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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 17 vintage with 8,000 miles on it and my wife and i took it for a spin , And we noticed the following symptons
when i use the front brake it growls like the pads are already shot, I dont ride it hard so i cant believe they would be worn out already?
The belt or whatever was squeeling non stop for 3hrs, dont know what is causing this but sure is annoying.
When we go over the smallest of bumps there is a thump sound coming from the rear of the bike, Its realy hard to pinpoint it.
And last but not least when im slowing down i can feel a vibration in the floor boards from 1,800-1,700 rpms
So if this all related or im lucky enuff to be cursed with bad gremlins all of a sudden, i sure could use some advice on where to start
 

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Your belt is out of alignment it sounds like. Are you sure it is the front brakes? I'm not sure what "growl" means or sounds like exactly, but I can tell on my rear pads they usually make a little noise when they are breaking-in dirty with the too much brake dust.

I would find it hard to believe front pads could wear out that fast considering you have two up front vs. one in the back. My bike just turned 20K and I am still on the original front pads and they are like 75% still. However, I am on my second set of rears and I wouldn't be surprised if they need replaced when I drop it off tomorrow.

But I drag the back brake in parking lots, slow turns, and mountain twisties so it is just my style of riding. I rarely use the front brake on mountain roads. Engine decompression and rear for me like an old dirt bike before you had front brakes.

All V-twins bikes vibrate at some rpm. I wouldn't sweat that too much. That is more likey personal interpretation. I don't feel any vibration unless I ride sustained 80-90 mph for long periods of time. So I think it is just my own fatigue that causes me to notice.

Good luck and let us know what you find out!
 

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The noise you hear over a bump is common. The rear shock is mounted at the top into the frame but there is no bushing to take up the loose fit. When you go over a significant bump the shock extends fully, then the bike goes a touch higher, and the loose fitting knocks as the pin moves across the gap. If there was a well fitted bushing in there the noise would go away.

Mine sometimes sounds like I've got something loose in the bottom of the saddlebags, and in the beginning that's what I thought it was.
 

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Under the footboards is a hinge pin running parallel to the bike. Check to see if that is tight and preventing your boards from lifting. If so, loosen the bolt just enough to allow movement. This stopped some sympathetic vibration for another forum member a while ago.
 

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Belt alignment gets some attention on the forum. It's somewhere between easy and tricky to get it right. The dealer would probably do it at the next service.

You can also get belt treatments that will take out the squeal. Permatex has one, probably many others. I've seen people rub soap along the side just to quieten down a belt. If you do anything, don't use petroleum or solvent based stuff as some things can damage the material.
 

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The noise you hear over a bump is common. The rear shock is mounted at the top into the frame but there is no bushing to take up the loose fit. When you go over a significant bump the shock extends fully, then the bike goes a touch higher, and the loose fitting knocks as the pin moves across the gap. If there was a well fitted bushing in there the noise would go away.

Mine sometimes sounds like I've got something loose in the bottom of the saddlebags, and in the beginning that's what I thought it was.
I just replaced my rear shock with the adjustable Arnott/Fox shock.
My original (MY17 RM) most certainly had bushings for both shock bolts.
 

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I just replaced my rear shock with the adjustable Arnott/Fox shock.
My original (MY17 RM) most certainly had bushings for both shock bolts.
Maybe it's a quality control issue that leaves some with the noisy fitting. My Springfield DH has the same OEM air shock that came on your RM and it does the noise thing. A bike mechanic mate of mine who runs a performance bike modding shop listed the noisy rear shock among a few things that he criticizes Indian for.
 

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Maybe it's a quality control issue that leaves some with the noisy fitting. My Springfield DH has the same OEM air shock that came on your RM and it does the noise thing. A bike mechanic mate of mine who runs a performance bike modding shop listed the noisy rear shock among a few things that he criticizes Indian for.
Tough fix too on the bottom side. Thats just crappy QC.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
the brake noise is like when the pads are gone and rubbing on the drum, the noise only is generated when i apply the brakes and the clunk noise happens no matter how small the bump , at first ithought it was like bottoming out the shock. All these issues except for the brake grinding are new from last year
 

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Discussion Starter #10
and something totally different ,Last year at around 6,000 miles the head gasket was replaced and before that my bike at times sounded more like a diesel motor and after it is nice and quiet. just thought i would share that
 

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Belt alignment gets some attention on the forum. It's somewhere between easy and tricky to get it right. The dealer would probably do it at the next service.

You can also get belt treatments that will take out the squeal. Permatex has one, probably many others. I've seen people rub soap along the side just to quieten down a belt. If you do anything, don't use petroleum or solvent based stuff as some things can damage the material.
Never under any circumstances use any kind of belt treatment, snake oil, soap, chapstick, K-Y jelly or any other suggested item. It might make the noise go away for a minute, but it will never fix the problem. It's kind of
like prescribing an aspirin to someone that just broke their arm and sending them on their way.

If the belt is making noise, get the alignment sorted. Either learn the process yourself, or take it to a qualified shop to deal with it.
 
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