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I did a search but didn't find much of anything on this - when planning a longer route, what websites or software do you use? I'm considering a trip from SW Michigan to Portland, OR in the next year or two & wonder about planning for hotel reservations, gas stations, etc. Would like to be able to map by distance too (ex. 550-600 miles/day).

Thoughts/suggestions? Springfield Dark Horse, so I don't have the infotainment package. Am also looking for stand-alone GPS units with auto-rerouting!
 

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I’m die hard Garmin user. I either plan on my computer and transfer routes, waypoints etc to my device, or create routes in the device itself.
 

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The Indian app doesn't cut it. It would be nice to also have dealer locations included in your trip as well as other Indian owners willing to accept a visit. I considered making an app like but I know as soon as I spend $10,000 or more, Polaris will make a good one and waste my money.
 

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Before I got my 19 Roadmaster I had a Garmin Zumo 390LM. I used the Garmin Base Camp software to map out the various 4 day trips I did with a group of friends and found that to work really well. I sold it as I now use the Ride Command Website and app on my phone. I plan the routes on the website and then download them to the Roadmaster via the app on on my phone.
 

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my phone and google maps. If I know I'm going to be riding in places with sketchy cell coverage, I print the google maps out from my computer. Don't need anything else. I can usually remember far enough ahead to burn a tank of gas or so before needing to look at the map again anyhow......
 

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I would recommend REVER. It is fairly easy to use, although it does lack the ability to plug in multiple addresses for waypoints. Rather, it uses a starting address, and ending address, and if you want to add stops in between, you have to select points on the map. However, it does offer the ability to download a compatible .gpx file that can be uploaded on the Ride Command website. You can then use the app on your phone to xfer the file to the bike.

If you ride with others, and are willing to pony up the annual cost for the Pro version, you can create riding groups in the REVER app (and website), add your friends (if they have REVER), and everyone in the group will be able to view your rides, as well as download them and follow the route on their phone. You can also use the app to track your rides, and see rides/routes that other people in the area have made.
 
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Before I got my 19 Roadmaster I had a Garmin Zumo 390LM. I used the Garmin Base Camp software to map out the various 4 day trips I did with a group of friends and found that to work really well. I sold it as I now use the Ride Command Website and app on my phone. I plan the routes on the website and then download them to the Roadmaster via the app on on my phone.
I've use Roadtripper with fair success. I say fair because I finished it after exporting it and importing it to my Garmin. But it gave me a great start with just a few changes on the Garmin.
 

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I use Furkot. You can use it to plan your routes but it will also let you book places to stay, find attractions and help with gas stops and food. Stand alone GPS I use a Garmin Zumo 396. I save the Furkot map to my computer, then open it up in basecamp so I can get the maps synced. Doing that just entails taking a part of the route and moving on to the road and the route recalculates. I then dump it to my GPS and I am set. I have also used Furkot to dump right to my bike, when importing the bike will automatically recalculate to snap the path to the roads. (When going from different software sometimes the maps are not quite the same so there needs to be a recalculate to put you back on the road because going from one to the other might show a path 10 feet off the road but parallel to it.)
 

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I’m die hard Garmin user. I either plan on my computer and transfer routes, waypoints etc to my device, or create routes in the device itself.
I use Basecamp to plan and save routes. Although time consuming, I check out everything on Google Earth to insure it becomes more enjoyable and less stress. Only then do I transfer to the Garmin Zumo
 

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I have been using Tourstart for about a year. It works pretty well but can be slow. Switched to REVER Pro a few weeks ago and like it a bit better, They are similar in function.
Rever's web site is a lot faster and they use Butler maps. Tourstart uses a lower cost map provider that isn't always accurate in Texas.

BOTH products need to export the routes to a Garmin format and import the same into Ride Command. Import can be either via USB drive directly into your bike, or by uploading to the Indian Ride Command website. Then using your phone to sync it to the bike.

Both allow you to create a library of some really nice routes -- including multiple stops.
 

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I've used the Harley RidePlanner website for the past 3 years in planning my multi-week yearly summer trips. You can download the routes to GPX format which can be used by most GPS systems. I've used the routes on my Garmin Zumo mounted to my Dark Horse, and of course, also on my actual Harley's navigation system. The site saves the routes for you, and you can easily share links to them which is also a plus. In about 3 months or so, I'll be back at it planning 2020's adventure. :)

Here is a link to a random day from last year's trip if you want to see what it looks like. This ride through Death Valley was incredible:
2019 Day 6 Pahrump, NV to MORRO BAY

And here are a couple tips:

Be sure to zoom in and ensure your waypoints and starting/ending locations are on a road (or actual addresses), not out in the weeds 100 yards off the highway. Any GPS will literally try and get you to be within a small radius of the waypoint, they take them literally.

Use a starting and ending point, and then use waypoints to force the nav to route you down certain/preferred routes.

The "paved roads only" is handy.

When starting out for a day, if you are not AT your starting location when you fire up the route, most GPS units will try and route you back there. This happens on my Garmin unit as well as the built-in Harley nav. It is usually best to start at the first waypoint.
 
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