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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am fairly certain, as I am not a newbie, that my bike has a slipping clutch. I have 30K on my 17. If I get on it it jumps up to 4,000 k, but doesn't grab the rear wheel.

I am sure it is the clutch. But why would it die at 30K?

What are the thoughts on Barnett, vs. Indian, vs. Indian high performance clutch?
 

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Did to check the free play? Does it need adjusting? Who does the maintenance? Has the clutch lever been lubed at the proper intervals?
 

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Sounds like you need to adjust your clutch cable.
 

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The clutch in the 111's are merely adequate and if there is insufficient play in the cable that is enuff to apply slight pull to the pressure plate and cause the clutch to slip. At 30,000 miles the cable and the lever pivot pin should be lubed. If after this is done and proper cable play established and the clutch slips than it's time for a new clutch. Go with the Barnett xtra plate kit along with a new barnett cable.

RACNRAY
 

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I had changed to full synthetic oil (Mobil 1) for a time, and noticed the same thing. There's a hill on my daily ride home where I like to get on the throttle, so I can be consistent in my testing. I'm now running Rotella T, and the problem is much improved (maybe gone). Just over 21 K on my '18... interesting topic, actually.
 

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I had changed to full synthetic oil (Mobil 1) for a time, and noticed the same thing. There's a hill on my daily ride home where I like to get on the throttle, so I can be consistent in my testing. I'm now running Rotella T, and the problem is much improved (maybe gone). Just over 21 K on my '18... interesting topic, actually.
As a 43+ year professional m/c mechanic your experience backs up my findings. One, and the most important aspect of oil is to reduce friction. The job of the clutch is to transfer engine tork by guess what??? FRICTION!! Both Mobil one and Shell Rotella T are JASO MA2 rated which provides the latest and highest level of anti-slip for our wet clutches. No doubt in my professional experience and by your description the Mobil one has superior friction reduction characteristics over the Rotella.

I have told peeps thru the years if you put a good quality m/c oil in your skoot and the clutch slips, FIX THE CLUTCH!

RACNRAY
 
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As a 43+ year professional m/c mechanic your experience backs up my findings. One, and the most important aspect of oil is to reduce friction. The job of the clutch is to transfer engine tork by guess what??? FRICTION!! Both Mobil one and Shell Rotella T are JASO MA2 rated which provides the latest and highest level of anti-slip for our wet clutches. No doubt in my professional experience and by your description the Mobil one has superior friction reduction characteristics over the Rotella.

I have told peeps thru the years if you put a good quality m/c oil in your skoot and the clutch slips, FIX THE CLUTCH!

RACNRAY
Yup... I'm taking notes...;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The clutch in the 111's are merely adequate and if there is insufficient play in the cable that is enuff to apply slight pull to the pressure plate and cause the clutch to slip. At 30,000 miles the cable and the lever pivot pin should be lubed. If after this is done and proper cable play established and the clutch slips than it's time for a new clutch. Go with the Barnett xtra plate kit along with a new barnett cable.

RACNRAY
What do you recommend for lube. This newer cables are a little different. On my older EVO bikes I use "dry slide", which a liquid graphite.

And I assume the cable adjustment is just like any cable. You want about a dime worth of play when I pull the cable where it enters the clutch arm control, correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, I've got the manual in my files.



I was more interested in what lube Racin Rey recommends..
 

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Thanks, I've got the manual in my files.



I was more interested in what lube Racin Rey recommends..
What do you recommend for lube. This newer cables are a little different. On my older EVO bikes I use "dry slide", which a liquid graphite.

And I assume the cable adjustment is just like any cable. You want about a dime worth of play when I pull the cable where it enters the clutch arm control, correct?
The fact that you asked about lube and the adjustment led me to believe you have never done it or read about it. Sorry for my assumption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know these cables are a bit different as you don't lube them the same way as the older style. I just need to look at it closely when I get home tonight. I understand the cable to sheating has some kind of seal or something. I just have to get into it.

No worries. I own a Gilroy too. I do all the work on that bike myself. On the new one, I haven't had to do anything. I usually have Arlen Ness service it due to the flash bullshit we go through. But the failing clutch is the first sorta "big" out of pocket issue other than the usual tires and a set of rear brakes.

I was surprised as my older bikes go forever on the clutch packs. But I do lane split damn near every time I ride so clutches and brakes do get a workout whenever I ride. Plus I do ride pretty fast and hard a lot of the time.

Thank you for posting it. I do the same thing a lot of the time on my posts.
 

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Most of the newer type cables are lined with a slippery inner lining, There might be other types now but the original lined cables had a Teflon inner. Lubing them can sometimes cause issues as the lubricants will gum up and then be less slippery than the lining.

If you just lube the pivot points (handlebar lever and pivot at the other end) it will operate easier.

When adjusting the lever, disregard the "dime's worth" thickness and watch for the movement of the cable itself. You just need the barest bit of slack before the cable moves. Any more slack than the barest does you no benefit. Either it is pulling on the cable or it isn’t. The least amount of slack that allows for no pull at all is the right amount. On mine, I can actually pull slightly on the lever before you can see it pull on the cable. If I adjust for a clearance it is too much.

If you still have it slipping, I would take it apart and look into either bead blasting the plates and/or washing them with a solvent. Plates get glazed and slip and oil can get impregnated into the friction material.

On the Norton Commando clutches you only ever bead blast them. They last forever.

And on the Ducati bikes, the Barnett carbon fiber plates have an amazing engagement. Just Terrific.

HTH.
 

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You mention a seal, You don't lube the inside of these cables just the ends. See blue note in the pics. Where they have trouble is the pivot point that needs to be taken apart periodically cleaned and lubed at the lever and the bottom by the clutch. A friend had a victory that failed on the highway by slipping at higher speeds and accelerating. We adjusted the clutch on the side of the highway and when we got back to his house we took it apart cleaned and lubricated it and the problem was gone. The Indian will do the same thing as the Victory if not cleaned and lubed. With 30k it sounds as if they may not have been worked on in a while and that would account for the slipping. Sorry if you know all this and I rambled on.
 

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This is what I have used for YEARS....it is a good chain lube but flings off too much, but werks very well as a clutch cable lube, tho NEVER EVER for throttle cables.
MAXIMA.jpg
 

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Mobil 1 has motorcycle oils for wet clutches. It’s the normal car engine oil you to need avoid due to anti friction additives.

Also, I don’t think most people realize the more slack you leave in the clutch cable the better in a sense. As you tighten the cable it is actually enaging the clutch and disengaging the engine from the driveline same as pulling the lever. It is full engaged when released, so you are disengaging it when you pull the lever (allowing slip if you will). You are adjusting mostly to accommodate cable stretch not clutch wear. If its slipping under heavy acceleration or heavy load, back the adjustment off and allow it to grab more.
 

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Also, I don’t think most people realize the more slack you leave in the clutch cable the better in a sense. As you tighten the cable it is actually enaging the clutch and disengaging the engine from the driveline same as pulling the lever. It is full engaged when released, so you are disengaging it when you pull the lever (allowing slip if you will). You are adjusting mostly to accommodate cable stretch not clutch wear. If its slipping under heavy acceleration or heavy load, back the adjustment off and allow it to grab more.
I leave a bit more slack than most, almost 1/8th inch approximately 3mm. It is much more comfortable do to the size of my hands. (I know there is a lever adjustment and I have adjusted it) Just make sure that when you put the bike in gear with the brake off that the bike does not move forward as it enters into gear.
 
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