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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
 

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I am looking to purchase a Indian motorcycle in the next week. I am a new rider with no experience. I want something lightweight and easy to ride. I had narrowed it down to the Indian Scout Bobber, but a friend of mine told me that I may need to consider a bigger model because of my size(6’2” and 240 lbs). I am just looking for some advice from some experienced riders before I make my purchase. Thanks in advance
Do not get a bigger model as a new rider.

Bobber is a perfect first bike. However, I would highly recommend getting a cheap / used bike to learn. Many people drop their first bikes. No shame in that, I dropped mine twice. But it wasn't the Indian so it didn't hurt as much.

Cheap used bikes can also be sold quickly for the money you paid for (I made a profit on mine).

That said, Scout Bobber is a great first bike if you're gentle with the throttle. It has more than enough power to get you in trouble, so you'd have to be gentle at first. But the weight is very manageable and the centre of gravity is low.
 

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Similar to @zee advise I drove Yamaha vStar 250, now I am planning to hop on Indian, but again I am 5.4' hence vStar 250 is not for you. You need a little bigger bike but a old one.
 

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Also you may find that motorcycle riding isn't for you. If you are invested in a used motorcycle the financial hit won't be as big if you decide to sell it.
That worked out well for me.

The first bike I got was from a guy who bought that as his first bike and didnt' ride it. I got a great deal.

The second bike (Scout Bobber) was from a guy who bought it 18 months ago and rode it 155km (< 100 miles). I said he bought it on a spur of a moment, was rich enough to be able to make that his impulse purchase and then never rode.

The third I bought new, but I made a profit on the first two bikes.
 

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The new Chief series look a bit leaned down and lighter than the older ones. Might be a little less scrunched for a bigger guy
 

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No one new to motorcycling should buy a 111 (or more) ci, 750lbs+ bike for learning.
I don't even recommend the Scout. Do yourself a favor and get a learner and ride the hell out of it. It's easy to ride fast, so practicing slow speed maneuvers are where it's at. Next year model Indians will be even better and you'll be ready.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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my thoughts below are different i say get what you want what you are comfortable on and learn to ride it below is pic of my first bike built it loved it and still own it.
if you get a bike that you are not comfortable on how can you enjoy it? i am by no means nocking a scout, they are great bikes but being 6'2" 240 i see you having elbows hitting knees. look for a bike you can sit on and not feel cramped up on. Be able to plant your feet on the ground get one that has front and rear crash bars find you an empty parking lot and ride slow get the feel of the bike.
 

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I am with everyone that is advising getting a good used bike for starters. I've been riding 51 years and still to this day, I have trouble with some bikes, but I have enough experience to know what I can and cannot handle. There's a ton of good used bikes out there that would be great to learn on. Yamaha V-Stars and Kawasaki Nomads have almost full size bikes with midrange v-twin engines that would be great beginner for a person your size.
 

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Buy a used Vulcan 900. The forward controls will fit you really well. They’re wonderful bikes to ride and learn on. The lt comes with bags and a windshield. The custom has the big front wheel and cool looks. I think from a cruiser perspective you won’t find a better starter bike. Hell I still ride them and have a blast every time.
 

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Well in my honest opinion... find a used Victory they are light weight and easy to handle... something like a used Vegas or Kingpin... learn to ride... get comfortable.. and when you are ready to jump over to Indian it counts as a legacy bike and you'll get an extra 500 off of the Indian... and you can find used Victory's for under 5 grand with low miles... my Vegas (I still have) has about 80K on the clock and nothing but 1 starter for maintenance other than wear items
 

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For a woman a first bike must not exceed 400lbs, for a man of your size a bike under 600lbs is a good match but there is more then just the weight, horse power and torque is what you need to be careful about, some 750cc engine produce almost 150hp and some 1100cc have around 60hp, You need a smooth and reliable ride like a Honda Shadow 750-1100cc, or Yamaha V-Star 1100cc, both are pretty easy cruiser bike to ride and pretty cheap to get. We can name lot of candidate in the naked bike class or in the adventure class but you need to sit on them first and pic the one who fit like a glove. If you can take a motorcycle technical class go for it! You learn the first most important thing counter steering and few trick like let your fingers rest over your brake and clutch lever....It's a good investment for sure.

If you decide to buy the Scout bobber because you can't live without it! Buy the extended reach foot controls , you thank later...
Extended Reach Foot Controls, Pair | Indian Motorcycle

Since it's your first bike be prepare to smile like you never did before but don't worry! That's one of the side effect riding a motorcycle do to a human been.
 

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I started with a Honda Vt750. $4k and several thousand miles. Sold it for $4K. I am close to your size. Once I mastered in 3-4 months, I bought my scout (1500 miles) and 8 months later, my Chief (Now 6000 miles). Don’t rush out an buy immediately. Learn on a cheap bike.
 

