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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When fooling with the battery, couple weeks back, I noticed the ground terminals were crimped on the ends of a thin-stranded cable, like so:



You can see the strands either side are not crimped down. Nor are the strands in the center all in direct contact with the terminal. Cold weather prolly shrinks the strands, too.

I stripped back a little on either end, hung the cable from the work bench on a nail (could not find my vise --- how in blazes do you lose a vise!?!), heated the terminal with my propane torch, then melted a whole gob of solder into it. This ought to unite all strands into a single connection, like so:



Well, this weekend, Saskatchewan blew a wind our way, so that I was finally able to test. Sunday morning, 28 degrees outside, engine temp 42, fired up. Fired again Sunday night. Monday, 28 degrees again, fired up. Monday night, same deal. By now she had fired up four times with no charger and no running around to charge either. This morning came the acid test. Eleven degrees outside, brisk wind, 35 in the garage, engine temp 34, would not start this fifth time. I'll try again when I get home.

So I have definitely seen improvement; we're going in the right direction; just we're not there yet. Based on this test, I am inclined to tin the cable from the battery to the solenoid, as well as the cable from the solenoid to the starter. However, I will wait for a DC clamp tester which I have on order, because I am eager to check amperage either side of the solenoid and at the starter, before and after tinning the terminals.

I'm not about to ride her to work and park her in this coldass wind in front of the office, even if she did start. The garage gets the chill knocked off because the backside of the chimney is in the garage. In front of the office, the naked engine temp would take a nose dive. For example, I rode Biffy Bullfrog the KLR650 to yoga this morning at seven. When I emerged at 8:30, damp inside the clutch bowden cable had frozen so hard that I had to leave her idle fast on the choke for three or four minutes before engine heat freed the cable in its sheath. (Here's a tip for you: when riding in winter, park in neutral, so that you can start without having to clutch... that's a habit you learn the first time and don't forget). Biffy Bullfrog, by the way, owns the identical YuasaYTX14AHL-BS rated 210CCA as does Sopowa. Kawasucky specs out a big batt. This juice box turns half as much engine with a quarter less compression and a compression release to boot, plus no widgetry to speak of, not even a fuel pump, cause she's an old fashioned carby with a manual choke. Plus she's not running no preposterous 60 weight oil, either. Needless to say, Biffy's a real good starter. Prolly has me spoiled that way.

All's I'm saying is tin your terminals. Helps.
 

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flying down the road trying to loosen my load.
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You would think that people who build quality things that require wires and electronics would understand this and do it at the factory or point of assembly - I was taught to always tin my ends in high school for friggin sakes. Good on ya for fixing what a knuckle head should have done right the first time.
 

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Definitely have this in mind to do soon ..
Likewise, two mornings with sluggish starting noises has seen the tender hooked up after work at night. Jay, are you required to ride with headlights on over in the States? We do here and that helps recharge the battery through the additional drain on the battery.
Alpal
 

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Likewise, two mornings with sluggish starting noises has seen the tender hooked up after work at night. Jay, are you required to ride with headlights on over in the States? We do here and that helps recharge the battery through the additional drain on the battery.
Headlight on at all times since Mid 1970's .. Can't even Crank it up with the Lights Off unless have a Old Old Motorcycle .. Last one I had that had to turn the lights on manually was the 1970 Sportster and only other one owned with a switch option was the 1951 Harley Panhead ..
 

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Headlight on at all times since Mid 1970's .. Can't even Crank it up with the Lights Off unless have a Old Old Motorcycle .. Last one I had that had to turn the lights on manually was the 1970 Sportster and only other one owned with a switch option was the 1951 Harley Panhead ..
I fitted a switch to my Intruder. Much easier starting that way.
Alpal
 
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I stripped back a little on either end, hung the cable from the work bench on a nail (could not find my vise --- how in blazes do you lose a vise!?!), heated the terminal with my propane torch, then melted a whole gob of solder into it. This ought to unite all strands into a single connection.

Just came back from THD with a torch & solder. It's on the to-do list for Mon/Tues. In the meantime I move le crap around the garage and got it close enough to an outlet to hook up the BatterTender[tm].

I fitted a switch to my Intruder. Much easier starting that way.
Alpal

This wouldn't be a bad idea to add - a kill switch that effectively disconnects the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Spoke to Hernley's today. No service bulletin yet regarding cold start probs --- but they are hoping to get one. They've had a steady series of Scouts come in with cold start issues since it first turned chilly here, not long ago. With every one, they hit Polaris with a new email. No definitive answer yet. Soon's they get one, they will ping everyone they sold a Scout to.

So it's an issue, and they are trying to come up with something.

I suggested the terminals to the tech I spoke with. New one on him. I mentioned the thick oil and he agreed. Who knows --- might turn out to be something other entirely.

Optimism.
 

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Spoke to Hernley's today. No service bulletin yet regarding cold start probs --- but they are hoping to get one. They've had a steady series of Scouts come in with cold start issues since it first turned chilly here, not long ago. With every one, they hit Polaris with a new email. No definitive answer yet. Soon's they get one, they will ping everyone they sold a Scout to.

