Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I left for a ride with tires at 36 front, 40 rear. I was on the interstate for about 1.5 hrs when I noticed my tire light was on. I flipped to the PSI screen and the front tire was showing -- and the rear showed 46. I know that the PSI gets higher when the tires get warmed up. This just seemed like it was a fairly large increase to me. I stopped at a rest area and let some air out. I made it 39 in the front and 44 in rear (if I remember right) and road all day fine.
When I got ready to leave the hotel this morning i knew my PSI would be lower. I turned on the bike and my light was on again front -- rear 36. I stopped and put some air in and road home with no issues.
I've never had a PSI gauge on a bike before so maybe i'm just being paranoid, but I don't like it when the warning light comes on.
How much does your PSI change once the tires get warm???
My bike is a 2014, and I bought it about 6 weeks ago with only 2700 miles on it, (4315 now) so it is still running on original tires. I wonder if the tires being 5yrs old accounts for a larger than normal increase in PSI once warm. Any thoughts?
 

·
Vendor / bronze
Joined
·
2,725 Posts
Yep. The pressure changes a lot when you ride. I just try to find a number that is a little low in the summer. Knowing it will get hot. In the winter I keep it right at the suggested spec since it doesn't heat up as much. I bugs me to have to do all this but compared to a car a bike's tires are too critical. I want my bike to grip the road as much as possible while I dodge all the careless cagers.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,511 Posts
rear 41 cold, front 38 cold after riding and warmed up I checked just for shi*s and giggles... rear 49 front 45... but I never had the light (warning bar) come on yet... except right after I brought her home and the rear was too low.... I put in what the owners manual says and haven't seen it since.. but off topic kinda' it really torques me that you have to be moving 15mph to activate the sensors... I would like to know before I leave not after... just a pet peeve of mine..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
From my experience, the "--" indicates the receiver lost connection to the sensor in the tire. After 5 years, the battery may be going dead which means replacing the sensor. As far as pressure, I maintain 36 front and 41 rear cold. After riding they will creep up considerably. I do not let air out when hot after riding.
 

·
Silver member
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
8-10 lbs is pretty normal once the tires heat up. -- just means you lost communication with the sensor triggering the light. I would worry unless it keeps happening continuously.

If you tire gets too low it will trigger the TPMS light. High pressure not so much.

Just set the to the correct factory spec while the tires are cold and ride on. If you trigger the -- again then it is likely the battery in your sensor. So ride those tires out and fix it when it is time for a new tire. You just have to monitor it the old fashioned way for another 10k or whatever...
 

·
Silver member
Joined
·
3,130 Posts
I check tire pressure the old fashion way, us old pharts :p call the tool used a tire gage, or similar. Anyways, I run my tires about 3-4 lbs low cold. They heat up on the slab and pressure increases.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
415 Posts
The light came on because of the no reading in the front. They will come on for too low and high pressure too. But mine didn't come on for too high until the rear hit 51. That was running fully loaded and it was over 100* outside.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
809 Posts
On average my TPs go up between 6-9 psi when hot. Don't take air out when hot. As you found out it will make for a low pressure cold.

TP is always going to go up once the tires heat up. It is just physics. Even nitrogen filled will go up some but not nearly as much as air filled.

Never had my TP light come on so I must be doing it right.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
903 Posts
There is a reason that the factories (ALL of them) say to check COLD tire pressures. You can't be sure what they will be once they get heated up and you shouldn't worry about it. Set the tires while they're cold (before riding) and don't sweat it afterwards, unless the dash readout says they are LOW after you've been riding on them.
By the way, most of the time, the rise in tire pressures isn't a big reflection of ambient temperatures. It is the action of the tires against the road, carcass flexing that heats up the air inside the tires. Ambient temps and road surface temps are secondary and (most of the time) are not such a big factor in tire temps. You guys in Death Valley (and such) will say otherwise and for good reason. When the tarmac gets hot enough to fry an egg, it IS a factor in considering tire temperatures. But most of the time, in most of the continental US, heating of the air in the tires is accomplished by the tire's physical dynamics and external conditions are secondary.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
1,314 Posts
On the RM and Vintage, I run 39Fr. and 41 Rear. The front doesn't fluctuate much, but the rear on the RM can gain about 8PSI after riding a while. No idea on the Vintage, but when I check the pressure, it doesn't change a whole lot.

On the Springfield, I run 46fr. and 41 R.. The front doesn't deviate a lot and the Rear can go up about 6 or so psi. It's all good and supposed to work that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Tire pressure can increase 25% during riding, thats all okay. It depends on the kind of riding, more sporty or cruising and the total load of the bike.

As "theMucker" said before, check pressure if tires are cold, and don't care about higher pressure during riding
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
Lol your tires have always run that high in pressure when rolling. You just never knew about it before indian put it in your face. See some things are better off not knowing. Just Roll !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
From my experience, the "--" indicates the receiver lost connection to the sensor in the tire. After 5 years, the battery may be going dead which means replacing the sensor. As far as pressure, I maintain 36 front and 41 rear cold. After riding they will creep up considerably. I do not let air out when hot after riding.
This make sense, I was thinking that the “- -“ meant that the tire was out of the allowable limit. The lost connection explains why the light came on too.
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
902 Posts
Yep, you have lost connection. My rear used to do that all the time....ended up getting replaced under warranty.

I run 39 front and 42 rear on my 2016 Roadmaster when cold. While driving in the Canadian summer (which is not really that hot....maybe 85f) my rear pressure will heat up to 52 - 54. I never let the air pressure out when hot.....I imagine that is what it is suppose to heat up to.

To me those TPMS are a waste of time, except in the first mile of riding and tires are cold. After that it don't matter....except if you loose pressure.

