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We just returned from another Springfield - RV "Road Trip". We towed the SF {we have a 6 X 10' cargo trailer} the 180 miles to our campground on the Mogollon Rim behind our 24' Class C motorhome. Spent the next two days doing 6+ hour rides riding 260 miles a day on some incredible roads.

IMG_0212.JPG


Day one we headed south down through Payson and on to Roosevelt Lake. Highway 188 skirts the entire 26-mile eastern shore and if you like sweepers, this is your kind of road. We connected with 60 at Globe and after a quick lunch, launched north for the 82-mile ride to Show Low. The highlight of this stretch has to be the Salt River Canyon... think the best of the Grand Canyon and Sedona rolled into one, albeit smaller package.

The heavy winter rains and snow have the Salt River Roaring at levels not noted in nearly 20 years. Arizona is as green and lush as I have ever seen over the last 15 years here. We had no wind and the temps averaged mid 60's to well into the 80's on day one.

Here are a couple of shots of the Salt River Canyon {Take note of the highway carving through the canyon in the background}:

oN2a0BGMTXiAhYa8ge%aXw.jpg
V0wlma9BSoyEKkKkHAfSew.jpg


Once we reached Show Low we headed west on 260 which closed our loop 63 miles later just below the top of the Rim.

Day two: We headed back through Payson turning north on 87 twisting and turning through Pine, Strawberry and Happy Jack. We even saw a patch of snow somewhere north of 7K'. We picked up Lake Mary Road off of 87 and rode all the way into Flagstaff. The lakes are all at record levels and Snowbowl up on Mt Humphries is doing land-office business with plans to keep the ski resort open through most if not all
of May.

Since we were already that far north we just "had" to ride down 89A from north to south through Oak Creek Canyon for a late breakfast in Sedona. Fortunately, last year when we took this ride it was 0800 and not a single vehicle between us and Sedona and yes, I took full advantage... but I digress. Yesterday's ride was in bumper to bumper traffic and Sedona was a freaking circus that we attributed to many folks being on Spring Break, Arrrg!

A great breakfast helped and we geared up and blew town through waaaay too much traffic and by noon it was 85 degrees. We saw 95 by the time we got out on 179 and connected with I-17 just north of the Verde Valley. By taking 260 east off of I-17 and up the 31-mile climb back to 87 we found temps back in the low 70's and life was good again.

More twisties then sweepers coming and going but enough of both with awesome scenery kept us smiling. Got back to camp at 3 and settled in for some more fun enjoying, as we do every night, a roaring fire, cocktails, and a great dinner.

Our next trip will be back to Big Lake on the eastern side of the White Mountains and just a short ride from the Devil's Highway {old 666 now 191 - people kept stealing the signs}. Almost time for tires and the 15K mile service is due after a year of too much fun. If you have not ridden Arizona... you really should!

:):):)
 

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We just returned from another Springfield - RV "Road Trip". We towed the SF {we have a 6 X 10' cargo trailer} the 180 miles to our campground on the Mogollon Rim behind our 24' Class C motorhome. Spent the next two days doing 6+ hour rides riding 260 miles a day on some incredible roads.

View attachment 484392

Day one we headed south down through Payson and on to Roosevelt Lake. Highway 188 skirts the entire 26-mile eastern shore and if you like sweepers, this is your kind of road. We connected with 60 at Globe and after a quick lunch, launched north for the 82-mile ride to Show Low. The highlight of this stretch has to be the Salt River Canyon... think the best of the Grand Canyon and Sedona rolled into one, albeit smaller package.

The heavy winter rains and snow have the Salt River Roaring at levels not noted in nearly 20 years. Arizona is as green and lush as I have ever seen over the last 15 years here. We had no wind and the temps averaged mid 60's to well into the 80's on day one.

Here are a couple of shots of the Salt River Canyon {Take note of the highway carving through the canyon in the background}:

View attachment 484388 View attachment 484390

Once we reached Show Low we headed west on 260 which closed our loop 63 miles later just below the top of the Rim.

