear: 150/80 B 16 M/C 77H REINFTL
Those are compatible with the specs for the Scout Sixty on the Indian web site.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
what are the tyre specs on the Kendas? Looking at the Indian website spec it gives load /speed : F 72H, R 71H.

that can't be right, load /speed specs I find on tyres are : F 67H, R 71H or 77H. This will be solved if someone could post the load /speed specs actually found on their tyres. I reckon it'll be : F 67H, R 71H, but that's my best guess.

Pirelli Night Dragons come as F 67H, R 77H. Pirelli also do MT66 which is F 67H, R71H. I know MT66's are highly rated on Kawasaki VN900's (slightly heavier bike, but less power).
Just checked the bike; the web site is correct: F72H, R 71H
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well, it seems the Michelin UK site has been updated today, as it's now showing the Commander 2 in the right size and load rating. The choice between the Michelin and Pirelli may come down to price.
 

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Just checked the bike; the web site is correct: F72H, R 71H
wow that's weird ... anyway the Night Dragons & Commander II's meet the specs, and have the more intuitive greater load limit on the rear.

it looks like asking for trouble to have the heavier duty tyre on the front, could this be part of the unforgiving handling of the Kendas?
 
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