Now, if they would read right off the git-go would be better, so you could start your bike and adjust pressures if required, (at least know how many pounds pressure you are low) without having to ride it. By the time I ride to a service centre, the pressures have risen by themselves and I don't know how many more pounds to put in them.

--
Gordon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Yep, you have lost connection. My rear used to do that all the time....ended up getting replaced under warranty.

I run 39 front and 42 rear on my 2016 Roadmaster when cold. While driving in the Canadian summer (which is not really that hot....maybe 85f) my rear pressure will heat up to 52 - 54. I never let the air pressure out when hot.....I imagine that is what it is suppose to heat up to.

To me those TPMS are a waste of time, except in the first mile of riding and tires are cold. After that it don't matter....except if you loose pressure.

Now, if they would read right off the git-go would be better, so you could start your bike and adjust pressures if required, (at least know how many pounds pressure you are low) without having to ride it. By the time I ride to a service centre, the pressures have risen by themselves and I don't know how many more pounds to put in them.

--
Gordon
38 front, 41 rear, cold on my Vintage. I never check it when hot, never had any issues
 

·
Silver member
Joined
·
4,419 Posts
To me those TPMS are a waste of time, except in the first mile of riding and tires are cold. After that it don't matter....except if you loose pressure.
Gordon
I kind of thought the same thing until the TPMS saved my ass on my cross country trip last summer. Story goes:

High elevation Colorado on a cold morning. TPMS goes off. I toggle while moving and hot pressure is well above the recommended levels. hmmmn, I thought. Rode on down the pass switching between the F and R setting monitoring the pressure to see if it went down on either tire. Nada, nothing showing any changes in hot air pressure . Stopped got gas. TPMS light went off for the rest of the day. I thought oh, it was that weird transition from valley temp to top of the mountain temp swing maybe caused some chaos plus I had hit some heavy rain.

Next morning I take off, Again TPMS light went on. I review the pressures again as this time it came on early around 10-15 miles into my ride. I had noted the end of day pressure reading the day before. The pressure was lower, hmmmmn, but by very little. Again, I monitor the pressure even though the reading was a bit low and find it seems to be holdings steady. I finish my final day ride about 6 hours and arrive at my Dad's house in Kansas.

Next morning I check the bike cold. I am down to 40 PSI in the front tire so I am 6llbs low at cold pressure over two days. I air it up to the Springfield spec, 46psi. I don't ride that day. Spend my time with family and in cages all day. Bike is in Dad's workshop. Next day I go check the tire pressure and the bike is at 42lbs cold tire pressure. Hmmmn, 4lbs over night.

Okay, something is wrong. Call Kansas City Indian. Make an appointment. Explain I am travelling around the country. Next day they do me a solid and get me in ahead of their scheduled appointments as long as I arrive an hour before they open.

Anyway, sure enough there were two minute penetrations that I could not see on my inspection.. The road probably burned off the metal that punctured the tire. But once off the rim there were two tiny punctures with metal sticking through and inside the tire. So it was likely some kind of heavy staple I picked up in Steamboat Springs on a section of road they were working on that was really rough and grooved up. I assume it bounced out of some kind of work truck that went down that section of highway 40. BTW, it was so heavily grooved that their were orange caution signs specifically warning MC riders as you entered the construction zone.

I could have rode on back to California, but would have had to stop daily and add air to the tire. Luckily, the TPMS saved the day just by letting me know something was wrong, I fixed the tire, and got home safely with no hassle.

BTW, everything else went great on the Springfield 4,403 miles in 9 days. 4 to Kansas, 9 days home with family, and 5 days back to Cali with a detour through South Dakota, Yellowstone etc.

Sorry this is so long. Point is, I am all in for TPMS now that is worked as designed. Same as I was all in for ABS once I actually had a hard stop on this bike. Both systems worked perfectly for me and as designed...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I left for a ride with tires at 36 front, 40 rear. I was on the interstate for about 1.5 hrs when I noticed my tire light was on. I flipped to the PSI screen and the front tire was showing -- and the rear showed 46. I know that the PSI gets higher when the tires get warmed up. This just seemed like it was a fairly large increase to me. I stopped at a rest area and let some air out. I made it 39 in the front and 44 in rear (if I remember right) and road all day fine.
When I got ready to leave the hotel this morning i knew my PSI would be lower. I turned on the bike and my light was on again front -- rear 36. I stopped and put some air in and road home with no issues.
I've never had a PSI gauge on a bike before so maybe i'm just being paranoid, but I don't like it when the warning light comes on.
How much does your PSI change once the tires get warm???
My bike is a 2014, and I bought it about 6 weeks ago with only 2700 miles on it, (4315 now) so it is still running on original tires. I wonder if the tires being 5yrs old accounts for a larger than normal increase in PSI once warm. Any thoughts?
Mine does the same thing, its annoying, but stopped once the weather cooled down
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,359 Posts
Make sure to recheck and adjust your tire pressures again when they cool down. Don't ever let air out of a tire unless you overfill it, pressure increases are accounted for with the OEM tire pressure recommendations. FWIW, this is also why bikes that see lots of miles every time they leave the garage get better tire mileage than bikes that only ever take short rides. The pressure recommendation is calibrated to give correct pressure range once heated up, so cold it is actually a bit low and will accelerate wear.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
I think the best thing about the monitor is if you pick up something in the tire and shows losing air. Other then that I gauge them cold. More accurate IMO
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
1,311 Posts
Checking tire pressure hot goes against everything I know about being on the road. It is even stamped on the tire to check it cold. Tires are critical regardless of what they are on. I just didn't see myself pulling a NY Thruway A-train grossing 150k pounds, and stopping mid-trip to check 34 tires for shits and grins when it took 45 minutes just to get to speed.
 
1 - 20 of 70 Posts
Top