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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we leave for a 4000+ mile road trip to Sturgis. I am changing my oil this weekend, and the bike is only 2 months old and has 4800 miles on it, so tires are good.

Besides the base tool kit that comes with the bike, I want to take a few key tools-

Here is what I am thinking I need- let me know what I am missing.

4mm Allen
6mm Allen
Rachet with sockets- (sizes needed?) extension
Screwdrivers (flat and Phillips)
Star drivers (T-20, T25, ?)
bungee cords
Any nuts/bolts I should carry?

Thoughts?
 

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You should consider what type of repairs you would be able to do first, and what is likely to happen, then choose tools based on that. Personally, I take a tire repair kit, mini electric air compressor, tire levers, and the wrenches to take off the front or rear wheel, as a flat is probably going to be the most common problem. Also spare fuses and a spare clutch cable, and you should be set. Anything more of a problem than that you would be calling a tow truck anyway, so throwing random tools in a bag is not really going to solve the problem.
 

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road triangle reflector to warn drivers that you're on the side of the road at night.
digital or physical repair manual
JB Weld if you're riding sketchy roads where you may break something important
 

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I think you got the basics covered Ensign; and I agree with the guys above.
Doing long rides, here are a few of mine...
Tire plugs,, mini compressor,, cable kit,, red/green bandana.
I’ve never used the compressor on my bike, but have assisted many riders along the road who need air. Works great.
The emer cable kit was $10... cheap insurance.
Bandanas? If my bike is along the road with a problem, the red flag is hanging in sight; maybe I’m not there... walking to the next exit,, or laying nearby doubled-over with kidney stone pain, whatever. Red flag means need help. Green flag means I’M OK ...taking a piss, a nap in the shade, walked to a scenic overlook for pics. Simple, and takes 15sec to pull & hang the green flag, thereby saving good-hearted others from stopping their ride to see if I’m ok.
Not an “emer” thing, but that gas tank filler piece of yellow rubber might be the best $20 spent... filling the Challenger tank always resulted in little splashes on the tank trying to fill but not overfill. Not any more. Put gizmo over the tank, insert nozzle & open pump full flow until it stops. Remove without a drop on tank, and filled perfect to bottom of tank neck. Sounds trivial I know, but every time I use it I smile.

Unseen roadtrip items...
A good map app with the full route downloaded (cached) to device {you can do this with Google Maps & others} -very handy cuz in remote areas without cell signal to load new maps, the gps part of phone still works from satellite signal... with preloaded maps, boom, you still have navigation despite no cell signal.

KNOW where all the bike dealers & shops are along your route.
KNOW what roadside/towing services are avail if needed.
911 SpeedDial setup... ya’ll might roll your eyes on this but hear me out. Years ago riding x-country solo, on a sport/tour bike my fullface helmet had a BT intercom (like many of you might have.) That Cardo device paired to my phone had a 1-button speeddial feature ...I had it set to call 911.
On a long stretch across Wyoming, dusk, trying to make time,, I moved left to pass an SUV. At that moment a beer bottle flew out the window towards me, hit my mirror. I accelerated fast to get by... that car full of punks maybe didn’t like my American flag, or whatever but they decided to play “fck the biker,” speeding up on my ass. That’s no place to play bike vs cager at 100+ mph. I had the speed advantage,, and one more thing: I reached up & pressed that one button on the Cardo for 3sec, and my phone (in pocket) called 911. Both hands on bars & focused on staying ahead of the still speeding idiots blasting their horn, I told the 911 officer exactly where I was & what was happening. It was getting darker, when deer & other critters come out ...not cool.
A few exits later >>> State trooper #1 rolls up behind us. Sweet sight those lights!
I pulled over ahead of the SUV. A minute later another trooper arrived from the opposite direction and came directly to me asking if I was ok. Damn straight. Thank you troopers.
Long-winded I know, sorry,,, but I’m a big believer in quick 911 access via bike just in case. And btw... even if your phone is bar mounted just for maps/messages/music streamed to fairing speakers (no helmet intercom) like I ride now... touching 911 speeddial will connect you & they will stay online tracking you despite unable to talk.

