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So I only have about 3k miles this year on my 20,000 mile 2017 Scout69 since my last oil change (last fall) because I did not ride too much this year (different story). Usually, I change oil in the fall every year before putting it up for the winter. So I'm wondering what people's thoughts are on skipping the oil change this year. That would mean possibly sludge sitting and settling over the winter. I think I know the answer, but wanted to put it out there as a possibility. Thoughts?
 

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I was told to change the oil in the spring or start of the ride season because over winter condensation can accumulate . Not sure if that is correct but I would rather change the oil at the start of the season rather than at the end.
Keep in mind our winters are like minus 35c .
What do you guys think?
 

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Roadmaster Darkhorse
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As previously said. Oil and filters are cheap vs. costly engine damage or repairs.

I sorta practice what I preach here as I keep my service interval at 3,000 miles instead of the 5,000 Polaris recommends. Things like my boat engine and tractor that are lucky to see 50 hours of use per season get an oil and filter change every fall no matter what.

Might also add pretty much all of my stuff including the motorcycles get at least some use year round. It is very unusual to have something sit literally months on end with no use.
 

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2021 Indian Challenger Limited Deepwater Metalic
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When you run an engine the byproducts off the combustion causes contamination of the oil. While the bike sits over winter condensation builds up and causes internal damage.

At a minimum, swap out the oil with cheap oil if you plan on changing the oil in spring.

My recommendation is to change the oil now and then run it in the spring. That removes the corrosive contamination now. In the spring any condensation built up over winter will be burned off during your first ride.
 

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As previously said. Oil and filters are cheap vs. costly engine damage or repairs.

I sorta practice what I preach here as I keep my service interval at 3,000 miles instead of the 5,000 Polaris recommends. Things like my boat engine and tractor that are lucky to see 50 hours of use per season get an oil and filter change every fall no matter what.

Might also add pretty much all of my stuff including the motorcycles get at least some use year round. It is very unusual to have something sit literally months on end with no use.
I thought they recommended 10,000 miles?
 

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Oil intervals used to be shorter due to dino oil and fuel contamination along with other byproducts of combustion. Engines didn’t have tolerances as tight as we have today due to metallurgy and lack of alloys. We used to change oil on carbuerated cars and it came out like water, now at 5k its barely dirty and thick as new. The only reason to change oil more frequently in a bike is it gets contaminated by clutch material. If the book says 10k, go for it. They always error to safe. The little bit of condensation you get will burn off. You probably get more condensation riding in cool weather, warming up/cooling down than sitting in dry storage all winter.
 

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I was told to change the oil in the spring or start of the ride season because over winter condensation can accumulate . Not sure if that is correct but I would rather change the oil at the start of the season rather than at the end.
Keep in mind our winters are like minus 35c .
What do you guys think?
I can sort of see the thinking here, but what if a person drained all the used oil out of the engine at the end of the season and left the crankcase empty, and then in the spring put in brand new oil that has not sat open all winter. The entire top end of the engine isn’t going to know if there’s oil in the case or if it’s empty during storage. Just put a sign on it saying, “No Oil” so no accidental startup happens.
 

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I can sort of see the thinking here, but what if a person drained all the used oil out of the engine at the end of the season and left the crankcase empty, and then in the spring put in brand new oil that has not sat open all winter. The entire top end of the engine isn’t going to know if there’s oil in the case or if it’s empty during storage. Just put a sign on it saying, “No Oil” so no accidental startup happens.
'
YES!


I always get a kick out of people who put fresh oil in for winter
 

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2017 Chieftain Limited, 2022 Chief Bobber Dark Horse
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This is true, but my general rule of thumb is 5k or annual, whichever comes first. Except this year I'm only 3k. Think I'll just go ahead and change it anyway.

BTW: What are thoughts on magnetic thing-a-ma-bob on side of oil filter? Just ordered one...
I’m not aware of any magnets on the outside of filters, but I replaced my drain plugs with ones that have them. There’s a small bit of metal shavings attached whenever I change the oil. That bit of debris is picked up as the oil passes…pretty minor in the whole scheme of things.
 

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This is true, but my general rule of thumb is 5k or annual, whichever comes first. Except this year I'm only 3k. Think I'll just go ahead and change it anyway.

BTW: What are thoughts on magnetic thing-a-ma-bob on side of oil filter? Just ordered one...
No direct experience with them, but I can't see it as a bad thing. One would think that the filter would catch them as well, but having the magnet too is pretty cheap insurance.

I have a 1923 Ford Model T. It has no oil filter. I added a magnet that sticks to the inside of the transmission band cover, which is where the oil gets returned to the pan as it pours over the bands. Whenever I remove that cover the magnet is always covered in fine metal shavings. Had the magnet not been there those shavings would just continue to circulate through the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No direct experience with them, but I can't see it as a bad thing. One would think that the filter would catch them as well, but having the magnet too is pretty cheap insurance.

I have a 1923 Ford Model T. It has no oil filter. I added a magnet that sticks to the inside of the transmission band cover, which is where the oil gets returned to the pan as it pours over the bands. Whenever I remove that cover the magnet is always covered in fine metal shavings. Had the magnet not been there those shavings would just continue to circulate through the engine.
I had a 40HP (or was it 36?) 1957 VW with no oil filter. I remember JC Whitney had a "toilet papar" filter kit that would use a roll of toilet paper as the filter. I think it was an adapter you added to the oil pump cover.
 

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Just start it up once a month for a few minutes and you will be fine.
My understanding is that the engine should be run for at least 15 minutes after reaching full operating temperature to cook off moisture etc.
Winters in my part of KY are such that I can easily find a time once every 2 or 3 weeks to get the bike out for at least 1/2 hour after reaching operating temps. So I change the oil on a standard schedule of between 5k & 7,500k - both of which are always reached in less than a year.
 

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My understanding is that the engine should be run for at least 15 minutes after reaching full operating temperature to cook off moisture etc.
Winters in my part of KY are such that I can easily find a time once every 2 or 3 weeks to get the bike out for at least 1/2 hour after reaching operating temps. So I change the oil on a standard schedule of between 5k & 7,500k - both of which are always reached in less than a year.
Absolutely on warming up to cook off crankcase condensate. If ya don't have the time to do this it's better not to start the engine at all during winter temperature and humidity extremes.
 
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