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So I’m 6’, 235, and had not ridden in 10 years when I bought my scout bobber. Rode some 10 years ago but not enough to build up much experience.

I love the scout- great bike for running around town for me.

As far as a less expensive starter bike that you then upgrade from- purely personal and financial decision. If it gives you heartburn to imagine dropping your scout then perhaps a starter bike is not a bad idea.

Either way- take some riding classes- best money you will spend aside from a good helmet
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Advice ? Sure..
Once you tell me exactly what ALL you intend to do with a bike, I'll tell you the pros and cons of the choices you have.
If you have no idea what you intend to do with a bike, it doesn't matter what you buy..

Now, let me tell you all about me.. And my bikes thru the years... And about my learning of street riding... And how bout a bunch of useless opinions tossed in at no extra charge ?

So, when I was 5, I had a ....................
 

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CDC50925-4F3A-4A65-AB36-A5C59676B50A.jpeg

This was my first bike but I have always kinda been that go big or go home kinda guy. It is your money get what makes you happy. I do recommend taking a riding class prior to venturing out on whatever you buy big or small.
 

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2020 Indian Scout Jade Green and Thunder Black
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If you want light weight, low center of gravity and easy to ride bike the Scout is a great first bike. At 6’2” you would have to satisfy yourself that the extended reach option is comfortable for you first. The caveat is that you start slow (which you should during the break-in period.) and take your time. The conventional wisdom is to get a cheap bike to learn on. I think that is sound advice. In my case I was infatuated with the Scout and had “Scout on the brain” and I really wasn’t interested in riding any other bike. Could you drop it? Sure. But so do experienced riders coming to the Scout. Or a Chief, Challenger, Roadmaster etc. Just get the crash bars and wrap the contact surfaces in case you drop it. (Burn into your brain to keep the front wheel straight before you stop.)

A non scientific poll of Scout riders:


If you are a reasonable person, the Scout can make a great first bike. Take your time to develop your riding confidence and your familiarity with the machine. (Noob tip: Start riding early in the morning on weekends when the roads are practically deserted. Preferably during a pandemic.). You will not outgrow the Scout anytime soon. If you are a “risk taker “ personality, you should probably not be riding motorcycles at all, but if you do, get a smaller bike first so you you may reduce the risk of hurting yourself.
All the best on your new adventure.
Ride safely my friend.
 

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I can’t speak to the ergonomics for you or your ability, but my S60 was my first street bike and I’ve had no issues riding it, I’ve taken multiple safety classes, and I haven’t dropped it yet in almost 4 years of riding now (knock on wood).
 

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After I insisting a smaller bike for a couple of months for learning would be better, if your heart is set at Scout then please know that I was 6' and I was certainly not cramped on the bike. You might need to get mini apes (or Bobber 20).

I had floorboards on mine as well as an aftermarket seat and I was very comfortable. I got a touring bike because my wife started riding with me plus I want to tour long distance.
 

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My last bike was a 2019 Scout ABS. I had the extended reach foot control kit pus the floorboards put on it, also the 10 inch mini apes handlebars. I'm 5 foot eleven and it fit me pretty good.
 

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Not sure what the logistics are on your side of the pond regarding new licence holders and test rides from dealerships? Many over here won’t indulge new licence holders. Some do as long as they accompany you.

Nevertheless ‘proof is in the pudding’ doesn’t matter what people say, you as an individual with personal needs only you can decide. Cock your leg over as many saddles as it may take, go for a demo ride (if possible) and then choose your pony and enjoy it!
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Not all but many bigger size people who buy Scouts find themselves to be uncomfortable riding a Scout on long trips and end up trading them in for a bigger bike like a Dark Horse, Chief Vintage, Chieftain & etc. It all depends on what kind of riding you plan on doing, I am 6'1" and 250 lbs. And even though I would like to have a Scout, The ones I have rode feel uncomfortable for my style of riding, I love my Indian Chief Vintage it is very comfortable and meets my style expectations, So my suggestion is buy an Indian that works for whatever type of riding you plan on doing, Meets your comfort needs, And meets your style expectations. 🐺
 

