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While it sounds a bit obvious, make sure you and the bike are a fit. I would have a Scout as a second bike but we are not a great fit physically but it would be fine for the shorter trips and quick run to the store. If you fit well and feel comfortable you will lear more without as many not so good habits. My main ride is a Roadmaster. Pull the trunk and it is a Chieftan with a couple upgrades.
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
How about a MOTORCYCLE SAFETY CLASS first? Yeah, you'll ride a small bike in class, learn to ride properly, and see if you can handle that first. YOUR SIZE doesn't matter as much as the size of the bike. A big bike is harder to maneuver at low speeds. So the Bobber as a first Indian is not a bad idea but the used bike is probably the BEST idea. There is no substitute for time in the saddle.
 

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Whatever you decide, pick something that makes you smile when you look at it. Motorcycles are works of art, and can create a spark of joy whether a “cheap-starter” or a spendy-boutique model.
Safety course is paramount, and will give you the fundamentals to build your skills on. After riding for 25 years, I purchased a scout abs recently, and at 6’, 190lb, I could see how you may need some adjustments to get more room on the ride, but this bike could easily be my “forever-bike”.
go easy on that throttle, enjoy the wind in your face, and put those miles under them tires. Welcome to some of the happiest trails you’ll ever mosey on planet earth. 🙏🎶
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
My first bike was a Scout 60 which is the same size as the Bobber, but with a little less power. There will be plenty of people telling you to start with a smaller bike, but if you take a riders training course beforehand you should be just fine. Just take your time getting comfortable with your bike. Do take a course though. It will teach you a lot of good habits that you will use throughout your riding career.

There are reasons you might want to consider another bike though. Indians are not cheap for a starter bike. The Scout is not bad if you're on a budget, but you can get cheaper bikes from other manufacturers. Also, if you just want to try riding but aren't sure about it long term a cheaper entry model bike might suit you better. You can always trade up later. If you are entertaining the idea of a sport bike then take a test drive on one of those too so you can compare it to a cruiser.

Regarding your size, see if the dealer has a model with the extended reach controls that you can test drive. It should give you some extra room to stretch out. I had the opposite concern at 5'5". I had them install the reduced reach controls and handlebars, and it fit perfectly.

Edit: If you're worried about dropping your bike you can always invest in some highway bars while you're getting comfortable. I haven't dropped my bike yet, but nearly did when I forgot to drop the kickstand when I stopped for gas. The highway bars kept the bike from going down and I was able to wrestle it back to vertical. Best add-on I've ever purchased.
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Hey WVBilly, The scout or scout bobber may be the right choice for you. I'm 6'2" and 260 myself. The difference between them mainly is the ride height. The scout bobber only has 2" of rear shock travel. It's damned near like riding a hard tail. Not very comfortable. I just slapped the progressive 444 shocks on and got them on sale at RevZilla (saved about $150). The Scout has 3" of travel so will ride a little nicer but may still need aftermarket shocks. The seat on the scout bobber is crap. I got a Corbin Brave and love it! Definitely worth the investment. I also moved my foot pegs 4" forward and it makes a huge difference in riding comfort. I used the Free Spirit forward control adapter plates (about $130). I had to replace the stock rear brake line with a longer one from Barnett. Don't believe the Free Spirit website. If your bike doesn't have California emissions, you WILL need the longer brake lines. I got mine from Barnett for about $100. Hope this helps you make your decision. I recommend the scout bobber because it has more than enough power but is still very tame and manageable under 4k rpm. Above 4k is where the fun really starts to happen!

Ride Safe!
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I am the Exact person to advice you on this!!
I went in 2016 to buy my first bike and I was looking for a Scout. My Lady was with me thank God and told me I look like a Circus Bear on it so I bought the Chief Dark Horse. It was THE best decision I’ve EVER made! You and I are the exact same size so trust me, you don’t want a Scout.
The Chief is a powerful bike of course but it also it really stable and DOES go slow!
If you take a rider course to learn the basics, RESPECT the bike and use common sense Bro you’ll absolutely not only be fine but thank me every time you look at your bad ass bike!
 

