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Hoping to ride a part of Route 66 this summer when things settle down. But cruising the entire length is not an option. My question: are some parts better than others - as far as historical sites? If so, what are your favorite sections? I appreciate any suggestions you would like to offer.
 

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Pick up a book on Route 66 by Mike & Susan Wallace. They are experts on 66. We did it a number of years ago with HOG. They were on the tour and would meet with us every other evening and explain the best places to stop.
 

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Even though it starts in Illinois and goes through Missouri, most of the old road is gone. Ill is now I-55, parts of MO is I-44. There might be one or two touristy spots, but not worth the ride. However, there are several better roads to get to Oklahoma.
 

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My brother and I just rode it last year, starting in Chicago to Santa Monica, then back through the Grand Canyon up to South Dakota for Sturgis. The best parts, for us, were riding through the southern most portions, Oklahoma to Arizona through Texas was amazing and lots of sites to see. AND THE FOOD arrggghhh. Where are you starting from could make all the difference.
 

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My brother and I just rode it last year, starting in Chicago to Santa Monica, then back through the Grand Canyon up to South Dakota for Sturgis. The best parts, for us, were riding through the southern most portions, Oklahoma to Arizona through Texas was amazing and lots of sites to see. AND THE FOOD arrggghhh. Where are you starting from could make all the difference.
Is that a bad ARRGGGHHH or a good ARRGGGHHH?
 
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I do Not recall Rt66 going into Texas... but I know right where it used to come to a Sudden Halt somewhere close to Oatman, AZ... this in 1989.... Brand New HD

Since I would ride 100 miles of Gravel Road before even 1 Mile of Expressway... I will Not be traveling Rt66... Now... Michigan's Rt66?? Kinda Fun!!! And I know where the Taverns are...
 

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I do Not recall Rt66 going into Texas... but I know right where it used to come to a Sudden Halt somewhere close to Oatman, AZ... this in 1989.... Brand New HD

Since I would ride 100 miles of Gravel Road before even 1 Mile of Expressway... I will Not be traveling Rt66... Now... Michigan's Rt66?? Kinda Fun!!! And I know where the Taverns are...
It goes through the Texas panhandle.
 

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GOOD Arrggghhh, Love some Tex Mex.
Last week, one of our better Tex Mex restaurants (we have a few hundred in the area) offered up a lunch special -- Free Tacos from 10 AM. I guess they needed the business. It made the local paper the next day. Cars were stretched back for two blocks waiting in line.
 

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I did the RT 66 a few years ago in a 2018 Mustang. I could only do half at a time so we did the west route first from Springfield, Missouri (Bass Pro Shop HQ) to the Santa Monica, CA pier. It took six days total there and back from my home in West Tennessee. The second half I drove to downtown Chicago, IL to Springfield MO and it only took four days. The scenery is a lot better on the western half but the food was a lot better on the eastern half. It was very interesting as we drove from sun up to sun down everyday but stopped at every attraction we could find on the map/tour book. There are a lot of good tour books out there that we used to find all the interesting places. I think we drove on every square inch that was left of the original road. It was a very fun trip and I would like to do it again on my motorcycle in the future.

Tim
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Rt 66 santa monica pier.jpg
 

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Thanks everyone! Thehueypilot - I have stood under the Chicago sign in your first pic. 👍
 

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Some of the best of Route 66 is found in Arizona but riding it in the summer is not for wussies... Oatman is one of our favorite stops as we enjoy socializing with the burro's and the ride out of Oatman down to Topock on 66 is awesome! If you are coming west in the summer be sure and get an evaporative/wet vest as they work very well... think personal Swamp Cooler.

(y)
 

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Some of the best of Route 66 is found in Arizona but riding it in the summer is not for wussies... Oatman is one of our favorite stops as we enjoy socializing with the burro's and the ride out of Oatman down to Topock on 66 is awesome! If you are coming west in the summer be sure and get an evaporative/wet vest as they work very well... think personal Swamp Cooler.

(y)
I did not buy the t-shirt but took a picture of it. The running joke was the burros were like true Democrat’s.....all looking for free hand outs.

Tim
1FC25343-5D5D-4E48-8D51-514A3D85563E.jpeg
 

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Hoping to ride a part of Route 66 this summer when things settle down. But cruising the entire length is not an option. My question: are some parts better than others - as far as historical sites? If so, what are your favorite sections? I appreciate any suggestions you would like to offer.
Really depends on where you start. My neighbor and I and one of his buddies took a week off last June from Colorado, had to take I-25 straight south to Albuquerque because there was a snow storm that hit a couple of days before we left. Made it to Holbrook Az the first day, stayed in the wigwam tee-pee's just because. Winslow AZ the next day on down to Sedona and back up to Williams for the second night where you can get on a good chunk there.From Williams to Kingman is really nice with a few little towns in between. We rode back to Williams and made it up to the Grand Canyon for sunset, beautiful. On over to Oatman, great ride, desolate and hot. Down into Lake Havasu and dipped into Needles California where Snoopy's brother Spike lives. Can find a statue of him in the subway. That was about as far into California I wanted to go, didnt spend a dime and made it to Laughlin Nev, for the next night. On up to the Hoover Dam, and Vegas, rode the Red Rock national park loop just outside of the city, neat ride. Stayed there and got up and out early into Saint George and back home along the front range. Overall we did 3500 miles in 7 days. Some days were long and hot. Hydrate like crazy and stop often.
 

