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My Tech said my throttle bodies were, in fact, out of synch.
[...]
Here is what he told me to do if they get out of synch again: kill switch off. Power switch on and don’t touch anything for about 35 seconds (actually, until you no longer hear anything from the bike). Then power switch off. Wait a few seconds, power switch back on, don’t touch anything for three minutes. Power switch off again, and the next time you ride, it should be in synch.
I don't get it, the throttle bodies are mechanically connected. (see this diagram) No 35 second procedure can change that...
 

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I don't get it, the throttle bodies are mechanically connected. (see this diagram) No 35 second procedure can change that...
Just repeating what my Tech told me. He said the throttle (twist grip) and the throttle bodies have to synch, so the computer knows exactly where the throttle position is. I didn't get in the weeds with him, I just wanted to ride for the rest of the day and the sun was getting low on the horizon when I left the dealership. Seemed to be a lot better the rest of the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I will say that as I continue to ride the bike and get used to it, it continues to get better. There are still some issues of idle hunting when stopped, but in general it is improving.
 

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Just repeating what my Tech told me. He said the throttle (twist grip) and the throttle bodies have to synch, so the computer knows exactly where the throttle position is. I didn't get in the weeds with him, I just wanted to ride for the rest of the day and the sun was getting low on the horizon when I left the dealership. Seemed to be a lot better the rest of the day.
I would agree with the throttle and the rest of the systems. The procedure you mentioned sounds more like a re-learn and with this info sounds like what happened. A true throttle body sync requires vacuum gauges and adjusting some screws. It used to be a fairly standard process that's been forgotten with the newer bikes. I think that's why it was so surprising when @Holeshot Mike brought it up and started fixing bikes with it.
 

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I'm a little bit surprised that the throttle plates aren't on the same shaft the way they were on the Victory Freedom engines, pretty much like a two barrel carburetor used to be. To have two separate throttle bodies that aren't necessarily synchronized with two separate stepper motor actuators seems more complicated than it needed to be. At least to my little old pea brain anyhow.
 

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One stepper motor operates both, and I bet there’s only only one throttle position sensor as well (on the rear throttle body). They’re mechanically lnked with a rod/arm.

612272
 

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My challenger has had issues with it's throttle feel since day one. Too much and unpredictable take up when giving it throttle with bad surging at low throttle and lower rpm's. It recently had the check engine light come on with an O2 sensor code. They found an issue with the O2 sensor and replaced it. The also performed the base throttle procedure so the ECM know's the parameters of the throttle grip sensor. The reflashed the ECM with the update for this. The throttle works 1000% better. Vast improvement. Not perfect but much better.
 

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Thanks for the diagrams and information regarding the throttle body linkage and it's operation. Is there some kind of adjustment in that linkage to get those throttle plates synched?
 

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Yes there is, looking at the drawing there is an adjuster on the front throttle body.

(And I wouldn’t be surprised if there are “set for life” )
 

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Yes there is, looking at the drawing there is an adjuster on the front throttle body.

(And I wouldn’t be surprised if there are “set for life” )
The adjusting screw is loctited but it's still adjustable ... you don't have to move that screw very far at all to make a pretty dramatic difference in the sync .. Just Sayin
 

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Just crossed 4000 miles (purchased in November new). Throttle lag remains as is a concern. Almost always run in sport mode, but have tried all. Still stock and wanting a "smoother consistent" throttle transition. Fixes ?????
 

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With these new bikes and their computer systems. It takes up to 2k miles of breaking in for it to learn your throttle habits. Having it in sport mode will always give you the crispiest throttle response. But it does still need to go through it's learning experience first. It will get better with time.
Beg to differ, this is my 30+ motorcycle and none (3 fuel injected currently) have had this delay in throttle response. This is a soft ware issue that Indian needs to address. I ride aggressively (4k miles in last 2 months) and still the hesitation remains, so I blip the throttle all the time off idle to supplement the issue for now... ;)
 

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Can you explain what you mean by throttle lag? The only thing I've experienced is a "dead spot" where a turn seems to do nothing. That only happens if I happen to have my hand on the handlebars when I start the bike.
 
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I think some of this issue and whatever you want to call it...throttle lag, soft response, dead spot, throttle hesitation, etc....but I believe it's in the PROGRAM of the bike until the computer catches up with the air/fuel mixtures to maintain EMISSIONS compliance. When you twist the throttle you are loading up the cylinders with fuel. The ECU senses that and restricts the burn/throttle in the form of a dead spot/lag/hesitation......again to insure that you're not loading up your cat converter with "excess" fuel that it can't burn. An aftermarket tuner should be able to eliminate that perhaps at the expense of burning a little bit more fuel. Most new autos and trucks do that as well......all because of BIG Brother!!!!
 

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You're not loading up the cylinders with fuel (the ecu is actually in charge of that). When you open up the throttle your tbw sends a different requested throttle value to the ecu, and the ecu should simply do its work. Open the throttle butterflies, change ignition timing and inject fuel at the right moment. All based on loads of computer calculations in near real-time and reading tens/hundreds of lookup tables.

Change those and the bike runs better (or worse).
 

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You're not loading up the cylinders with fuel (the ecu is actually in charge of that). When you open up the throttle your tbw sends a different requested throttle value to the ecu, and the ecu should simply do its work. Open the throttle butterflies, change ignition timing and inject fuel at the right moment. All based on loads of computer calculations in near real-time and reading tens/hundreds of lookup tables.

Change those and the bike runs better (or worse).
Max, you're right....my bad...but same end symptom. I'm still an old skool guy thinking that when you twist your throttle/floor your accelerator, you're loading up the cylinders. But the end result is the same here....the computer is "dialing" this event back.....thereby giving the rider that flat/soft spot in the throttle.
 

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I agree that the ECU seems to do something very undesired. Even some testers / journalists complained about throttle lag.
 
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