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this is why i do all of my own work

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soooooo wen i bought my 2017 springfield {my second one} the dealer did a service on it and now that it hit 9800 miles i wanted to get the shitty indian oil out of it as i put 2500 or so miles on it. so here we go, i hadda put a one foot breaker bar on the allen wrench with a lotta oommph to crack the drain plugs loose so much so they made a snapping sound as they broke free. i find it totally amazing that the threads did not strip out, i got lucky and i knew wen i got to the oil filter i was gonna have a problem and guess wut....i was right. being that it was the short filter [indian brand] i could not get my filter tool in there to loosen it and even if i did it was so tight i hadda crush the filter with channel locks to get a grip and got it off. i mean common sense you dumb ass indian would be techs if that guy worked for me he would be fired on the spot. WHY CANT THESE DEALERS HIRE COMPETENT PEOPLE. ok rant over.
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My theory is if it’s something you know how to do (or something you can learn) you’ll usually do a better job than someone you hire. Some of my “experiences” with dealership service: improper belt tension after tire change, tech forgot to tighten front axle pinch bolts after tire change, tech didn’t use solvent to clean wheel before applying wheel weights - next day they had fallen off on garage floor, scratched fender (happened twice) while putting seat on, etc.
 

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i have been building cars, bikes and wut have you for over 50 years, and wen i do it i
NEVER have these problems, seems like some of you are trying to justify these morons incompetence. yes people do screw up, i know i have but how many others complained on this site about the same thing.
You've been working on stuff for 50 years and NEVER had a problem? Surely you have made mistakes, just like everyone else on the planet...
 

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My theory is if it’s something you know how to do (or something you can learn) you’ll usually do a better job than someone you hire. Some of my “experiences” with dealership service: improper belt tension after tire change, tech forgot to tighten front axle pinch bolts after tire change, tech didn’t use solvent to clean wheel before applying wheel weights - next day they had fallen off on garage floor, scratched fender (happened twice) while putting seat on, etc.
Agreed
The entire industry has moved away from mechanics or competent repairmen. These people are highly trained and command top dollar. The Auto/Motorcycle industry came up with Techs. Techs are non-mechanics that are trained to do specific tasks and follow specific procedures. It is much cheaper to pay them. The medical industry has also gone to this to eliminate the higher paying nursing jobs.

Thats why these techs have to consult the mothership about an issue, because they don't have the knowledge, or experience to troubleshoot and come up with the solution on their own.

Remember the throttle body sync issue on the challengers? A real mechanic at an Indian dealership discovered this and had to teach Polaris about this.
 

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IMO, from what I have seen is that at Indian dealerships is that the techs or mechanics that were there were ( previously) working on Victorys ,along with Polaris four wheelers, UTVs, slingshot 3-wheelers, etc.- before Indian came along. There in lies the problem. Too spread out -and not enough (specific vehicle) training. Indian could/should have their own stand alone shops/dealers. Polaris is just not big enough to do it that way. Polaris has had stand alone ATV/ UTVs dealerships. These are more profitable than their motorcycle line ( Indian). I do my own work as I have wrenched on vehicles for over 50 yrs too. No excuse for sloppy maintenance work (non- technical) at a dealership as that is about the same type work on all vehicles. FYI. I have seen several dealerships display few or several techical training plaques ( w/name of person(s) trained) and that person hasn’t worked there in yrs. Dealer keeps these on display to make customers feel better I guess. Actually they may have one or none working there at present time that have been awarded training completion and/or a plaque.
 

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There is no excuse for tighting drain plugs excessively.
We’ve got two threads (no pun) going right now from guys who have stripped out their drain plugs. Over the years I have seen a number of these cautionary threads. The Indian oil pans are notoriously soft ~~ and new pans are like $1500. Some of the guys have used torque wrenches and still get em stripped. “Finger tight plus 1/4 turn” seems to be the best advice.

Here‘s just one example but we’ve got threads going back to 2015 on this topic:

 

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Because you are working with two dissimilar metals [iron or steel and aluminum] which have different expansion rates, you have to allow em to cool off somewhat BEFORE attemnpting to break em free, other wise,you'll either break one of em,or striip the threads right out of the aluminum piece.But the good news is,you can replace those threads with a "HELI -COIL" which usually comes as a kit with the heli coils and tap to recut the damaged threads,and are now available at most auto parts and hardware stores,and, in both,SAE and METRIC sizes.

And then,when you reassemble,you apply COPPER NEVER SEIZE,NOT the conventional Never Seize,on to the threads so that doesn't happen again.And yes,it does make a difference. because the next guy that takes it apart just might be you!! :unsure: :unsure:
 

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FYI: There is a oil filter wrench [or big socket if you will ] to fit on the end of the Wix 51358 filter and uses a 3/8 drive racket.It makes the filter change a piece of cake to do.[no slipping ,crushing,or rounding the ends of the filter] The one I have is a KD#3255 ,just in case you're interested and does NOT cost an unholy fortune to buy.
 

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Here's a trick that I use to removed over-tightened filters that I have run across. (namely, h-d big twins namely that someone else has mangled by attempting to remove first)

I use a metal 3/8 drive cap wrench (it has to be metal cap wrench, not a plastic cap wrench) and some self-tapping screws. (I use 3/8" x 1-1/4" self-tapping screws) Drill 4 holes into the end of the cap wrench 90° apart. The holes need to be big enough to allow the self-tapping screws to be inserted into the holes.

Place the 3/8 drive cap wrench onto the end of the filter. I then use a cordless impact driver to start the screws into the end of the oil filter until it pierces through the filter housing. I finish tightening them by hand with a wrench until the screw head is against the cap wrench. I usually start with two screws 180° apart. Then, using a 3/8 ratchet, I loosen the filter. (if the filter housing starts to tear, I stop and add two more screws into the other holes)

This trick has worked great for removing damaged filters.
 

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Sounds good.But,I still think if ya use the filter wrench/socket like I have [if your filter has the provision for it,most filters now do] it will work a lot better. Ya won't over tighten it when putting it on,,and it will definitely break the filter free when and if it tightened up from motor vibration,which is quite common. (y)
 
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