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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been spending a lot of time trying to reduce the PITA angles for reaching the front and back tire valves. I like to check my tire pressure at least weekly to keep my OCD well sharpened. And no, I don't do the 46psi front, but that's another 10 threads. Here's where I'm at so far:

Front tire: position the bike so that the valve is forward and near parallel with the ground. If you're looking at the tire from the right-side (as seated on the bike), the valve would be positioned near 3 o'clock. This provides me the most comfortable and clear access. I can sit on a small roll stool or use a thick garden knee pad, and use a quick release extension to attach or detach from the valve quickly without losing much air pressure. I attach the male fitting of the quick release extension to my female fitting mini portable air pump using teflon tape.

Back tire: definitely a thick garden knee pad exercise. If you're looking at the tire from the right-side, the back tire valve is positioned at approximately 7 o'clock. Once again, the quick release extension is key to accomplish this task quickly.

Thick garden knee pad: https://www.amazon.com/Thick-Kneeli...&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=garden+knee+pads&psc=1

Small roll stool: Pneumatic Roller Seat

Quick release air pump extension: 10 Inch Mini-Air Compressor Air Hose Extension with Quick Release

Mini 12 volt air pump: https://www.amazon.com/P-I-Auto-Sto...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=M3JRH0DTDTEDCF2TQAD4

Note to self: purchase Stop n Go tire plugger emergency kit (just in case).

It's a work-in-progress.
 

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The Springfield has Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) included. TPMS gives a good way to check tire pressure, even every day or hour.
But if you don't have TPMS, perhaps like me because I changed the wheels for spoke wheels, you can use external TPMS system like this one I'm using: FOBO Bike (FOBO Bike - FOBO). You will see the pressure and warning on your phone with Bluetooth link.

Of course, if you have to adjust the pressure, you will have to use all the gear you have described ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Springfield has Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) included. TPMS gives a good way to check tire pressure, even every day or hour.
But if you don't have TPMS, perhaps like me because I changed the wheels for spoke wheels, you can use external TPMS system like this one I'm using: FOBO Bike (FOBO Bike - FOBO). You will see the pressure and warning on your phone with Bluetooth link.

Of course, if you have to adjust the pressure, you will have to use all the gear you have described ;)
I would prefer to use TPMS, but it doesn't work (apply) while the tire is cold and/or not in motion - correct?

From the manual: "Although a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) will alert the user to a low pressure condition (if equipped), always inspect tire pressure and condition before each ride." This is how I use TPMS: for when in motion and monitoring pressure, or as an early warning to me should I happen to lose tire air pressure.
 

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The dealership where I bought my bike sold me an annual plan to check the pressure each night for me. They supposedly send a guy out in a van and will fill my tires with air when needed. Are you saying I got conned? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The dealership where I bought my bike sold me an annual plan to check the pressure each night for me. They supposedly send a guy out in a van and will fill my tires with air when needed. Are you saying I got conned? ;)
Let me know where you live so I can also go check on your bike one night....and leave the PIN taped to the seat if you would, please. I need a backup just in case my tire pressure gets too low and it's a PITA to fill up.
 

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The dealership where I bought my bike sold me an annual plan to check the pressure each night for me. They supposedly send a guy out in a van and will fill my tires with air when needed. Are you saying I got conned? ;)
I have that same plan but read paragraph 9 on page 2. Air is added for $1.98 a pound after 3 PM
Before 3 PM its $1.29............on weekdays
 

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Just use this simple air in tire formula and you will know the air pressure before you even leave the house.

Text Font Line Brand


This formula will also check your oil, wash your bike and chase Harley riders out of your neighborhood before you ride.
 

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I have to put air in every other week, to top it off, is that normal?

Just an FYI, it is illegal for service stations to charge for air and water, (at least here in CA) they can ask, but must turn it on when requested. I see people pay, and stop them all the time, tell them just tell the attendant to turn t on, it's illegal for them not to.
 

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I want to keep the warranty on my 2015 Chieftain in good standing with Indian Motorcycle, so I take my bike back monthly to the Dealer and get approved Factory Air put into the tires, thus keeping my warranty and getting a smooth ride too !



>---------> >---------> >--------->

Live Free - Ride Hard - Die Well
 

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Ah! I missed that in the warranty requirements. I'll definitely see my dealer tomorrow.
I want to keep the warranty on my 2015 Chieftain in good standing with Indian Motorcycle, so I take my bike back monthly to the Dealer and get approved Factory Air put into the tires, thus keeping my warranty and getting a smooth ride too !



>---------> >---------> >--------->

Live Free - Ride Hard - Die Well
 

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You have addressed a unique problem, Jeff. Thanks for the advice.

With my hands (size of ham hocks), it is a real pain to check the air on cold tires. I found using a valve stem extension the perfect solution. They cost about $5. Simply screw them on (takes seconds) and you can take them off after checking the air pressure and adding air if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You have addressed a unique problem, Jeff. Thanks for the advice.

With my hands (size of ham hocks), it is a real pain to check the air on cold tires. I found using a valve stem extension the perfect solution. They cost about $5. Simply screw them on (takes seconds) and you can take them off after checking the air pressure and adding air if needed.
Lute, any chance you can respond with a link to the stem extensions you prefer? Cheers.
 

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Here are the ones that I use to check and add air to the tires on my 2015 Chieftain. Google Search is a powerful tool to finding anything, just takes a little effort !



>---------> >---------> >--------->

Live Free - Ride Hard - Die Well
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here are the ones that I use to check and add air to the tires on my 2015 Chieftain. Google Search is a powerful tool to finding anything, just takes a little effort !



>---------> >---------> >--------->

Live Free - Ride Hard - Die Well
Yes, I've seen this while searching, I just didn't know what to make of either 1) leaving them on the bike to make it easier (would that even work?) or 2) removing them. But absolutely, I've seen these while researching the quickest way to connect and disconnect from the air valve stem.
 

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I'd be careful of leaving them on the bike as they could strike the calipers or other causing damage. If you do choose to leave them on rotate the tire and make sure they don't touch anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'd be careful of leaving them on the bike as they could strike the calipers or other causing damage. If you do choose to leave them on rotate the tire and make sure they don't touch anything.
I just had a "playing card in the spokes with a clothespin" sound in my head thinking of this. Thanks for the memory.
 

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I ordered a quick adapter. I don't know if there is enough space under the side cover, but if there is, I will stow it there, attached to the rear shock so I don't have to remove the cover every time I want to air the shock up. If I need air in my tires I can remove and use it for them.
 

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You might consider putting Nitrogen in your tires. I've found that the tires only need about 2 psi added every year after I started using nitrogen in my motorcycle tires. Added benefit is that they won't heat up as much in the summer riding months and thus you may squeeze a few more miles out of the tires.
 
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