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That was the problem with that 2019 Scout I had. I spent a lot of money trying to make it comfortable and ultimately the harsh suspension over rough road surfaces was just getting too painful. I tried a Corbin Solo seat to replace the stock torture rack with limited success but it's firmness still worked against it. I wound up getting a Mother Road Customs Scout springer seat which helped immensely with the jolts coming up from the suspension but still caused some crotch irritation from the narrow front part of the tractor seat. I finally gave up after over a year and traded it in on a leftover 2020 Challenger.
 

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I agree with @zee and others - start on an inexpensive smaller easy to handle used bike and then move up. Make that part of your game plan. Don't concern yourself with style and looks with this first bike, your going to upgrade in 3 to 6 months anyway - it's temporary. It's purpose is to facilitate your learning and gaining experience so focus on something easy to ride and learn on that you won't worry about dropping,

because

I also agree with @4 inch pistons when he says "Respect, learning curve, and rider safety is a state of mind and attitude." This is critical advice. Anybody can ride a motorcycle down a straight road with little traffic. It's the daily tricky situations you'll encounter that could/will be a challenge. You have no experience. All of these situations will be new to you. How well you handle them and adapt to them is unknown. Your size has no bearing on how intimidated you'll be and how quickly you'll gain confidence. A larger and shiny new bike may likely be a distraction as you'll be thinking about the bike (its weight or its newness), which will inhibit your learning curve and limit your confidence.

Another thing no one else mentioned that I found extremely valuable is the use of learning resources. Two that I used (still use) in my first 3 months while riding my starter bike were:

1. Jerry Paladino's "Ride Like a Pro" course. I found an abandoned parking lot and set up his course and studied his material and practiced regularly. I found this to be invaluable. One of Jerry's student's said something like "I thought I had 20 years of riding experience, but after taking Jerry's course I realized I had one year of experience which I was repeating 20 times."

2. The other resource is "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough, 2nd edition. Whereas Paladino's course focuses heavily on handling a bike confidently, Hough's book expertly addresses the many real world hazards that exist and provides clear guidance on how to handle them.

My advice is to get a lightweight used bike along with these resources and devote your first 3 months to developing your skills, knowledge, and experience. Then upgrade to your dream bike and ride confidently and safely toward the horizon.
 

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I agree with @zee and others - start on an inexpensive smaller easy to handle used bike and then move up. Make that part of your game plan. Don't concern yourself with style and looks with this first bike, your going to upgrade in 3 to 6 months anyway - it's temporary. It's purpose is to facilitate your learning and gaining experience so focus on something easy to ride and learn on that you won't worry about dropping,

because

I also agree with @4 inch pistons when he says "Respect, learning curve, and rider safety is a state of mind and attitude." This is critical advice. Anybody can ride a motorcycle down a straight road with little traffic. It's the daily tricky situations you'll encounter that could/will be a challenge. You have no experience. All of these situations will be new to you. How well you handle them and adapt to them is unknown. Your size has no bearing on how intimidated you'll be and how quickly you'll gain confidence. A larger and shiny new bike may likely be a distraction as you'll be thinking about the bike (its weight or its newness), which will inhibit your learning curve and limit your confidence.

Another thing no one else mentioned that I found extremely valuable is the use of learning resources. Two that I used (still use) in my first 3 months while riding my starter bike were:

1. Jerry Paladino's "Ride Like a Pro" course. I found an abandoned parking lot and set up his course and studied his material and practiced regularly. I found this to be invaluable. One of Jerry's student's said something like "I thought I had 20 years of riding experience, but after taking Jerry's course I realized I had one year of experience which I was repeating 20 times."

2. The other resource is "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough, 2nd edition. Whereas Paladino's course focuses heavily on handling a bike confidently, Hough's book expertly addresses the many real world hazards that exist and provides clear guidance on how to handle them.

