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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought the tools to do the spring swap this week. Things didn’t go as planned or be easy as I thought they would of been.

I decided to go with Hanson springs vs the Indian high lift springs. The spring compressor doesn’t work to good with the Hanson springs since they are way taller and wider. I’m going to have to make a longer stud to be able to get the keepers back in place (not a big deal). If your using Indian Springs you’ll be all set.

Now the kicker in all of this, the air tool is aluminum and it comes with a 7/8 hex on the back of the tool. I inserted it into the spark plug hole and gave it a snug. BAD MOVE! I went to take the tool out and it grabbed the last couple threads of the tool (now stuck in the head) my plan is to use a back tap to remove the material stuck in the head (hopefully the head is ok)

My point to this post is to let others know how to use the tool.

Air tool - finger tight only do not even think about snugging it up a tiny bit.

Valve Spring tool - only use if your switching to Indian high lift springs. Anything taller will not work unless you cut a long enough piece of threaded rod.

Hope this helps for anybody thinking of using the tools. Don’t want anyone to make the same mistake as me. I will get through it this weekend once my back tap arrives.
 

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So I bought the tools to do the spring swap this week. Things didn’t go as planned or be easy as I thought they would of been.

I decided to go with Hanson springs vs the Indian high lift springs. The spring compressor doesn’t work to good with the Hanson springs since they are way taller and wider. I’m going to have to make a longer stud to be able to get the keepers back in place (not a big deal). If your using Indian Springs you’ll be all set.

Now the kicker in all of this, the air tool is aluminum and it comes with a 7/8 hex on the back of the tool. I inserted it into the spark plug hole and gave it a snug. BAD MOVE! I went to take the tool out and it grabbed the last couple threads of the tool (now stuck in the head) my plan is to use a back tap to remove the material stuck in the head (hopefully the head is ok)

My point to this post is to let others know how to use the tool.

Air tool - finger tight only do not even think about snugging it up a tiny bit.

Valve Spring tool - only use if your switching to Indian high lift springs. Anything taller will not work unless you cut a long enough piece of threaded rod.

Hope this helps for anybody thinking of using the tools. Don’t want anyone to make the same mistake as me. I will get through it this weekend once my back tap arrives.
Thank You for the very thorough explanation.
I as well as the others appreciate what you did here.
This is why this Forum is so wunderful and valuable to have membership.
 

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IIRC, someone else had issues with the Lloyd'z air tool and its threads. The post is on another thread. As you pointed out, just finger tighten, the 0-ring does the sealing.

I used my leak down tester air hose or compression tester (can't remember which). Much shorter threads then the one you show and it is made out of steel. I put a little anti-seize on anything with threads going into a spark plug hole.

You can also purchase the air hose from Amazon:
Lisle 19700 or Powerbuilt 648457

Air is a good method to use for holding the valves up. I've used that method on all engines I've worked on without taking heads off to do valve work. At 90 psi, the valve is not going anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ouch, that sux. Did you use any lube on the threads before inserting aluminum fitting into the head?
Nope, shoulda used never seize. I ended up fixing the threads and doing the rear cylinder last night. Worked out good the second time around
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
IIRC, someone else had issues with the Lloyd'z air tool and its threads. The post is on another thread. As you pointed out, just finger tighten, the 0-ring does the sealing.

I used my leak down tester air hose or compression tester (can't remember which). Much shorter threads then the one you show and it is made out of steel. I put a little anti-seize on anything with threads going into a spark plug hole.

You can also purchase the air hose from Amazon:
Lisle 19700 or Powerbuilt 648457

Air is a good method to use for holding the valves up. I've used that method on all engines I've worked on without taking heads off to do valve work. At 90 psi, the valve is not going anywhere.
Should of used never seize but dropped the ball on that. Literally gave it a snug didn’t wrench on it. They should have knurled the end for finger use and not put a hex on it. Also maybe some small warnings or instructions, it doesn’t hurt to dumb things down even something as simple as that.

I did 80psi and the valves were not going anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank You for the very thorough explanation.
I as well as the others appreciate what you did here.
This is why this Forum is so wunderful and valuable to have membership.
I’ve had so much help and knowledge here I figured I’d could do my part and save someone a lot of money, time and stress.
 

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I’ve had so much help and knowledge here I figured I’d could do my part and save someone a lot of money, time and stress.
2nd person I've heard here having problems with using that tool dry. Stuff happens. I had all kinds of fun with my valve spring swap, but that's another story. Wish you the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
  • 2nd person I've heard here having problems with using that tool dry. Stuff happens. I had all kinds of fun with my valve spring swap, but that's another story. Wish you the best.
    Thank you sir! Hopefully have it all together for the weekend. I ended up catching the top motor mount bushing and mushing it so I had to order that ($7). I look at as a learning experience, I’ll know exactly what I’m doing when I do the Jeff’s (V-twin performance) V2 116 kit next year.
 

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Thanks Darkhorse!
Man those Hansen springs are way bigger! I'm looking forward to getting into this myself!! Thanks for keeping us posted brother!!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
UPDATE: Removed all the material that was left in the spark plug hole with a back tap. Took me about an hr and half probably 20 passes or more. I’m a happy man 🥳
 
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