Day two: We headed back through Payson turning north on 87 twisting and turning through Pine, Strawberry and Happy Jack. We even saw a patch of snow somewhere north of 7K'. We picked up Lake Mary Road off of 87 and rode all the way into Flagstaff. The lakes are all at record levels and Snowbowl up on Mt Humphries is doing land-office business with plans to keep the ski resort open through most if not all
of May.

Since we were already that far north we just "had" to ride down 89A from north to south through Oak Creek Canyon for a late breakfast in Sedona. Fortunately, last year when we took this ride it was 0800 and not a single vehicle between us and Sedona and yes, I took full advantage... but I digress. Yesterday's ride was in bumper to bumper traffic and Sedona was a freaking circus that we attributed to many folks being on Spring Break, Arrrg!

A great breakfast helped and we geared up and blew town through waaaay too much traffic and by noon it was 85 degrees. We saw 95 by the time we got out on 179 and connected with I-17 just north of the Verde Valley. By taking 260 east off of I-17 and up the 31-mile climb back to 87 we found temps back in the low 70's and life was good again.

More twisties then sweepers coming and going but enough of both with awesome scenery kept us smiling. Got back to camp at 3 and settled in for some more fun enjoying, as we do every night, a roaring fire, cocktails, and a great dinner.

Our next trip will be back to Big Lake on the eastern side of the White Mountains and just a short ride from the Devil's Highway {old 666 now 191 - people kept stealing the signs}. Almost time for tires and the 15K mile service is due after a year of too much fun. If you have not ridden Arizona... you really should!

:):):)
Yup, the desert is amazing.... Most people think it is just sand and mild hills, NOT true....
 

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I lived in Payson for 20 years and have enjoyed all of those roads many times over on the bike.
Glad you are experiencing some great rides in a truly beautiful and unique area.

Rawhide
 

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We have a Tiffin class A motorhome and want to get an enclosed trailer for the RM. I'm trying to decide on single or tandem axle. How do like the single axle trailer ?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bad Horsie,

My class C is rated to tow 5,000# with a max tongue weight of 500#. The trailer and bike fully loaded, with some misc camping gear in the trailer as well, weighs 2,220# with a tongue weight of 475#. {the trailer has a GVWR of 2,990 and being under 3K# does not have brakes} and a single will have more tongue weight than a double. My 6.8L V-10 {305 HP/420# torque} can pull {and stop} that all day and even in the serious mountains that we frequently drive it only impacts my mileage about one half of an mpg. Having a Class A tiffin {nice coach BTW}, power and payload should be nonissues for you.

As far as the old argument over single axle vs tandem there are a couple of things to consider. Tandem axle trailers are a little easier to back and park but this can be a function more of the distance between the ball and the axle as much as the presence of a second axle. With a single, there is far less tire scrubbing. I have had the trailer for almost a year now and it gets easier every trip. The tandem axle trailer will weigh and cost significantly more and being larger there may be storage issues to consider as well. I had a 30' slot in storage {$75 a month} so adding the 14' {overall trailer} allowed me to just move up to a 40' slot at an additional $15 a month.

Some folks prefer having 4 tires vs 2 but given that I take very good care of all of my tires this doesn't keep me awake nights. The two tires get checked regularly, have the proper psi for the load they carry {not the max psi on the sidewall which would be too much}. Naturally, I have a brand new spare and will be rotating the 3 tires at the one year anniversary which will probably be around 7 - 8,000 miles.

One feature that I really like is having 7' of headroom. This makes loading, unloading and just being in the trailer so much easier and since you will be pulling it behind a large coach there is no downside. E track now makes joist hangers for their system. This enabled me to place 2 X 6"'s across the front of the trailer and then I added 3/4" plywood shelving to the upper {a great spot to store helmets and other misc gear}. Below the 2 X 6" contains my BBQ, LP Cylinder, fire pit, etc gaining me valuable storage space.