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Any of the big 4 Japanese brands made smaller cruiser style motorcycles. Honda Shadows, Yamaha V-Stars, Suzuki Boulevards and Kawasaki Vulcans all came in beginner sizes from 500cc to 900cc.
 

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Do not get a bigger model as a new rider.
On this point, I only sort of agree. If you a big guy, handling a bigger bike may not be an issue. However, I would buy used as a first bike.

Bobber is a perfect first bike. However, I would highly recommend getting a cheap / used bike to learn. Many people drop their first bikes. No shame in that, I dropped mine twice. But it wasn't the Indian so it didn't hurt as much.
We all drop them. Damned near dropped my RM in the drive yesterday. Backed out, made a few adjustments and about 1/10 of a second before letting it lean onto the kickstand, I had a fleeting thought and looked down. Oops. Kickstand wasn't down. I must have missed with my boot. It happens.

Cheap used bikes can also be sold quickly for the money you paid for (I made a profit on mine).
That said, Scout Bobber is a great first bike if you're gentle with the throttle. It has more than enough power to get you in trouble, so you'd have to be gentle at first. But the weight is very manageable and the centre of gravity is low.
My wife bought a Suzuki Boulevard for her first bike. It was a little too big, but she adapted. It was traded six months later for a HD. She did trade at a loss, but she needed a stepping stone. Now, she also has a Chieftain.
 

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I bought a used and well farkled VStrom 650 for my 1st bike. Rode it for a season, 15k miles including a cross canada trip. Paid $6.5k, dropped it once and sold it for $4k. Some new tires ( for the long ride ) and a couple of oil changes were all I spent on it. More than fast enough for a guy who had not ridden on the street for 25 years.
 

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Let me be the FIRST person here to say that I disagree with almost every post here. Respect, learning curve, and rider safety is a state of mind and attitude. You can be just a safe on a powerful heavy bikes as you can an underpowered light top heavy anything. People die every day on lightweight 250cc bikes and smaller---heck people die on mopeds because of playing the fool or just not understanding how to be safe on a motorcycle. That is not the fault of the motorcycle.. NOT SAYING THE BIKES MENTIONED HERE ARE ALL OF THAT. I personally find smaller, lighter metric bikes are harder to ride. JMHO of course. The 2 best balanced and easiest to ride motorcycles I have owned is a Honda F6B and Victory Cross Roads. When I went from the smaller Hondas to my first Harleys, I was amazed at the ease a well balanced and solid cruiser handled---much better than the "learner" bikes. Now understand we are talking 4 decades ago. I have dropped a bike twice since 1978 and once was trying to get off in a hurry and forgot the kickstand. The other was trying to get off the road before getting rear ended, and after getting on the gravel locking the brakes to keep from going head on into a ditch. Before getting flamed by everyone on the4 thread, let me repeat----How quickly do you learn. I learned how to ride on a cold rainy night in February 1977 after paying cash for my new Honda XL125 and knew nobody to get it home for me. To add to the fact of how stupid I was, I rode it home with no eye protection wearing a yellow wind breaker in a 45 degree mist in the dark. I am not suggesting you do any of that---only that within 3 weeks I knew the 125 was not the bike for me and I had made a mistake.


Here is my suggestion: After taking the motorcycle course, determine where you stand as far as ability. Did you learn and become proficient quickly? Be honest with yourself! If not then maybe a cheap dirt bike will teach you what you need to know. OR----if you choose to spend thousands on something you don't really want as a "just in case", then that is fine, too. I find my Scout Bobber as a very easy to ride machine---very solid, but light and nimble.

In answer to the original post---I am 6'1" , 32" inseam and 240 lbs and NO, the Bobber is NOT to small, but in my case I had to get a custom Corbin seat, different bars, and 80mm foot control extenders to make the bike fit me. The stock configuration will be very cramped for you. A standard Scout is more adaptable, but does not have near the "Cool Factor" as the Bobber.:LOL:(y) 20210131_162107.jpg
 

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I'm with 4 Inch Pistons. I started on a scout, and not the 60. After a year I went to a Chief DH (now vintage). But you want to know what I ride now... a scout. I'm going to say buy what you want and can afford. The scout has a lot of power but it's very controllable power, especially if you have self control. The throttle is progressive and not overly twitchy. I went to the chief dh because I thought a bigger bike would fit me better and it was more comfortable, but I found it boring and riding a lazy boy down the road wasn't for me. I think a big part of it for me was the engine. The air cooled engine feels like driving a pickup to me, the scouts water cooled engine is more sports car. :)

But anyway, if you think you can be an adult and keep yourself under control instead doing stupid S*** then go for the scout. Go easy on the throttle and it'll go easy on you. Then after a few months or a year when your skill level is there the power will be waiting for you. No dealing with selling the old bike and buying a new one. Indian has some options for taller riders if you need them and so does the aftermarket. The new Chiefs are worth looking at too, but I'm a scout guy for the engine :) . The scout 60 has plenty of oomph for most people too so it's worth considering as well.
 
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