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Discussion Starter #1
Headed out to pick up my Vintage finally. Will be using a uhaul trailer to bring it home. Wondering about what there is on the back of the bike to attach ratchet strap. Figure the front I'll use the hiway bar but unsure of the back. Any one with a classic/vintage have suggestions. Thanks.
 

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I know a lot about a little.
I know a little about a lot.
But I'm afraid I know very little about hauling a motorcycle on a trailer.

From years of reading motorcycle forums, like OJ was heard to say.....I'll take a stab at it.

The primary device is a front wheel chock.
But with a U-Haul trailer, you are not likely to have that luxury.
I would watch the front fender tip. The looks of the lay of the land is that the fender would hit the trailer wall before the wal contacts the front tire....danger.

The second thing to watch is that your front straps do not compress the front suspension to the point of bottoming it out.
Ratchet straps to each handlebar might be a better choice than the crash bar.

My eye falls to the rear passenger foot peg mounts.
They look like they would take a strap nicely.
You don't need a whole lot of torque on these straps as they would serve to keep the tail of the bike from going sideways only.

Hope this helps some.
If nothing else, maybe this lame advice will prompt someone who really knows to pipe up.
 

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I've been hauling bikes on trailers for decades, so I have a "little" experience with the situation. BD is right, you need to make sure you chock the front wheel, but a Uhaul trailer is probably the least friendly unit for hauling a bike. That is because you cannot mount a wheel chock or tie down's to the unit...unless you don't get caught. First, see if you can borrow or rent a motorcycle trailer to haul your bike. If that isn't possible, you can fabricate a wheel chock by mounting two 4x4 pieces on plywood (1/2" is best, but 3/8" will work) so they will straddle the front wheel snugly (you may need to add some anti-abrasion material on either side of the wheel to prevent scratching). Make sure the plywood is secure to the trailer (you have to choose the best method depending on whether or not it has wood or metal floor). Next affix tie downs' to the trailer so they allow the tie down straps to pull the front struts at the same/approximate angle of the strut (prevents biding). The best place to attach the front straps is the lower triple clamp, but the engine guard will work if it is heavy/secure enough. You shouldn't need to compress the struts more than 50% of the travel, but make sure you don't bottom them out. Next you need to secure the rear of the bike to ensure it doesn't swing left or right. If it does, the front straps will loosen and the bike will drop. You don't need a lot of tension here, but if you can find wheel tie down straps (I like and use Powertye Manufacturing straps and tie downs...made in USA, too), they work the best. Make sure you use a something to protect the wheel finish when strapping.

That is a brief overview and hope it helps. I have hauled all sizes of bikes for thousands of miles, and I prefer to outfit my trailer with Condor over-center wheel chocks, and multiple tie downs (bolted to the trailer frame) that allow straps to reach from the front of the bike to the trailer deck at as short of an angle as possible. The tie downs for the rear of the bike (the rear wheel) are positioned to allow a larger angle on the straps since the objective is to prevent left/right motion. I prefer the Powertye products as they are heavy duty, offer strap extensions and soft-ties and sleeves to protect paint and metal finishes. Lastly, do NOT use your kickstand while hauling (it will almost always be bent during the haul). Others may have different suggestions, so pick what you think will work best for you.
 

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Lower front forks or around the neck with front wheel in a chock.
Tie downs to rear swing arm or wheel to prevent rear wheel from bouncing or travelling side to side. Don't over tighten pressure on the shocks as you don't need to and want the bike's suspension to work. Over compression of the shock will lead to blown fork seals. Check your tie downs at every stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the tips. Trying to remember all I needed to haul the bike and didn't want any surprises. I'll post pics when I get home of the blue Vintage with hard bags/black seat done up by the dealer. Good Monday to all and hats off to the veterans!
 

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I have a better idea. Set up shipping through the dealer. They have companies they work with who specialize in shipping vehicles, motorcycles. Less risk for probably around the same $$.
 
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