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Let me be the FIRST person here to say that I disagree with almost every post here. Respect, learning curve, and rider safety is a state of mind and attitude. You can be just a safe on a powerful heavy bikes as you can an underpowered light top heavy anything. People die every day on lightweight 250cc bikes and smaller---heck people die on mopeds because of playing the fool or just not understanding how to be safe on a motorcycle. That is not the fault of the motorcycle.. NOT SAYING THE BIKES MENTIONED HERE ARE ALL OF THAT. I personally find smaller, lighter metric bikes are harder to ride. JMHO of course. The 2 best balanced and easiest to ride motorcycles I have owned is a Honda F6B and Victory Cross Roads. When I went from the smaller Hondas to my first Harleys, I was amazed at the ease a well balanced and solid cruiser handled---much better than the "learner" bikes. Now understand we are talking 4 decades ago. I have dropped a bike twice since 1978 and once was trying to get off in a hurry and forgot the kickstand. The other was trying to get off the road before getting rear ended, and after getting on the gravel locking the brakes to keep from going head on into a ditch. Before getting flamed by everyone on the4 thread, let me repeat----How quickly do you learn. I learned how to ride on a cold rainy night in February 1977 after paying cash for my new Honda XL125 and knew nobody to get it home for me. To add to the fact of how stupid I was, I rode it home with no eye protection wearing a yellow wind breaker in a 45 degree mist in the dark. I am not suggesting you do any of that---only that within 3 weeks I knew the 125 was not the bike for me and I had made a mistake.


Here is my suggestion: After taking the motorcycle course, determine where you stand as far as ability. Did you learn and become proficient quickly? Be honest with yourself! If not then maybe a cheap dirt bike will teach you what you need to know. OR----if you choose to spend thousands on something you don't really want as a "just in case", then that is fine, too. I find my Scout Bobber as a very easy to ride machine---very solid, but light and nimble.

In answer to the original post---I am 6'1" , 32" inseam and 240 lbs and NO, the Bobber is NOT to small, but in my case I had to get a custom Corbin seat, different bars, and 80mm foot control extenders to make the bike fit me. The stock configuration will be very cramped for you. A standard Scout is more adaptable, but does not have near the "Cool Factor" as the Bobber.:LOL:(y) View attachment 631949
Here's my take for what it is worth.
Motorcycling can be and is a dangerous pastime and more often than not, it won't be your fault when you get into trouble AND when you do your survival will depend on your reaction and skill to a great extent plus your skin, head and general body protection. I've been riding since 1966 legally and for a few years before on farm bikes. My two accidents were not my fault. First one, I hit dog that ran out of a driveway at high speed and I hardly had time to react. The second accident was when a driver turned in front of me at a set of traffic lights and I had nowhere to go. On both occasions, I was dressed for the occasion and suffered minimal injuries. Dislocated shoulder as a result of a high-side spill and a few bruises and cuts. My protective gear saved me heaps of pain and suffering. I NEVER ride without protective gear and I suggest that you don't either. Being cool isn't the object of biking; staying alive and healthy is.
I can say this with all certainty. You WILL have an accident at some stage, it will be a forgetful incident when the side-stand wasn't down correctly, or some cager didn't see you because he/she is off his/her face on drugs or a cell phone.
I'm a clear advocate for starting on something smaller than an Indian or Harley, however, make sure that whatever you decide on fits you; don't try to adapt to the bike. There is a world-full of OEM and aftermarket parts/accessories to make sure the bike is comfortable and manageable for you. Finally, enjoy the experience as so many of us do.
Sage advice from a 76 year old. Cheers, Bill
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Indian Scout,69ci
 

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Like 4 Inch pistons, take a motorcycle safety class first. This should be a sniff test on your abilities. You will have greater understanding of your abilities after you take the instruction and practice your skills. I wish you well!
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
 

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A considerable amount of good advice has been provided above. When I started riding so many years ago my mentor had me use an older, lighter weight motorcycle and on the first day of instruction he had me stand next to the bike and let it fall onto its side. He said, you will on occasion drop your bike when mounting it, you will certainly drop your bike when learning and practicing slow speed turns through cones. It was his opinion I learned not to be afraid of dropping the bike. He then taught me the correct way of picking the bike up. So, when we practiced very slow speed maneuvers, I was not overly concerned about bike damage and I learned not to put my feet down during a slow speed fall. (This became especially important when I started riding 900 pond bikes) That process taught me how to use the clutch more effectively at slow speeds and how to use the rear brake to assist a slow speed turn.