Here is a shot of the interior of the trailer:

IMG_0194.JPG


Painting the dry wood interior was a lot like herding cats... it took nearly two gallons {about 4 coats}. Zoom in and you can see the shelving up forward which I highly recommend {with a single or a double axle}. Towing I use 4 heavy duty ratcheting tie-down straps each secured by its own D ring anchored by E Track {great stuff} with the suspension lightly loaded so the bike rides well. My Springfield at 862# is nearly as heavy as your RM, each strap goes to one of the 4 highway bars and I tow with the kickstand up and always in neutral. With the large rear ramp, loading/unloading could not be easier, simpler and above all safer.

Whatever you decide you will find having your own personal, secure garage everywhere you travel is priceless. Good luck and feel free to PM me with any questions.

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I think the Indian graphics kick it up a notch in the style department. :)
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OK, one last pic of the rig out on the Colorado River last January...

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:cool:
 

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If I can make a suggestion based on my experience, I would change the way you secure your bike. I too used the crash bars front and rear to secure my Roadmaster when trailering it and learned that was a mistake. I first discovered a missing bolt on the front left crash bar and while it was at the dealer for a service they discovered one of the bars was fractured at the lower weld. They asked how I was securing the bike and I said by the crash bars. They recommended I use the rear foot peg mounts and the front axle. I now run a soft strap between the front fender and fork pulling down on the front axle and use a soft strap on each of the rear foot peg brackets pulling forward. The bike is also in a WheelDock chock. No issues since!

I really enjoyed your article. I’ve ridden from Jerome down to Prescott and down to Yarnell. Beautiful ride with lots of twisties! I still want to do the Devils Highway too! Please post a ride report and pictures when you do the 191. Thanks, and safe riding!
 

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Captain Steve, do you have a drone? if not, get yourself a DJI mavic air and you will make movies of your trips very easily and from a viewpoint that is breathtaking. Thanks for sharing those great pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Black2016RMrider, thank for the tip and I can see why you made the adjustment. My 2017 Springfield, however, is set up differently. No pegs on my bike, driver, and passenger each have their own set of floorboards. Each of the passenger floorboards is secured to the bike by 2 large hex head bolts. The drivers {larger} floorboards utilize one large bolt and a long thinner bolt that serves as an axis connected at each end. The rear highway bars are also secured by 4 large hex head bolts {the same size as the floorboard bolts}. The forward bars are secured by two large bots at the top center and the lower ends have 3 large bolts as well. All in all the bars are far more robust than the floorboards. Methinks I am good to go with this system. ;)


When I finish tensioning all 4 ratchet straps the bike stands absolutely vertical with equal tension on each of the straps and all pulling the bike forward into the thru bolted wheel chock. I can grab the bike by the handlebar while standing at the side door and the trailer will rock but the bike remains vertical.

Jerome {after a big ole burger at Haunted hamburger of course...} over the pass and down to the Prescott Valley is one one of the finest sets of Twisties I have ever ridden.
Very similar to parts of the Devils Highway but the 666 just has a lot more miles to it. The campground we like at Big Lake on the north end of the DH doesn't open until mid-May as it is at 9,200'. But hope to get up there for a few days by the beginning of June. Like they say on TV... "Film at eleven."

I like the drone idea but am dangerously close to "one too many toys" lately and better not press my luck {but I will check it out on line}. I am also looking for a Go Pro or something similar that I can mount to the front of the bike. Suggestions???

I got the motorhome and trailer cleaned up and put back in storage this morning and now it's time to tackle a thorough cleaning of the Torque Monster as every bug in the Pueblo found the front end over the last few days {almost need to order another half gallon of Bugslide from Amazon}. Looks to be about a 3 beer job with lots of tunes {and a little more Cowbell}.

:)
 

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I like the drone idea but am dangerously close to "one too many toys" lately and better not press my luck {but I will check it out on line}. I am also looking for a Go Pro or something similar that I can mount to the front of the bike. Suggestions???


:)
I have been looking at this one Amazon.com : Insta360 ONE X 360 Action Camera, 5.7K Video and 18MP Photos, with Flowstate Stabilization, Real Time WiFi Transfer (SD Card Sold Independently, V30 MicroSDXC is Required) : Camera & Photo .

But just got that drone and is amazing. Look at this video shot with the Mavic air drone
. The drone will follow you up to 40 MPH

 
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