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© Triumph 2.5 liters of British power.
There are some things nobody needs in this world, and a motorcycle with a huge 2,458 cc engine is one of them. That’s what powers the new Triumph Rocket 3 TFC (Triumph Factory Custom), which sets a new record for the largest engine in a production motorcycle


  • Engine: 2,458 cc in-line triple
  • MSRP: $29,000
  • Available: December 2019
For context, Genesis makes a sport sedan, the G70, with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine-that’s 2,000cc of displacement. With a turbocharger, that car produces decent power for moving over 3,500 pounds of metal and leather and driver, with a zero-to-60 time of 6.5 seconds. Triumph hasn’t stated the exact weight of the Rocket 3, but it will be lighter than it’s 800-pound predecessor. Whatever that number, paired with 163 ft-lbs of torque, means involuntary burnouts on the 240mm rear tire.

Actually, not always. Bikes this overpowered sound intimidating, but like modern supercars, electronics will intervene before catastrophe. The Rocket 3 TFC has multiple riding modes that can keep power in check when roads are wet, anti-lock brakes, and traction control, plus Brembo Stylemas brakes for stopping power. The new Rocket also gets all of Triumph’s modern electronics-a digital dash that syncs to your phone, GoPro connectivity, keyless ignition, LED headlights, cruise control, and USB charging port.

© Triumph The Rocket 3 TFC’s three-cylinder engine produces 163 ft-lbs of torque.
Since the first Rocket 3 came out in 2004, this model has held the superlative of largest production motorcycle engine-low-production custom bikes have gone bigger, but the Rocket has been the biggest you could go buy at a dealership. However, Triumph is only selling 750 examples (with 225 coming to North America) of the new Rocket 3 TFC.
 

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© Triumph 2.5 liters of British power.
There are some things nobody needs in this world, and a motorcycle with a huge 2,458 cc engine is one of them. That’s what powers the new Triumph Rocket 3 TFC (Triumph Factory Custom), which sets a new record for the largest engine in a production motorcycle


  • Engine: 2,458 cc in-line triple
  • MSRP: $29,000
  • Available: December 2019
For context, Genesis makes a sport sedan, the G70, with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine-that’s 2,000cc of displacement. With a turbocharger, that car produces decent power for moving over 3,500 pounds of metal and leather and driver, with a zero-to-60 time of 6.5 seconds. Triumph hasn’t stated the exact weight of the Rocket 3, but it will be lighter than it’s 800-pound predecessor. Whatever that number, paired with 163 ft-lbs of torque, means involuntary burnouts on the 240mm rear tire.

Actually, not always. Bikes this overpowered sound intimidating, but like modern supercars, electronics will intervene before catastrophe. The Rocket 3 TFC has multiple riding modes that can keep power in check when roads are wet, anti-lock brakes, and traction control, plus Brembo Stylemas brakes for stopping power. The new Rocket also gets all of Triumph’s modern electronics-a digital dash that syncs to your phone, GoPro connectivity, keyless ignition, LED headlights, cruise control, and USB charging port.

© Triumph The Rocket 3 TFC’s three-cylinder engine produces 163 ft-lbs of torque.
Since the first Rocket 3 came out in 2004, this model has held the superlative of largest production motorcycle engine-low-production custom bikes have gone bigger, but the Rocket has been the biggest you could go buy at a dealership. However, Triumph is only selling 750 examples (with 225 coming to North America) of the new Rocket 3 TFC.
That will kick a--
 

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Wicked cool, and impressive, to me. Butt to some on the Rocket site?...not so much, considering the smallish amount of Tq & HP gains compared to what the 2018 Rockets and older 2300 CC's have. And the price, holy the cow!! 2018 and earlier R3 Roadsters could be had for as little as $10Gs (plus tax and the other bla bla bla). That said, the new & improved model has much tech gadgetry, that allot will like. But from what I read, lots/most of the hard core Rocket pilots aren't running to the Triumph store to try to buy one.
 

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It's nice, but for one third the price of a new Rocket III I'd just get a nice, used example of one of these...200 hp on the cheap (relatively).
2000000108.jpg
 

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The new R3 will be around 70kg lighter than the old one. I did a factory tour a few months ago and saw the crankcases and barrels being prepared for machining, and we were shown an old set for comparison.
 

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So much of this article is simply not true and easily proven wrong.
Ladies and gentlemen, I present the Boss Hoss. Up to 500 cubic inches of Chevy V8 engine in a production, dealer stocked motorcycle.

Who wrote this Triumph article? I'd like to send him or her this picture of a Boss Hoss showroom...
IMG_0021.JPG
 

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I had a 2014 paid $14,500 new. That price makes no sense there was never a huge market for that bike in the first place. Motor was the only cool thing about the bike so I didnt keep it long.
 

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I had a 2014 paid $14,500 new. That price makes no sense there was never a huge market for that bike in the first place. Motor was the only cool thing about the bike so I didnt keep it long.
Also, you can pick up a decent used,1st gen Rocket for $7-8000 these days.
 

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Wonder what the top speed of that beast will be? I don’t think I’d take it there no matter what it turned out to be.

Bubba
 

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Wonder what the top speed of that beast will be? I don’t think I’d take it there no matter what it turned out to be.

Bubba
Usually, hyper powered non-sportbikes are speed-restricted to something like 140-150 mph, maybe even less. I know from riding my BMW S1000R that speeds much above about 130 on a 'naked' sportbike can be far from fun. The bike weighed next to nothing, and had 165 hp to play with. On the only occasion that I took it above 130 on the interstate, it was very unstable feeling, and pretty scary. I've ridden Hayabusas up to about 160, and that kind of bike is amazingly stable at higher speeds by comparison to a more 'open' machine.

The new Rocket will be a relatively long-wheelbase, heavy bike, and that will help it's stability at speed, but just hanging on in a 150 windblast is more entertainment than most would care for, even me.

In short, they won't allow it to go 150, regardless of it's raw power to do so, and probably beyond.....but damn! the acceleration up to that should be epic.

If I recall correctly, the old, first generation, 1200 V-Max has a theoretical higher top speed than the second generation, 1700cc, 200hp, monster-max that replaced it.

I can remember in road tests, the old 1200 max could touch, or exceed 150 on a good day, while the 1700 was speed restricted to about 143.

No matter, an occasional sprint up to an actual130-150 mph on a motorcycle is crazy enough for most.
 

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140-150 is way more than I want ride too. I realized a long time ago that I was mortal and don’t want to test that theory again.

Bubba
 

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140-150 is way more than I want ride too. I realized a long time ago that I was mortal and don’t want to test that theory again.

Bubba
Consider that I owned a Hayabusa for three years and 36,000 miles, and I never once attempted to 'top it out'. Although there definitely is the temptation to do something like that, but the thought of really trying it was terrifying, especially after seeing 170 on the speedo once (which calculated to be an actual 155 after factoring the speedo error), and knowing that the bike, being an early, unrestricted, 2000 model, was capable of an actual 190, or even a bit more, was just too much for my little brain to deal with. It's truly amazing how narrow a rural two-lane highway becomes at speeds of 150 and above.
 
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