Indian Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015 Scout (#69) which is due for some new brake fluid. As a first-run bike it is (thankfully) without ABS, and I'm wondering if I need special equipment to do a brake bleed? I've been doing my own bike brake service for decades, but for some reason I'n a bit gunshy about doing my Scout, in part as a result of reading some of the posts here. Thanks to all who respond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
It's a very easy bike to service-if you've bled brakes before it will be about as quick as you've ever done. Simplest caliper design, very much like a pickup truck!
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
1,895 Posts
I'm having a spongy rear brake issue right now.
Had to replace the rear master cylinder/reservoir and brake peg after an accident. I've bled my rear for hours using a "mitey vac" as well as just some aquarium tubing and an 8mm wrench but to no avail. I also tried to force bleed the brakes from the caliper up to the reservoir without success. Went through two containers of DOT4 with minor results, and then I tried the TID (tie it down) method for 24 hrs. (seen in the tech section of this forum). No results. Dealer says they have a tool to properly bleed the rear brakes but won't say what it is, as they want to do the work (expensive!). I know how a Scouts rear brake should feel like, as my wife also rides a Scout.

I've been bleeding brakes on my own cars, trucks, and motorcycles since 1970 and have never had an issue like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I'm having a spongy rear brake issue right now.
Had to replace the rear master cylinder/reservoir and brake peg after an accident. I've bled my rear for hours using a "mitey vac" as well as just some aquarium tubing and an 8mm wrench but to no avail. I also tried to force bleed the brakes from the caliper up to the reservoir without success. Went through two containers of DOT4 with minor results, and then I tried the TID (tie it down) method for 24 hrs. (seen in the tech section of this forum). No results. Dealer says they have a tool to properly bleed the rear brakes but won't say what it is, as they want to do the work (expensive!). I know how a Scouts rear brake should feel like, as my wife also rides a Scout.

I've been bleeding brakes on my own cars, trucks, and motorcycles since 1970 and have never had an issue like this.
You might want to try this rear brake bleed procedure from Indian. I guess the important part is tipping the master cylinder forward. For me, I tipped the master cylinder forward and did a reverse bleed. Worked out well for me to cure a soft rear brake pedal on my 2018.
 

Attachments

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
1,895 Posts
That Rear Brake Bleed Proceedure is for all Scout models 2017+ with ABS.

My 2016 does not have ABS.

Different Proceedure.
But thanks any way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
That Rear Brake Bleed Proceedure is for all Scout models 2017+ with ABS.

My 2016 does not have ABS.

Different Proceedure.
But thanks any way.
But the master cylinder is in the same position. As I understand, the problem is air gets trapped in the master cylinder because of the angle the master cylinder is mounted. Tipping that master cylinder forward causes the trapped air to be pushed out. The reverse bleed (not part of the procedure) I find to be quite effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
But the master cylinder is in the same position. As I understand, the problem is air gets trapped in the master cylinder because of the angle the master cylinder is mounted. Tipping that master cylinder forward causes the trapped air to be pushed out. The reverse bleed (not part of the procedure) I find to be quite effective.
If, during the bleeding procedure, no air is permitted to enter the line by maintaining a fairly constant fluid level in master cylinder, I would assume that tipping the rear master would not be necessary. Correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
But the master cylinder is in the same position. As I understand, the problem is air gets trapped in the master cylinder because of the angle the master cylinder is mounted. Tipping that master cylinder forward causes the trapped air to be pushed out. The reverse bleed (not part of the procedure) I find to be quite effective.
Gunner3773 is correct. Non ABS or ABS have the same issue with the rear brake master cylinder and if you let any air into the line whilst servicing etc. then some will get trapped at the front of the master cylinder due to the upward angle of the piston within. You have to tip it forward as described and should see the air bubbles come out. Oh, and be careful not to expose the small fluid outlet inside the cylinder to air at the same time as you pump fluid out, otherwise you will draw more air into the line - keep it topped up as you go.
Cover any nearby paintwork too, in case you get some fluid splatter come out. If you do not tip the master cylinder forward you will never get rid of that trapped air that causes the spongy pedal!

If you do not let any air in whilst simply flushing the brake system through to service change fluid, you will not have a problem and will not have to tip the master cylinder(y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Ditto on the tipping master cylinder, it works. I put the extended reach foot controls on(since took them off) and had to go to the store for more brake fluid cause I went through first bottle. Then remembered the old Ford superduty has a clutch master pointing up and we had to remove to bleed it. Pulled the scout and instantly pumped up, hard pedal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
And if you add reverse bleeding with tipping the master cylinder, you will get a very positive result. I had to bleed my rear brake since it has been soft since the day I picked my Scout up. And after what happened during delivery of my Scout, I decided my selling dealer will never service my bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I recently had a similar issue with bleeding my brakes on my 18 Scout Bobber w/ABS. After many days and attempts to bleed the brakes I still had pressure issues. Finally, after discussing with the local dealership (Daytona Beach) I brought it in. It took the service tech 15 minutes and the issue was fixed. I was told that the air was indeed trapped in the ABS module and the only way I could have fixed the issue was having to emergency brake while riding. Basically, the technician hooked my bike up to the computer system at the shop which allowed them to "cycle the system". Shop only charged me half-hour for labor. Sucks that I was unable to fix at home but just relieved to have the bike 100% and back up and running. Best of luck and ride safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Or, take the bike out on a quiet road or to a car park or similar and stomp on your rear brake at 10-15 mph so the ABS pump activates to prevent a skid. Do this a few times then take it home and re-bleed. Worked a treat on mine and nil cost:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Can someone please explain "reverse bleeding"? Do you push brake fluid from the nipple on the caliper up the system to into the reservoir and suck the excess out there with a syringe or how does that work?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Can someone please explain "reverse bleeding"? Do you push brake fluid from the nipple on the caliper up the system to into the reservoir and suck the excess out there with a syringe or how does that work?
Hi JoyRider,

There are loads of video's on YouTube that show the process. Type in "motorcycle reverse brake bleed" or similar and you will find all you need to know (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top