Final tool for bike roadtrips (and always)...
Stay armed.

Enjoy your RIDE Ensign


 

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How do you like that McCuff thing?
 

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How do you like that McCuff thing?
A lot. As noted in my post:

“...that gas tank filler piece of yellow rubber might be the best $20 spent... filling the Challenger tank always resulted in little splashes on the tank trying to fill but not overfill. Not any more. Put gizmo over the tank, insert nozzle & open pump full flow until it stops. Remove without a drop on tank, and filled perfect to bottom of tank neck. Sounds trivial I know, but every time I use it I smile.”
 

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I would take a full set of metric allens, the l shaped ones, electrical tape, medium zip ties, and a Leatherman for an all around tool along with the things you have already mentioned. And an extra CR2032 battery just in case your FOB takes a dump. And a tire gauge.

And don't forget a good rain suit. You will get rained on at some point.

And know your pin and how to start the bike with it...

I also took a small set of bungees and a back packer tarp just in case I needed to shelter on the side of the road in a heavy rain storm. And a simple first aid kit.

I took all hat stuff and many of the things already mentioned, but never needed any of it on 4,403 mile trip over 9 days. However it was good for piece of mind.

Here is a shot of mine loaded down. That front compartment is a tool kit built into the biltwell bag...

599565
 

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I'd throw in an adjustable wrench, in addition to some of the other items mentioned. I actually just bought a Cruz Tools set for my bikes.
 

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A lot. As noted in my post:

“...that gas tank filler piece of yellow rubber might be the best $20 spent... filling the Challenger tank always resulted in little splashes on the tank trying to fill but not overfill. Not any more. Put gizmo over the tank, insert nozzle & open pump full flow until it stops. Remove without a drop on tank, and filled perfect to bottom of tank neck. Sounds trivial I know, but every time I use it I smile.”
My bad, I skipped over that whole part...
 
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my tool kit... Crescent wrench, pliers, complete set of metric allen, duct tape, electrical wire tape, wire, tire plugs, 12V compressor, first aid kit... that's it.. it has served me well and have not needed it very much but like others have said piece of mind... I like the bandana thing never heard of it before... so I really don't know how good it would be.. but if everyone did it would be great
 

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Lots of great suggestions here, but think it over real good or you'll be packing everything AND the kitchen sink with you.

I might have missed it, but what kind of motorbike do you have? Wheels? If you have white wall tires and spoke rims there's no need for a tire repair kit. Just have a good road service policy. I have Good Sam and have used them several times with great success. Much better than AAA IMHO only.

Can't go wrong to add:

a roll of duct tape
assorted lengths of bungee cords
rok straps
an assortment of zip ties
packing tape (great for quick fixes to headlight, windshields, etc)

I'll add more when I think of them.

Also, what's your route to Sturgis? Where from and such. Same route there and back? First time there?

Have a good ride!
 

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Crescent wrenches=nut rounders. Never use a crescent wrench on a torque-specific fastener.
well it's managing space and using the most of it... I don't like using a fire wrench either but sometimes a mans gotta do what a mans gotta do
 

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“...that gas tank filler piece of yellow rubber might be the best $20 spent... filling the Challenger tank always resulted in little splashes on the tank trying to fill but not overfill. Not any more. Put gizmo over the tank, insert nozzle & open pump full flow until it stops. Remove without a drop on tank, and filled perfect to bottom of tank neck. Sounds trivial I know, but every time I use it I smile.”
My curiosity got the best of me so I ended up getting one of these as well. I love it! It seems trivial but being able to easily and quickly fill to a full tank with no overspray is awesome! I store it in my left fairing pocket with my side stand plate and it seems to work well there.
 
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Crescent wrenches=nut rounders. Never use a crescent wrench on a torque-specific fastener.
I don't use a crescent wrench on fasteners when I have the correct tool at hand. But, in a pinch on the road they can be quite helpful. Something like a loose mirror can be easily tightened up with an adjustable wrench. They're useful, even if not the best choice.
 
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