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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
To those with a 2019-2021 Scout Bobber with ABS.

I was looking at what I believe is the ABS module (could it be a voltage regulator?) at the bottom rear of the frame, just in front of the forward part of the rear tire and it looks like there are at least 2, maybe 3 plug connections just dangling there - with no caps or covers on them. I am talking about when you are looking up at it from under the rear back of the bike - just in front of the rear tire at the rear base of the chassis.

Can anyone else look and see if they have the same? They may be connections for diagnostics but regardless I would think they should be plugged or capped to keep water out.

My ABS seems to be working fine and I have no codes or anything but I’m trying to nail down what appears to be a recurring short of the chassis circuit breaker when the bike has been washed/sprayed down that doesn’t resolve for a number of days until whatever it is that got wet and shorted dries out. I have a separate thread on that issue HERE and am wondering if these exposed plugs might be the problem. First step is to determine if everyone else with ABS as these same exposed plugs down by the ABS module or voltage regulator or whatever that part is....

Thanks in advance for help/replies.
 

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To those with a 2019-2021 Scout Bobber with ABS.

I was looking at what I believe is the ABS module (could it be a voltage regulator?) at the bottom rear of the frame, just in front of the forward part of the rear tire and it looks like there are at least 2, maybe 3 plug connections just dangling there - with no caps or covers on them. Can anyone else look and see if they have the same? They may be connections for diagnostics but regardless I would think they should be plugged or capped to keep water out.

My ABS seems to be working fine and I have no codes or anything but I’m trying to nail down what appears to be a recurring short of the chassis circuit breaker when the bike has been washed/sprayed down that doesn’t resolve for a number of days until whatever it is that got wet and shorted dries out. I have a separate thread on that issue HERE and am wondering if these exposed plugs might be the problem. First step is to determine if everyone else with ABS as these same exposed plugs down by the ABS module or voltage regulator or whatever that part is....

Thanks in advance for help/replies.
I have a 2019 ABS and the unit is where you described under the battery box. There are no loose connectors on mine. On our ABS, 4 brake lines connect to it, but those would look obvious. There are two other connections running from the rear caliper into that area, all ABS related. Directly below that space is a "heat sink" type unit, with two weatherseal connectors plugged into it. Hope this helps.
 

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I have a few plug connections on my 2019 Bobber ABS just dangling there as well. Think they were like that since I bought the bike.
 

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These connectors seem to be for the mandatory EPA canister on the Californian version of the bike. From top to bottom you find ABS module, EPA canister, and voltage regulator.
 

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In 2019 I think all scout with ABS were equipped with the European spec harness. 1 plug is for the EPA canister, and the other is for the kickstand safety switch the U.S. bike didn’t get. You’ll notice on your gauge cluster there is a S in a circle. That’s to warn you on bikes equipped with the switch that your stand is down. I’ve been considering buying the switch but it’s expensive and don’t really want to find out the computer has to be programmed for it to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies guys.

Now I know what is down there and that there seem to be some exposed plugs, and my particular bike was not a “one off” where someone on the production line was asleep on the assembly line.

I’m wondering if those exposed, uncapped plugs are a vulnerability to water intrusion and the recurring problem I’ve had where, after spraying down the bike - which included where those exposed electrical plugs are, and are just as exposed to getting wet if driving in/after a rainstorm - can cause the chassis short I’ve experienced?

Has anyone else had such a problem after washing/spraying down the bike?
 

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Has anyone else had such a problem after washing/spraying down the bike?
I haven't had any issues like that even after getting caught in severe rainstorms but capping them wouldn't hurt. Think I will do that too just in case.

When wsshing the bike, I usually take the seat off and cover the battery area with a plastic bag. That way the seat doesn't get all wet and soapy and the electronics stay dry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks BDR. I had made it a point NOT to spray the area around the seat where the fuse block is below it. I did spray my windshield area (National Cycle Deflector screen) which would include the gauge and handlebar switches and also sprayed the rims which would have gotten water around the ABS module, voltage regulator and those exposed connector plugs. But I’m not talking about a “Noah’s Ark”, “Biblical level” flooding of water, it was mostly a fairly light and quick mist-over, like a light and quick passing shower... But I’m at this point nearly 100% sure the root problem is something excessively exposed to water causing my problem.

I have yet to spot test wetting different sections at a time to try and replicate and isolate what is getting wet to the point that the short happens, but when I do and am - hopefully - successful will report back here.

In the meantime, any additional feedback or ideas from the community is appreciated.
 
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