My advice is to get a lightweight used bike along with these resources and devote your first 3 months to developing your skills, knowledge, and experience. Then upgrade to your dream bike and ride confidently and safely toward the horizon.

Fully agree on the "ride like a pro" class - I did one of those last year in South Carolina and learned quite a bit. An additional resource I have picked up quite a bit from is DanDan the Fireman on Youtube. He puts up a ton of content - after accident reviews, live reviews, etc. Some of his basic tips on things you see that should raise your alert are sound advice.
 

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So I’m 6’, 235, and had not ridden in 10 years when I bought my scout bobber. Rode some 10 years ago but not enough to build up much experience.

I love the scout- great bike for running around town for me.

As far as a less expensive starter bike that you then upgrade from- purely personal and financial decision. If it gives you heartburn to imagine dropping your scout then perhaps a starter bike is not a bad idea.

Either way- take some riding classes- best money you will spend aside from a good helmet
If you already have the motorcycle endorsement on your license,, go to your local motorcycle dealer and rent a motorcycle for a day... a scout, a dark horse, a chief. Then you can make a good Decision on witch one. I’d go scout, then dark horse. My choice would be a softail low rider S. Fits the 6’-2” 235 thing better. Also ,,, be carefully and wear a helmet. Have fun.
 

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Do not get a bigger model as a new rider.

Bobber is a perfect first bike. However, I would highly recommend getting a cheap / used bike to learn. Many people drop their first bikes. No shame in that, I dropped mine twice. But it wasn't the Indian so it didn't hurt as much.

Cheap used bikes can also be sold quickly for the money you paid for (I made a profit on mine).

That said, Scout Bobber is a great first bike if you're gentle with the throttle. It has more than enough power to get you in trouble, so you'd have to be gentle at first. But the weight is very manageable and the centre of gravity is low.
I can't agree more strongly. I had a good friend (long time rider) mentor me in the beginning. He gave me similar advice, which (to my benefit) served me well as I followed it. He also insisted I attend a rider safety course before purchasing my first bike. I have never regretted following his advice :cool:
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
First Bike, new rider the scout 60 is a good choice. Get riding down Pat before you consider a larger bike!!
Good Luck. Stay safe pay attention stay focused
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
So I’m 6’, 235, and had not ridden in 10 years when I bought my scout bobber. Rode some 10 years ago but not enough to build up much experience.

I love the scout- great bike for running around town for me.

As far as a less expensive starter bike that you then upgrade from- purely personal and financial decision. If it gives you heartburn to imagine dropping your scout then perhaps a starter bike is not a bad idea.

Either way- take some riding classes- best money you will spend aside from a good helmet
A scout is not good for a taller person. My son has a Bobber and u have riden it... not for long legs. I have a 2019 Springfield and had a 2016 Chief. If your buying new and don't take long trips I suggest the NEW Chief. Ut doesn't have bags but has the same frame as the Springfield and costs almost the same as a Bobber
Here us a pic of my Springfield
632329
 

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2016 blue diamond roadmaster, 2017 chieftain limited, 2017 chieftain classic dark horse.
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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I would for sure take a test ride on the Bobber and the regular Scout. Mainly the handlebars are so different you may totally prefer one over the other. Both bikes have more than enough power for you and with their forward controls you would like either. You also can get an extended reach seat as well.
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Whatever you choose take a good quality motorcycle safety course! I promise it’ll serve you well for the rest of your life..
 

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Ditto above: take the class, and start with a small, light bike. You may even find that gargantuan 900+ lb. bikes are not even your thing. Personally, I've reached the stage of life where I'm not interested in anything over 500 pounds; but that's just me.
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
I agree with others. I’m 6’6” started on a
I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
i’m 6’6” started on 650 Honda Shadow. No ride a 2015 Indian Vintage.
go easy! You will SMILE, SMILE, SMILE
 
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