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I'm thinking of "droppin' the dime" and getting a good lift. Cleaning the wheels on these beasts is painful at best. Has anybody had any experience with the J & S Motorcycle Lift?
Motorcycle Lift - J&S Jacks | World's Finest Motorcycle Lift
LIfting this bike is not as easy as it may look. There is no frame to jack up on. You will need to make some wooden cradles to support the engine block to be able to lift the bike. I agree with Dan, I have a Harborfreight lift that will work just fine without spending that much money. The bigger issue here is finding the best way to cradle the engine block for the best support without damaging the anti skid lines. Dean E
 

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Enzo Heard good things about the J & S, don't own one so can't help you with that. But if space is a premium you will want something that is mobile & light, I have an in ground "bestway" lift because of my space, it is level with the floor so you can still drive a car over it & walk over it w/out tripping or stepping up. I found it on Craigslist a couple of years ago for cheap. Best thing I have done as far as a lift goes. As others have stated many times, the biggest issue is getting a stable framework made for the bottom of the engine, not only are the flats uneven, they are also slanted to a degree. Good luck with your decision.
 

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They all have them, scouts have little ones........Just gotta have a good lift ta see em...........
 

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I love my J & S jack. Bought in 2001 with 4 wheels, straps allow me to move the bike on the steel wheels.
I bought it for my HD Electric (very heavy bike).
Used it for my VTX 1800 (just sold it)
Now plan to use it for my Indian I now own.
After hearing about the frame I will get my welder out to modify the jack to handle the Vintage.
 

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Maybe someone will figure out how to pick it up with a ceiling hoist. That may save some people the issue about letting the wife park in your garage. You can always build the wife a garage behind the house as I did.
 

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I love my J & S jack. Bought in 2001 with 4 wheels, straps allow me to move the bike on the steel wheels.
I bought it for my HD Electric (very heavy bike).
Used it for my VTX 1800 (just sold it)
Now plan to use it for my Indian I now own.
After hearing about the frame I will get my welder out to modify the jack to handle the Vintage.
You may want to check with J&S as I believe they came out with a different add on set-up, specifically for the 2014/15 Indian.
 

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Here is how I did the lifting of my Chieftain.
First of all I bought the Wheel Dock especially made for 2014 and up Indian Chief's from the link:
WheelDock Motorcycle Wheel Chock - EZ Up Center Stand
That way the bike is standing stable in upright position.

Then I bought a "High Position Motorcycle Lift" from Harbor Freight.
from the link:
http://www.harborfreight.com/high-positbion-motorcycle-lift-99887.html

I was skeptical seeing the wimpy forks sticking out where the bike would be sitting on, but figured I probably can make it work.
I made two 2x4 wood blocks that would fit on the bottom of the motor block between brake lines and other stuff and then putting them on the lift arms. Excited...pumping the bike up and realized right away the flexing of the two lift arms. The bike was leaning pretty good away from the lift mechanism. It looked pretty scary, but I went so far as getting both wheels off the ground. Anyway that was obviously not going to work. Then I put a smaller piece of wood under one side of the 2x4 where the bike was leaning to, to compensate for the flexing of the lift arms. Repeated the lifting again and oh what a surprise the bike lifted straight up, but still would be quite wobbly. I locked the lift in it's lowest position with the provided looking pin and let it rest on it. Then I measured from the floor up to the underside of the flexed lifting arms and added about 20mm or 0.79 inches to that measurement to make some wooden support blocks. I made the blocks to my measurements, lifted the lift up to release the pressure of off the locking pin, put the wooden blocks under the lift arms lowered the lift and let the lifting arms sit on the looking pin and my supportive wooden blocks. And there I had it...a stable lift with the bike securely sitting with the wheels off the ground.
That was good enough for cleaning the wheels and adjust the driving belt, but not high enough to take the wheels off the bike for a tire change.

For that reason I measure the overall outside diameter of the rear wheel, then jacked the bike up to the height that the wheel would clear the rear and front fender to be able to roll the wheels out under the lowest point of the fenders. That measurement was 670mm or 26.4 inches from the ground to the lowest point of rear fender and was also high enough for the front fender to remove the front wheel without removing the front fender. Then I marked the drilling of a new hole for the support pin on the lift at that position and did the same procedure for higher wooden supports under the lift arms for that new position.

Did some improvements by screwing the small wooden blocks to the 2x4's and fixing the 2x4 with attached small wooden blocks with a steel bracket to the lifting arms. That way there is no movement and they are always in the right location at the underside of the motor block.

The bottom line here is, that it is reasonable inexpensive and the bike sits very stable on the lift without strapping it down. The only thing is that you can't roll the lift around with the bike on it, but that was not a concern for me.

I also bought a floor jack for lowering and raising the wheels with ease. The jack I bought is much too heavy (3 Ton), but is a very low profile and will raise the wheel high enough for lowering and mounting. You probably could find a more lighter floor jack, but make sure it's lifting travel is adequate for the job!

Haven't done a tire change jet (4k on the clock) but I am very confident that it will work very nicely.
So there you have it. I attached some pics so you get the idea!
 

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I have had a J&S for 6 or 7 years for my Wide Glide and it works great. Haven't tried it with the Chief yet though. Was thinking of investing in a table from Harbor Freight.
 

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After some extensive comparison, I narrowed it down to the PitBull and the J&S lift. Yeah, they're more expensive than the Craftsman, Harbor Freight and other Chinese offerings but they're much better built and sturdier and my primary consideration was stability and safety once the bike was up on the lift. I ended up purchasing the J&S lift to use on my Gilroy Chief because it does just about everything the PitBull does and it's much lighter and less expensive. It's an awesome lift, quality built, easy to operate and most importantly, my scoot is as stable as a rock while cleaning and performing maintenance. It's also easy to store, takes up minimal room in the garage and I keep the bike on it when not riding. There are a lot of nice (and cheap) motorcycle lifts on the market but I have no regrets with the J&S lift.
 

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J&S has an adaptor for their lift that is necessary for an Indian. It costs $39. I have used the J&S for years. It is a great lift.
Yeah I have that for my lift but am concerned about their Tire/wheel chock working with the big fender and they are trying to figure out if it will work or not. I have used their lift and chock with my HD for years.
 
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