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Texas Hill Country
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Discussion Starter #1
It is like a crack head chasing the dragon.
They never seem to hit the high that they did the first time.

Riding a motorcycle for my whole life has been sort of like that.
I can count the times on both hands where the conditions were perfect.
The weather, the traffic, the handlebars, the seat....it all just comes together.
If you have ever hit this groove.....ya know.
You literally run out of road before you run out of "want to".

My last trip to the Texas Hill Country was like that.
The weather was a cool 50 degrees.
The sky was cloudy so I didn't even have to squint when riding into the sun.
My leathers were doing their job and my Indian was whispering to me.

You can't have a day like this when it is 100 degrees outside with 95 percent humidity.
Riding around the block is a struggle.
In those conditions you ride because you have to get to where you are going.

I took off from New Orleans and didn't stop until I was 160 miles out.
Then I didn't even take off my helmet....gas and go.
That is something that I very rarely do anymore.
My old hips get stiff and I welcome the opportunity to walk around and stretch at fuel stops.

My next stop was the Texas state line and then I did another gas and go.

I didn't take off my helmet until I hit Brookshire Texas which is on the west side of Houston.
About 400 miles out.
I ran my average speed based on time and distance and I was averaging 77 mph.
That my friends is flying low to the ground for a 400 mile average!
I negotiated I-10 through Houston like I was on rails.

Nope not even a little tired at that point so I rolled on.
No stiffness in my joints at all.
Stock seat, sheep skin pelt and a backrest along with highway pegs out on the crashbar.

I was in the groove and more importantly, I was now on those fine Texas highways with a 75mph speed limit.
My next fuel stop was at Buckee's in Luling ....I had to take off my helmet for this one.
If you have ever been there then you know what I'm talking about.
They have the best baked goods you never did eat.

I knew that just up ahead I was going to take Texas highway 46 to miss San Antonio.
Before I knew it, I was there.
The rolling hills and beautiful wide open skies.

One of the best and most spiritual rides of my life.
Now, before ya tell me that "every ride is like that".....yeah, I know.
I've never been guilty of taking this great joy that we share for granted.

But if you have EVER hit "The Groove"....you know.

For now?
I'll keep chasing that dragon.
I know it's still in me.
 

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I kept you covered with my super soaker water pistol and my mash potato spud gun all the way to Brookshire. Least I could do for someone travelling through my turf.
 

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Texas Hill Country
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4,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I kept you covered with my super soaker water pistol and my mash potato spud gun all the way to Brookshire. Least I could do for someone travelling through my turf.
I sensed that ya had my back.
 

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Premium Member
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2,836 Posts
It is like a crack head chasing the dragon.
They never seem to hit the high that they did the first time.

Riding a motorcycle for my whole life has been sort of like that.
I can count the times on both hands where the conditions were perfect.
The weather, the traffic, the handlebars, the seat....it all just comes together.
If you have ever hit this groove.....ya know.
You literally run out of road before you run out of "want to".

My last trip to the Texas Hill Country was like that.
The weather was a cool 50 degrees.
The sky was cloudy so I didn't even have to squint when riding into the sun.
My leathers were doing their job and my Indian was whispering to me.

You can't have a day like this when it is 100 degrees outside with 95 percent humidity.
Riding around the block is a struggle.
In those conditions you ride because you have to get to where you are going.

I took off from New Orleans and didn't stop until I was 160 miles out.
Then I didn't even take off my helmet....gas and go.
That is something that I very rarely do anymore.
My old hips get stiff and I welcome the opportunity to walk around and stretch at fuel stops.

My next stop was the Texas state line and then I did another gas and go.

I didn't take off my helmet until I hit Brookshire Texas which is on the west side of Houston.
About 400 miles out.
I ran my average speed based on time and distance and I was averaging 77 mph.
That my friends is flying low to the ground for a 400 mile average!
I negotiated I-10 through Houston like I was on rails.

Nope not even a little tired at that point so I rolled on.
No stiffness in my joints at all.
Stock seat, sheep skin pelt and a backrest along with highway pegs out on the crashbar.