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New Mexico has some fantastic riding but I wouldn't say that the best or anywhere near the best is on Rt66. Then there's the issue of whether you consider pre or post 1937 Rt 66. The route differs a bit in NM. You will see some great scenery but I'd consider making a few detours along the way to ride some better routes. I won't derail your thread with other suggestions but wanted to point that out for NM at least. If you'd like some options for NM, I'm happy to share.
 

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New Mexico has some fantastic riding but I wouldn't say that the best or anywhere near the best is on Rt66. Then there's the issue of whether you consider pre or post 1937 Rt 66. The route differs a bit in NM. You will see some great scenery but I'd consider making a few detours along the way to ride some better routes. I won't derail your thread with other suggestions but wanted to point that out for NM at least. If you'd like some options for NM, I'm happy to share.
👍
 

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Hoping to ride a part of Route 66 this summer when things settle down. But cruising the entire length is not an option. My question: are some parts better than others - as far as historical sites? If so, what are your favorite sections? I appreciate any suggestions you would like to offer.
I have ridden the entire route several times. There are portions that start to get interesting coming out of Missouri. There are small sections of the "Old Highway" that are very narrow and pop out of Missouri for 13 miles of Kansas and then into Oklahoma. There are some portions that are somewhat interesting in Oklahoma but most of the old highway are now interstate. Coming out of west Texas where you see the Cadillac Ranch is when things begin to liven up. I always loved the ride starting at Tucumcari,, New Mexico all the way through New Mexico and into Arizona. Both of those states are just flat our enchanting. Early fall and late spring are the best times to ride those areas. The colors of the red rock countryside cannot be matched. The clear blue skies and the crisp air is great. you will get to see the Painted Desert, Petrified Forest and a day in Santa Fe downtown is great. Try a meal at the Bull Ring restaurant or the Blue Corn Cafe. Flagstaff Arizona provides soooo much to look at around the area, like Sedona and all of the red rock in that area. You could spend several days around the Flagstaff area. There are a lot of ruins in that area. I do not have enough room to cover all that you could see in that stretch of road through New Mexico and Arizona. Stay out of California. You have to spend the night in the La Posada hotel in Winslow, Arizona. Incredible restaurant and a place built when the Harvey Girls were in style. You can take your picture "Standing on the corner in Winslow, Arizona." By far, the best motorcycle tour guide for the entire country is "Great American Motorcycle Tours" by Gary McKechnie. This is all you need to tour the US. He goes into routes, places to stay and eat and places to avoid. I have used that book for years. Have fun.
 

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I have ridden the entire route several times. There are portions that start to get interesting coming out of Missouri. There are small sections of the "Old Highway" that are very narrow and pop out of Missouri for 13 miles of Kansas and then into Oklahoma. There are some portions that are somewhat interesting in Oklahoma but most of the old highway are now interstate. Coming out of west Texas where you see the Cadillac Ranch is when things begin to liven up. I always loved the ride starting at Tucumcari,, New Mexico all the way through New Mexico and into Arizona. Both of those states are just flat our enchanting. Early fall and late spring are the best times to ride those areas. The colors of the red rock countryside cannot be matched. The clear blue skies and the crisp air is great. you will get to see the Painted Desert, Petrified Forest and a day in Santa Fe downtown is great. Try a meal at the Bull Ring restaurant or the Blue Corn Cafe. Flagstaff Arizona provides soooo much to look at around the area, like Sedona and all of the red rock in that area. You could spend several days around the Flagstaff area. There are a lot of ruins in that area. I do not have enough room to cover all that you could see in that stretch of road through New Mexico and Arizona. Stay out of California. You have to spend the night in the La Posada hotel in Winslow, Arizona. Incredible restaurant and a place built when the Harvey Girls were in style. You can take your picture "Standing on the corner in Winslow, Arizona." By far, the best motorcycle tour guide for the entire country is "Great American Motorcycle Tours" by Gary McKechnie. This is all you need to tour the US. He goes into routes, places to stay and eat and places to avoid. I have used that book for years. Have fun.
Thanks! Definitely want to hang with Glenn Frey under the sign. 👍
 
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