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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a little overzealous when tightening down one of my oil drain plug bolts doing my oil change today, and torqued the head off of it. It's not really leaking or anything, so I think I'm good for right now, but I'm thinking about trying to remove the bolt myself using a left-handed drill bit or EasyOut at some point. Before I attempt to fix it myself though, how much would the service department at my local dealership likely charge to take care of it? I have used them before for other things, and they're good folks, so I trust them to do it correctly.

I'm reasonably good with tools and such, just never had to specifically do something like this before. My concern is that I could possibly bugger it up worse than it already is and end up costing myself a ton more money if I pull a bonehead move and end up pushing the bolt back up into the case or splitting the bottom of the crankcase or something stupid like that.
 

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We all have days like that!!
It is the sort of job I would be tempted to do myself, and at some point before finishing I would then regret starting it and think "why didn`t I let someone who knows what they are doing do it!! "
Good luck
 

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If the dealer charges flat rate, you are looking at about an hour of work, plus the cost of the replacement bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
So probably somewhere between $100 and $200 bucks, roughly. Given the potential ramifications if I screw it up (no pun intended there), it could cost me a whole lot more than that - I'll probably call them on Monday and get on the schedule. It sucks, but it is what it is. At least it isn't leaking like a sieve at this point (fortunately).

In theory, it seems like a simple job, but if things go badly at any point, I could mess up the crankcase, bugger up the threads in the bolt hole, get a bunch of metal shavings in the bottom of the case, or a combination of all of those (and/or a bunch of other things that I'm not thinking of right now). I'm sure that this isn't the first time they've had someone do this to their bike, so they've got plenty of experience fixing it as well as the right tools to do the job. I have neither of those things at this point, so probably better to just suck it up and spend the $$$ to get it done right so there's no further damage.

Hopefully they're able to save the new oil change I just did. I guess if they lose a quart in the process it's no biggie, they'll just add it to the bill.
 

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I had my indy mechanic do it and he just welded a piece of metal to the bolt and removed it with a pair of vice grips. Not sure exactly how much he charged me because it was part of a whole bunch of things I had done.
 

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If the dealership will tackle this, I’d probably let a professional do it. A tech should have experience with broken bolts, etc., and may know some tricks you’re not aware of. Even if they hit you with two hrs of labor, that’s better than screwing up the case up and now you're spending big money. If you bugger it up, it may be unsalvageable.
 

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So probably somewhere between $100 and $200 bucks, roughly. Given the potential ramifications if I screw it up (no pun intended there), it could cost me a whole lot more than that - I'll probably call them on Monday and get on the schedule. It sucks, but it is what it is. At least it isn't leaking like a sieve at this point (fortunately).
It takes a wise man to step back and understand maybe it’s better for someone else to tackle a job. All of us at some point have started something we wished we’d never started in the first place. I worked in an automotive repair shop many years ago. When someone would come in and ask how much it would cost to get something fixed the boss often asked if they had attempted to fix the problem themselves. If the answer was yes, the price was generally higher as he knew it would likely take longer in the end to fix the problem. As they say, sometimes help, isn’t help.

I tend to want to “fix” something myself. My wife is a good barometer for me when I begin a questionable repair project. She’ll stand nearby asking me if I’m sure this is something I should be doing. Unfortunately, she’s generally not too far off the mark. It‘s a great day when I’m able to successfully complete the repair in those situations. A good day is defined as me tossing in the towel without causing more damage. And we all know what a bad day looks like.

Have a “great” or “good” day!
 
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