So it's an issue, and they are trying to come up with something.

I suggested the terminals to the tech I spoke with. New one on him. I mentioned the thick oil and he agreed. Who knows --- might turn out to be something other entirely.

Optimism.
I know you'll keep us up to date. I'm going to follow up with my dealer with the same issue.
 

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Alpal's switch on his Suzuki is a good idea ... so you get the starting done before you turn on the headlight.
I've had two cruisers with electrics that did that automatically : ignition on - sidelight on, start motor, when running headlight comes on.
 

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I think the scout needs a block heater to run in the colder temps. I've seen people putting hot plates under bikes to preheat. In the USCG we have hot starts on all the motors to keep them warm and ready.
 

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I think the scout needs a block heater to run in the colder temps. I've seen people putting hot plates under bikes to preheat. In the USCG we have hot starts on all the motors to keep them warm and ready.
USCG?, Big Waves?,.......Cool,.... I get it,......I like it,....
Alpal
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think the scout needs a block heater to run in the colder temps. I've seen people putting hot plates under bikes to preheat. In the USCG we have hot starts on all the motors to keep them warm and ready.
So I ride to the office, park eight hours... where do I plug in my hot plate?

Had an old R69 once a lifetime ago. Weird sideways kickstart those old airheads had. Danish friend of mine told me back in the old country they would light a crumpled newspaper on a cold morning and throw it under the pan. More about heating the air, says he, than heating the oil.

Had two GM diesel cars years ago. Glow plugs rock.
 

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Evening Folks,
I learned to build aircraft-quality wiring harnesses with tinned leads in the US Air Force. I made very good money for many years using those skills to build motorcycle wiring harnesses, because they were reliable year after year. Takes time though, and modern wiring harnesses are much more complex...
--- Randall
 

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Evening Folks,
I learned to build aircraft-quality wiring harnesses with tinned leads in the US Air Force. I made very good money for many years using those skills to build motorcycle wiring harnesses, because they were reliable year after year. Takes time though, and modern wiring harnesses are much more complex...
--- Randall
Everything good takes time, look at Whiskey & Wine or Women.
 

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So I have definitely seen improvement; we're going in the right direction; just we're not there yet. Based on this test, I am inclined to tin the cable from the battery to the solenoid, as well as the cable from the solenoid to the starter. However, I will wait for a DC clamp tester which I have on order, because I am eager to check amperage either side of the solenoid and at the starter, before and after tinning the terminals.
Have tinned the positive side yet? Inquiring minds want to know!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Have tinned the positive side yet? Inquiring minds want to know!
Nope. Still waiting for the DC clamp meter to arrive. Effing Chinese chiselers selling on Amazon said three day shipping but never said they were in China. Told Amazon they need to stop dealing with these outfits. Pisses people off. But no local store has a DC clamp meter ... all they have is AC.

Sopowa has been parked totally useless ever since winter chill hit us.
 

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Nope. Still waiting for the DC clamp meter to arrive. Effing Chinese chiselers selling on Amazon said three day shipping but never said they were in China. Told Amazon they need to stop dealing with these outfits. Pisses people off. But no local store has a DC clamp meter ... all they have is AC.

Sopowa has been parked totally useless ever since winter chill hit us.
I tinned my ground cable today. A couple tips:

CABLE:
  1. After the ground cable is fully removed, secure one end in a vise or suitable facsimile.
  2. Gently warm up the insulation along the entire length, and wearing gloves, try to pull the insulation away from one end.
  3. When you have sufficient room, tin the exposed end.
  4. Gently warm up the insulation along the entire length, and wearing gloves, try to pull the insulation away from the other end.
  5. When you have sufficient room, tin the exposed end.
  6. Gently warm up the insulation along the entire length, and wearing gloves, gently stretch the insulation back to cover entire copper.

BATTERY:
My battery hold-down clamp needed additional padding to contact the top of the battery and do the job it was engineered for. There was at least a 5mm gap between the top of the battery and the underside of the hold-down clamp. I used some AP/Armaflex insulation tape, 1/8" thick, 2" wide (3mm thick, 50mm wide) and cut it to the same size as the exist top pad.
hold-down clamp
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Looked into the two terminals on both pozzy cables yesterday. The terminals on the short cable from the battery to the solenoid may already be tinned. Can't see, cause they are covered with a shrink wrapped rubbery sleeve. But they feel like they are. The loooong cable from the solenoid to the starter, however, is another story. Not only is it crimped, but the crimp is a little square in the middle of a bundle of strands. No way there's a good connection there.

So I followed the cable down beneath to works and forward to the starter. Had to remove that flimsy plastic radiator cover to get any view of the terminal on the starter. Here's the thing: Looks like I would have to dismount the radiator to get at that terminal. I would be able to tin it in place without removing, cause I could dangle it down beneath the works and work it right there. But getting to it, that's another story. not up to dismounting the rad at present; so I buttoned it back up.

The starter appears to be about 4 1/2 or 5" long by 3" diameter. Tough to get in there and measure. About the same size as the KLR starter, which cranks half as much engine. But then, the beemer starter.

pondering...
 
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