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Discussion Starter #1
At first I was having issues with the gear indicator lagging (intermittently) then my check engine light went out and codes showed failures with ABS, Rear speed sensor, kick-stand sensor, tip=over sensor and finally my speedometer quit working (I have an 18 Springfield).

Tech at dealership says loose wires were possibly the fault and cleared codes but problems still persist. I find it incredible that loose wires would cause all these issues to occure at the same time.

My question is: Is there a sending or receiving unit that drives all these sensors that may have gone bad?

Unfortunatly the head mechanic is on vacation, the tech that is working on it is a junior tech and isn't up to speed on electrical systems and they have had my bike for almost 2 weeks now.

Any help would be appreciated. (byw: bike runs ok, just no ABS or speedo, engine light on, etc.)
 

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Could be a badly pinned connector. I don’t know or have a diagram to see how the Springfield is laid out. Could be a network wire shorting causing communication issues. For having it two weeks, they could have just replaced the whole harness and been done. That’s what we do in our shop, though Diesel engines are obviously different. Once I determine the harness is at fault, that ***** is coming out.
 

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Not losse wires. Way too many wires going on there to different systems.

Two options: (actually a predecessor option is to get a new dealer!)

1. Sensors -- particularly ABS -- can be highly sensitive to voltage fluctuations. They are like the canary at the mine mouth when it comes to that. You might -- just might, please -- have a voltage variability or shorting issue. So one thing that could evidence itself across so many systems is bad voltage. Check battery, connections, etc. You don't mention if it does this while running, but make sure you are getting between 14.3 and 14.7 v. when bike is running. If not, could be rectifier.

2. All these systems do run through the VCM (Vehicle Control Module) although they are on different circuits. Still, an erratic ground on the VCM could cause this.

Electrical issues are tough for almost any dealer, but you should insist with Polaris that they back up your dealer on the diagnostics. Your dealer should be on the phone, not you. Polaris balks at owners calling, but if you do, get past the high schoolers on the call center line and ask to have it escalated. If you need a name, PM me.
 

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particularly ABS
An ABS sensor is a simple Hall Effect sensor and creates its own voltage, usually one wheel rotation per second is roughly 1.5-2v. The module, wherever it may be on these bikes, interprets the signal created by the sensor to determine wheel speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Faults are present while riding. I tend to agree, sounds like voltage issue.

Dealership is well known, unfortunately their head tech is out till Monday. Guess I’ll just have to wait for his diagnosis.

Sounds like an easy fix for him when he gets back and hopefully they won’t have to order any parts.


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Discussion Starter #6
The Speedo issue is weird though, they tapped on it and it worked for a bit. Then they pulled it and put it back in and it failed again.


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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your replies, I’m feeling better about it now


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Sounds similar to when my VCM went out...
I agree. Even discrete sensors use a voltage reference. The one thing in common would be the VCM. A weak ground for the VCM or some stray voltage potential looking for a ground that finds it thru the discrete circuits would make sense here. I would do a voltage and ground check to the VCM and it that was good a replacement VCM would be next. Dean
 

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I don't think it effects any of that. I just reloaded my map and vroom vroom vroom... Lol It was actually very painless for me, the hardest part was figuring out the issue.
 

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Well that isn't good news. So much for all of my fuel-mapping data and my PCVX unit if they have to replace the computer.
That is a different computer. The ECM holds the mapping and controls for the engine. The VCM is the module that controls all the bike functions. D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
“The waiting is the hardest part”


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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks Dean, I don’t know much about the electrical system (neither does the junior tech apparently). I just ride the damn thing! Simple shit I can handle but that’s about it.


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Can you give me the actual fault codes please?
The p codes will determine a diagnostic route and I can have a look at manual at my end and see what help i can offer
Only 3 faults can occur in wiring
1 - open circuit
2 - short to ground
3 - high resistance

Shops are quick to just replace parts till fault is "fixed" without actually doing diagnostic work to find the cause of fault and rectify it
 

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Unfortunatly the head mechanic is on vacation, the tech that is working on it is a junior tech and isn't up to speed on electrical systems and they have had my bike for almost 2 weeks now.
Not being helpful here. ...I was wondering who schedules the vacation/holiday time off at the dealership? o_O

.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Can you give me the actual fault codes please?
The p codes will determine a diagnostic route and I can have a look at manual at my end and see what help i can offer
Only 3 faults can occur in wiring
1 - open circuit
2 - short to ground
3 - high resistance

Shops are quick to just replace parts till fault is "fixed" without actually doing diagnostic work to find the cause of fault and rectify it

I don't have the codes except #84 (rear wheel speed sensor) and also ABS. But i know there were at least (5) additional codes including side-stand, tip over and speedometer and check engine light. Bike is at dealership.
 

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An ABS sensor is a simple Hall Effect sensor and creates its own voltage, usually one wheel rotation per second is roughly 1.5-2v. The module, wherever it may be on these bikes, interprets the signal created by the sensor to determine wheel speed.
Interesting. Did not know that. My bike was showing bad voltage ABS sensor right before the bike went to limp mode and then died. The problem was a bad wiring harness. Dealer had told me that voltages from ABS were sensitive to inbound voltages, but it makes sense that the sensor generates its own signal (and voltage.)
 

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Never, ever, discount the insidious role of gremlins in any electrical problem. There are days when I'm convinced electrons just don't want to go to ground through the path fo least resistant but instead wander around like charged drunks.
 
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