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Discussion Starter #1
This question / comment should apply to all Scouts I think.

My radiator fan cuts on at 206 and the temperature goes to 208 then works its way down to 199, at that point the fan cuts out and the cycle repeats. When I'm just cruising continuously I run at 175-177.

I wonder if the fan could be set to cut on a few degrees lower and cut out at a few degrees lower.

In city traffic I'd like the running temps to be a little lower.
 

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Im not entirely certain but the way I understand it, if you have a tune, it can be adjusted like you are suggesting. You’d need to contact the tuner for them to send a new file
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Im not entirely certain but the way I understand it, if you have a tune, it can be adjusted like you are suggesting. You’d need to contact the tuner for them to send a new file
All I am interested in is having the cooling fan cut in and out at different temperatures than it is currently set to do. I figure it is unlikely that can be done, but am curious if anyone knows more about it.
 

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Why?
Are you an automotive engineer? ;)

My bike (Scout 69) runs the same, as does my wife's 60.
The temps are chosen carefully by those who designed the engine to optimize performance and longevity.

Ever think of changing the operating temperature of your car engine? I doubt it.

I'd leave it alone, if I were you.
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Why?
Are you an automotive engineer? ;)

My bike (Scout 69) runs the same, as does my wife's 60.
The temps are chosen carefully by those who designed the engine to optimize performance and longevity.

Ever think of changing the operating temperature of your car engine? I doubt it.

I'd leave it alone, if I were you.
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
I just wonder about stuff like this. Too much free time maybe. LOL
 

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I had a BMW S1000XR and it would get up to 220F in traffic, just normal for the beast. Others had the same thing and running down the road it would be in the 185-190 range. Oil analysis said that it was just fine. Some motors just run hotter than others. If it was made to run there then it is fine.
 

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It's been a long time since I had a Scout but I think that there's a on/off temp setting for the fan in the ECM. You can set it with a PVCX and PowerCore software, and I think Fuel Moto tunes set it 5 degrees below stock. My memory of that might be hazy so you'd need to check what's happening with them.
 

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Ever think of changing the operating temperature of your car engine? I doubt it.

I'd leave it alone, if I were you.
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
In my younger years we sometimes changed running temps in our cars. It was an easy thing to swap out the thermostat in the top of the radiator for one with a different temp threshold. We would do it for summer/winter driving in a highly variable climate.

When I had the Scout and was in slowly moving traffic in summer, the fan kicking in would roast my legs. I would have appreciated the ability to drop that initial roast temp down a few degrees. My Kawasaki fan does the same but the seating position means I don't get the hot blast to my thighs like I used to get with the Scout.
 

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Surprised it was in the radiator, and not next to the waterpump.
Back in the 1960s/70s the thermostat was generally in the top radiator hose, either at the radiator end or where it connects to the block. The fan was running continually from the motor, very different from the more efficient electrically controlled fans or recent years. Engine management and design has changed so much over the years that I wouldn't even know where my Outback has it.
 

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In my younger years we sometimes changed running temps in our cars. It was an easy thing to swap out the thermostat in the top of the radiator for one with a different temp threshold. We would do it for summer/winter driving in a highly variable climate.

When I had the Scout and was in slowly moving traffic in summer, the fan kicking in would roast my legs. I would have appreciated the ability to drop that initial roast temp down a few degrees. My Kawasaki fan does the same but the seating position means I don't get the hot blast to my thighs like I used to get with the Scout.
I remember those days! Remember adjusting points and changing the condenser?

Our Scouts do not produce the same heat. None, that we have noticed, but I would note that we are very rarely in stopped traffic.

I wonder if a little fin, added to the back of the fan, could redirect the hot air for you?

Maybe add one with zip ties and see if it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Back in the 1960s/70s the thermostat was generally in the top radiator hose, either at the radiator end or where it connects to the block. The fan was running continually from the motor, very different from the more efficient electrically controlled fans or recent years. Engine management and design has changed so much over the years that I wouldn't even know where my Outback has it.
My 1972 Dodge Demon had the thermostat right on the Block where the top radiator hose connected. Incredibly easy to get to. Those days are gone forever.
 

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When I had the Scout and was in slowly moving traffic in summer, the fan kicking in would roast my legs. I would have appreciated the ability to drop that initial roast temp down a few degrees.
Think about it. If you drop that temp by a few degrees, it starts roasting your legs sooner...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Think about it. If you drop that temp by a few degrees, it starts roasting your legs sooner...
I guess the best solution is to keep moving. ;). I'm lucky in that most of my riding is country roads and very little stop and go. Especially this time of year.
 
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I had read that some of the GM motors had changed where they put the thermostat because up top it would cause surging in the water temperature until everything stabilized. Thermostat got hot, open up and in the bottom of the block a huge gulp of cold (relative to the engine) water would go in, then the thermostat would cool and close again. It would cycle like this a few times before everything normalized. By moving the thermostat they could have a more consistent water temperature. I don't remember what problem they were solving with the cycling of the water temp, probably emissions.
 

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^^ I've seen people drill one or two small holes in the thermostat "valve" plate to prevent just that. Basically so it a leaks a little all the time even when it's closed.
 

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^^ I've seen people drill one or two small holes in the thermostat "valve" plate to prevent just that. Basically so it a leaks a little all the time even when it's closed.
I have done it. By "leaking" the water can better flow around both sides of the thermostat and it gives a better opening rate. It also helps in filling the cooling system because the air can escape without having to heat the engine up to where the thermostat opens.
 
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