Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone used one on a Scout or Sixty? I suspect that it's just a matter of determining the bar inside diameter, and sourcing the proper kit. I have an inquiry in to them, but if I don't hear, I'll take the measurements and see what I can find out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
I use Atlas. Works well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ScotD

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,620 Posts
Has anyone used one on a Scout or Sixty? I suspect that it's just a matter of determining the bar inside diameter, and sourcing the proper kit. I have an inquiry in to them, but if I don't hear, I'll take the measurements and see what I can find out.
Let Fred Fisher at Marker Machine (they do the ThrottleMeister) know what you need. I assume you are using this email address?...[email protected]

Fred made kits for my Moto Guzzi Griso and my wife's V7 Special. Been using their Throttlemeister's for years and like the quality and options. Let us know what you find out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,397 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,397 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Let Fred Fisher at Marker Machine (they do the ThrottleMeister) know what you need. I assume you are using this email address?...[email protected]

Fred made kits for my Moto Guzzi Griso and my wife's V7 Special. Been using their Throttlemeister's for years and like the quality and options. Let us know what you find out.
I did email that address. Fred's...casual about responding. It's a simple device, but very well made. I suspect that ours will be an easy fitment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Is there a website for their products? I have been on the fence about getting an Atlas and open to other options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
That's what I found too. I've got an email to them, but as I said, they're kinda casual about responding. They're very reliable on the phone. I'm going to pull my grips over the weekend and see what the inside diameter of the bars is, and whether there's any impediment to the normal attachment scheme. Then, I'll contact them with those dimensions and see what we come up with. Essentially, I'm being their beta tester...without their knowing. If you want to email them an inquiry, that'll be the second this week...maybe they'll move on their own Either way, I should have some info for the collective in a bit.

HTH!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,620 Posts
That's what I found too. I've got an email to them, but as I said, they're kinda casual about responding. They're very reliable on the phone. I'm going to pull my grips over the weekend and see what the inside diameter of the bars is, and whether there's any impediment to the normal attachment scheme. Then, I'll contact them with those dimensions and see what we come up with. Essentially, I'm being their beta tester...without their knowing. If you want to email them an inquiry, that'll be the second this week...maybe they'll move on their own Either way, I should have some info for the collective in a bit.

HTH!
FYI...when I was working with Fred on the Moto Guzzi Throttlemeisters, he asked for a photo of the of the end of the bar with the bar-end removed. I gave him the the bar O.D. and the bolt size that is used to hold the bar-end. Not sure if this helps you or not, but might save you some time as you work on developing a fit for your bike. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Similar process when I worked with him on the Triumph 675; the difference there was that they didn't or couldn't work with the small bolt on the bar-end; the insert had to come out. There not being bar-ends on the Scout, it should not be involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Well, as sort of an update/teaser, I worked out the correct combination with Throttlemeister, and have it in hand and installed. I've taken a wad of pics, but have to edit them down to post. Pics and writeup to follow, then ride report!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Okay! Since I've managed to do a lot of non-riding things over the Labor Day weekend so far, let me at least contribute to the community here. First, this would be a simpler process if you do the install with grips other than OE. It would also be easy to do when you do the install of aftermarket grips. Unless the dressy chrome type grips come with open ends, the Throttlemeister will not work with them. Sorry.

I contacted Fred at Throttlemeister, and provided him with the inside diameter of the Scout bars, which is 19mm/.75". Armed with that, they assembled a kit. They'll have a specific number once we get things confirmed. You get the option of the normal or 'heavy" version, in five finishes: Brushed stainless, polished, black, milled black with silver accents, or black with blacked out accents. I went with heavy, black with silver milled. What you get is this:

BTW: In case it isn't obvious, all but the last two pictures are thumbnails. Click for the bigger versions.

TMBoxA.jpg Parts_2A.JPG

On the left is the clutch side matching bar-end weight. On the right is the Throttlemeister. All the pieces are top-quality stainless, except for the bronze bushing that contacts the grip to make the TM work. Missing from my kit was the friction sleeve, which I'll show you later. Fortunately I had one on hand from a previous application.

When you assemble them, the stainless bushing goes inside the recess of the bar-ends, and the screws go into the long insert pieces. Here they are pre-assembled

PreAssembledA.jpg

What you'll need is: A 3/4" hole saw or other way to cut the hole in the end of the grip, an X-Acto knife, and a 6mm Allen wrench. For final assembly, you'll want a torque wrench.

First, cut the holes in the grips: Note: If you're installing new grips, cutting the hole is stone easy: Remove the OE grips. Slide the throttle side grip onto the clutch side bar. Hold it in place, and give the grip a solid rap with a hammer or a rubber mallet. This will let the end of the bar act as a cookie cutter and punch a perfect-sized hole in the grip. Pull it off, put the left side grip in place and repeat. Then you can permanently install the new grips.