My advice is contained in some of the other posts, However a personal recap: Get an older inexpensive bike for learning on, one that you won't mind slow speed fall-overs on. Find a good motorcycle instructor who can spend time on very slow speed maneuvers as well as general safety. Once you are comfortable with intense slow speed cone work and then higher speed maneuvers, test ride a bunch of bikes for size, style, and fit. I would test ride Hondas, Harleys, Yamahas, BMWs and definitely Indians. I think you will find "The Bike" that just says "It Is Me"

Good Luck.
 

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I agree with the advice to look at a larger model based on your size. I am a little shorter than you and find the scout a little cramped after a short time on it. I ride a chieftain but would suggest testing the new Chief. I have one additional suggestion. If you have no riding experience, you might consider a good used bike of any quality brand to learn on. It is almost certain you will drop your bike as you learn. Dropping a new one is a very sad and sometimes expensive experience.
 

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Similar to @zee advise I drove Yamaha vStar 250, now I am planning to hop on Indian, but again I am 5.4' hence vStar 250 is not for you. You need a little bigger bike but a old one.
The scout should work for you as a next bike, but it will be a hell of a lot more powerful than that v-star 250
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I would first take a rider course and get some experience in a controlled environment, for me, I got a Honda shadow and rode that for a year, before I jumped up to a bigger bike, I have a Indian Springfield now and so glad I had the experience on a smaller bike, just my two cents
 

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i like the Yamaha v-star 900 as a first bike for a beginner as you can find used at a reasonable price and it gets a better insurance rate because its under 1000cc and will help as a new rider. I would also today recommend the rider safety class, see who your dealer recommends. My v-star 1100 was a bigger bike than the scout even though smaller engine, 620lbs. I actually started out on a Honda CB350F, many years ago, sorry i sold that bike
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I agree with Zee. He has great points. I weigh more than you do and have the regular scout. I love it more than the Fatboy I had before. Great first bike and great not first bike. Aftermarket is catching up as well.
632343
 

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I am 6'1 260 and fit on scout fine, easy by me to ride... Though like others I started smaller on a used yamaha 650 bought it used with 1,800 miles for $2,000 rode it for 3 years and got $1,800 for to bed my scout. If you need a little more room a different seat can give you and inch or two... My saddlemsn gave me just the extra room I needed.
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance

the advise of many I& I would agree is to buy a used Honda or Kawaski ride a 750 for a year. Get to know what you like and dislike. Take a beginning rides force to learn the baso=ic's on what to watch out for and wear allot of protective gear. I after all my falls recommend Leather , But synthetic arm holds up well in slides too. But Most of all keep good new rubber on the bike, When driving in traffic dont!! Drive faster or slower, never with. Wear Florcent yellow. Who the fuch cares what you look like as long as your seen. Later on if you choose ride in other colors. I wear a Kilt! Always use the best helmet you will fall! Hopefully your going slow enough. If dear are around like in the spring never go fast. Use the back Break! Know how to get out of a bad situation. Avoid High siding!
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Yes great advice here. Go with a learner bike first. I have been riding for about fifteen years. Owning several bikes 450 750 900 Now a proud owner of a Scout ABS custom. This is not a bike for beginners. I would suggest starting with a Yamaha VStar or Honda Shadow 750 easy to handle and enough power.
Happy shopping and safe riding
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
My advice is to take a Motorcycle Safety Course first. Keep your head on a swivel.
 
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