I was in the groove and more importantly, I was now on those fine Texas highways with a 75mph speed limit.
My next fuel stop was at Buckee's in Luling ....I had to take off my helmet for this one.
If you have ever been there then you know what I'm talking about.
They have the best baked goods you never did eat.

I knew that just up ahead I was going to take Texas highway 46 to miss San Antonio.
Before I knew it, I was there.
The rolling hills and beautiful wide open skies.

One of the best and most spiritual rides of my life.
Now, before ya tell me that "every ride is like that".....yeah, I know.
I've never been guilty of taking this great joy that we share for granted.

But if you have EVER hit "The Groove"....you know.

For now?
I'll keep chasing that dragon.
I know it's still in me.
That is awesome BD, I haven't experienced that, hope one day I will. :D
 

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BD, I've had a few of those. As the years go by they don't happen all that often anymore, the body is usually complaining before sitting in the saddle. But on that rare occasion...........everything is right in the universe.
 

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"You do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle!" - Dan Aykroyd.

 

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image.jpg


Yeah, and I've had a couple of trips to The Groove before I even mount up..... people wandering over to tell me how good She looks!
 

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Texas Hill Country
Joined
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4,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
800mg of Ibuprofen helps too.

The miles just melt away almost unnoticed.

As you pass a billboard you notice something that looks good and you tell yourself that you can make it just 30 more miles before you stop. So you do a little on board computing. You check the mileage since the last fuel stop. Then you look down to see that your cruising at 82mph. The posted speed limit is 75mph so you figure your ok here. Nail down the cruise control and look to see just what the mill is spooling. How many RPM's? You need to know because you have identified a sweet spot. Your motor put you here, not the speedometer or the tachometer. Your Indian whispered that this was a happy place. How is your fuel mileage running on the trip computer? It shows that you are now shoveling coal at an alarming rate. At 82mph she is thirsty. A mile eating maniac washing it down with high test.

At that point you begin to look for your exit or at least another billboard....worst case scenario, a mile marker. The stop you wanted to make was 30 miles....behind you....and you got to pee.
 

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Texas Hill Country
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4,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Big Daddy was the rollers name....


We're gonna be on time or we're leaving the rails.
 

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Texas Hill Country
Joined
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4,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
My head fills with all the iron pushing men I've known or known about.
All the trips and all the miles over all the years.

Hold your head high boys.
Make your Indian proud.
 

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Texas Hill Country
Joined
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4,697 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Whew...

The stuff legends are made of.

Have you ever stopped to think about all of the people who come over and talk to you?
Admire your Indian?
Has the thought ever passed through your mind that they are talking to an American legend?
Because like it or not, realize it or not....future generations will look back on us with the same reverence we feel about the railroad men of days gone by....All of your family, all of your friends....and then I read remarks like, I'm not a biker, I just ride.
Yeah right....ask anyone who knows you. Are you a biker? You will be amazed at what you hear from them.

I know you may be uncomfortable with this....embrace it.

Hands on the throttle, engines moaning, listen to the jingle, the rumble, the roar. Gliding through the woodlands.....Dude, that could be written about us.
 

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I'd love to make that ride someday, especially if I could bypass San Antonio! Used to stop in Luling on the way to San Diego, load up on ribs and brisket at the old Central Market for the long haul ahead. I can only imagine what Kerrville, Mt. Home, et al. could be on my Classic!
 

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731 Posts
When I was a child and the clan would gather the old timers would play these tunes. My grandfathers, father and uncles are all gone now. Only my brother and I left to play these tunes. Few young men in the family play instruments at all they seem to prefer video games. The few that do play favor new genres of music. Thanks for the post BD they brought back good memories.
 

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Early joiner
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157 Posts
Some of my best riding "grooves" have been on rural two lane hiways in western KS and NE where the road parallels the train rails and you can run beside the locomotive for miles. I do miss the Steamers that were still around when I was a kid!
 
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