Hole_SawA.jpg First_HoleA.jpg

This is pretty much all you'll need to do on the clutch side, as the unit slips in flush with the end of the grip and is snugged in place. Pics later. Most of the rest of the story involves the throttle side.

When I put the insert in place, I discovered that the grip was still snug (meaning that the throttle wouldn't turn freely.

Snug1A.jpg

I cut some of the rubber away, and although better, it still didn't work the way I wanted.

StillSnug1A.jpg

I got it cut away, and the throttle would snap shut. But the end of the grip was too stiff to fold back over the throttle tube to insert the friction sleeve (as in the instructions). But, I thought perhaps the end of the grip would offer enough bite for the bushing that the TM would operate properly. No such luck. No matter how close I put the TM to the grip, the throttle would still close. So, I looked at the inside of the grip and decided that if I cut away that flat on the end of the grip, I could roll it back to install the friction sleeve. My cut line was that "seam" at the bevel before the end of the grip:

CutLine_1A.jpg

That provided a clear pattern to cut with the X-Acto. A good sharp razor blade or box cutter would also probably work. This is what I ended up removing:

Removed_A.jpg

This let me insert a small screwdriver under the grip to break the spots of adhesive. You have to roll it back partway, where you discover a ridge in the throttle tube. Again, there are spots of adhesive on the inboard side of that ridge. Break those, and roll the grip back a little more. This will give you room to slide the friction sleeve onto the tube.

T_Tube3A.jpg T_Tube1A.jpg

You slide the sleeve onto the throttle tube until a lip on the inside contacts the end of the tube:

Sleeve_2A.jpg

Then you roll the grip back over the friction sleeve:

Sleeve_in_PlaceA.jpg

Now, what you need to do is position the combination of the insert and the TM unit such that when it's not activated, the throttle snaps shut without resistance. They suggest a starting point of 1/16". This pic is from when I tried to get it to work without the sleeve, but you get the idea: You can see the retracted bushing just inboard of the TM itself.

Gap2A.jpg

This part is fiddly. Similar to belt adjustment, where tightening the axle changes tension, when you snug down the fitting screw, the position of the assembly can change. Be patient and you'll get it located such that when fully deployed the throttle doesn't close and when fully deactivated it snaps shut just like it wasn't there. Once you find that spot, carefully remove the screw, put a drop or two of the supplied blue Loctite on the threads and tighten to 8-10 Ft.Lbs. That's tighter than you might think, but you don't want to drop a 14 ounce stainless projectile into traffic (not to mention lose a nice accessory). If you haven't already, slide the left side assembly in flush with the grip, and tighten in place, also using Loctite.

At this point, step back and admire your handiwork:

ClutchSide_1A.jpg


Installed_A.jpg


I really like the appearance of the black/milled on the Scout. I have not had a chance to ride with it yet, but my experience on several motorcycles has been uniformly positive. The people at Throttlemeister are good to work with before and after the sale. I ordered on Monday, and had it in my mailbox on Wednesday.

Hope that this is helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Okay. I suppose that install info is one thing, but a ride report might be better, yes?

Did about 100 miles on 'er today. I've a funny story about the start, which I'll post up elsewhere, but...

My three reasons to be interested in the Throttlemeister were:
1) Being able to take my hand off the bar occasionally to rest (duh),
2) Wanting it to be easier to hold a steady throttle when rolling down the highway, particularly at higher speeds, and
3) Wanting to occasionally slow the movement of the throttle

#1 is self explanatory, and to answer whether it works--Absolutely. Properly adjusted and installed, when deployed, you can have zero (or as I set it virtually zero) throttle return.

ASIDE: It isn't necessary to comment on the safety of throttle locking devices. We're adults here. If you don't think it's safe, don't buy one.

#2- With the wind blast at 60 MPH+ I had a tendency to either lose focus or lose grip, or just subconsciously want to slow down. That made it a pain to maintain highway speed when the speed limit was 65-70. Partially engaging the Throttlemeister made it easier to hold a steady speed. Yes, it makes it somewhat harder to accelerate quickly, and you have to more positively close the throttle when you need to. I've used variations of the TM for a long time, so it's second nature now.

#3- The Scout throttle isn't twitchy per se, but it is sensitive. As a result, sometimes I'd find myself making small annoying adjustments, such as on winding but not tight roads. Adding just a little friction helped in this instance as well.

#4- Wait, I didn't mention a #4... Well, no, I didn't. But a bonus of the Throttlemeister is the 14 ounces of weight at the end of the bar. This results in a modest but noticeable reduction of vibration to your hands. Nice. I'll avoid mentioning a fifth item, but I'll say that I like the way they look, especially since the Scout is the only bike I've ridden in ages that didn't have some sort of bar-end, so that no longer looks odd.

I'll be reporting to the manufacturer tomorrow, so if you're interested, you should be able to order up.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
I looked at the throttlemeister web site and didn't see anything for the scout. Am I not looking in the right place. Do you have a part number?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top