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Anyone ever get caught in an electrical storm with a lot of thunder and lightning?? I have,and on a number of occassions! On my way home from work one summers' night [I worked nights for 30 years and drove my bike to and from wrok every single day of those 30 years] and while traveling home on the highway,I encountered a real bad thunder storm and got struck by lightning which hit my antenna and actually blew the radio right out of the fairing.And I know of a couple other guys who also experienced similar strikes while on their bikes,but they were traveling across the plains in the south western part of this country.In all cases,the lightning hit the antennas.The fix for this [if anyone is interested] is to add a ground strap attached someplace on the frame so the lightning will go thru that and to the ground or road, instead of your electrical system.I even got hit one night coming home in my truck which actually melted the base of the antenna where it mounted on the fender,also taking out my radio.Duh!! So I added ground straps [cheap money] to that too which was suppose to cure the problem.After I added those straps,I never got caught in another electrical storm again.Double DUH!!! :(Go figure!!:rolleyes:
Damn!
 

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Here is just more evidence of the wussification of Steve Sidoti. I have been riding almost 40 years, over a quarter of a million miles, and have only ridden once in the rain. I know, I immediately lose my badass biker card because of that statement. But today, coming home from Cave Creek to my home in Gilbert Arizona, I hit a very hard rain for about 20 miles. It was so hard that my goggles were useless, so I had to take them off and duck down behind my windshield to try to see where I was going. I got behind another vehicle and kept a safe distance, but I just needed somebody to track the lanes for me. When I got home I talked to two of my Oriental friends about this. Wut Da Chit told me I was absolutely crazy for not checking the weather first. Ho Lee Phuc told me I was nuts for being out there among all of the Phoenix drivers who have no clue how to drive in the rain. I have to admit, it was very uncomfortable for me. So there you have it. I am a wuss.
Ive met ho lee phuc...he tends to talk to me.like that too
 

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I’ve rode in so much rain it ain’t funny. On my RM & my RK for over 45 yrs. good tires are key. Myself & a few close riding buddies have a saying if your worried about the rain you’ll never ride your bike. When it’s raining I’m usually going faster. I carry a full face helmet with me on any long trips just for rain days.
What tires do you recommend? I have the E 3’s like a lot of folks, and they seem to have a poor reputation for working well on slick roads. Seems like riders like the Metzeler ME888’s for rain and overall better performance.
 

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This little cloud put down snow, sleet, wind and rain. Couldn’t see chit and my zipper was open with sleet pouring in on my junk. I hate riding in the rain. Two weeks ago my wife and I both almost lost it trying to brake coming down the hill to our house due to the slick wet road.

I hate the rain for a lot of reasons.
 
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One fine late October I was heading to the National Indian/Jack Daniels ride. I put on rain gear in Seligman AZ (East of Kingman) and rode to Tucumcari NM in rain. Overnighted there, got up and it was still raining hard, rode to almost Oklahoma City in constant medium to hard rain. 800 miles of rain. Then east of Oklahoma City, I had to strip down to jeans and a t-shirt because it was in the high 90's.
 

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I'd argue you have both common sense and luck. I've been caught in rain plenty of times, and the only reason you have to do that is because you have to be somewhere by some time, or you have a climate where pop up showers are a thing. If you're the type that doesn't mind that ... you probablly have enough experience and gear to withstand that short rain sequence.

If you go out in complete washout conditions, thunderstorms, etc... you either Don't Fear the Reaper, or you could be the next contestant on The Biker Darwinism Show for sure.
I live in southwestern Michigan, I have a rule that I follow. If its not raining when I leave my house I ride. I have been in many more rain storms than I can count. I dont have a windshield but have raingear. Most of the time its not fun. But that is life. Even rode in a pop-up blizzard, not so fun either. Stay safe everyone.
 

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Ive met ho lee phuc...he tends to talk to me.like that too
I live in Washington state. Out here, if ya ain't ridin the rain ya ain't ridin much! I was out on my bike one day and stopped at a restaurant for a bite. As I was leaving, a guy approached me with his wife and kids in tow and asked if they could ask me some questions about riding motorcycles. His daughter asked me"What happens if when you start riding on a nice day and then it starts to rain? I mean, what do you do?"I let that question hang for a couple of seconds, looked her straight in the eye in the eye and said " I get wet! The whole restaurant busted up laughing. I ride in the rain so that I get used to dealing with it. After a while, it becomes a non issue. You automatically change up your riding style for the conditions that you' re riding in. I like to ride cross country. If I get caught in the rain, I don't stop at a cafe or hole up in a hotel, I ride through it.
 

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Here is just more evidence of the wussification of Steve Sidoti. I have been riding almost 40 years, over a quarter of a million miles, and have only ridden once in the rain. I know, I immediately lose my badass biker card because of that statement. But today, coming home from Cave Creek to my home in Gilbert Arizona, I hit a very hard rain for about 20 miles. It was so hard that my goggles were useless, so I had to take them off and duck down behind my windshield to try to see where I was going. I got behind another vehicle and kept a safe distance, but I just needed somebody to track the lanes for me. When I got home I talked to two of my Oriental friends about this. Wut Da Chit told me I was absolutely crazy for not checking the weather first. Ho Lee Phuc told me I was nuts for being out there among all of the Phoenix drivers who have no clue how to drive in the rain. I have to admit, it was very uncomfortable for me. So there you have it. I am a wuss.
Riding in the rain is inevitable if you're out eating up the miles. I don't like riding in the rain, but I don't hate it enough to avoid at all cost. The worst is when the rain turns into snow. If you think rain on the road is slippery, when it turns to snow its an other worldly pucker. And sometimes waiting it out is not an option. It just piles up more.
I’m old now and live in drier climes Napa valley and haven’t ridden in the rain in years. But when still in high school in NH I rode from my house in Chester to Salem to work at a Bradlees store (think Kmart) about a 45 minute ride and I literally can’t remember the amount of times I would leave home in nice weather an get part way there and wham rain. I rode a little Honda cl 350 scrambler back then and kept a pouch strapped on the back with a thin raincoat and a snap on bubble type face screen for my open face helmet which at speed kept the rain flowing off it well enough to see. But I would have to buy new dry pants and shirt before I could even start work. Which kind of negated that days pay. Now I ride a 2002 Indian scout and don’t have to ride in the rain
 

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I agree it is inevitable at some point riding in the Midwest, you are going to get caught in the rain. My brother and I were able to outrun this storm on July 11th for about 45 miles; however, it finally caught up with us and just prior to the rain, the skies turned as dark as predusk, the wind was like a mini tornado with dust swirling in a circular fashion, tree branches coming down followed by the sideways downpour with lightning and thunder occurring in rapid succession. Road through the red and yellow on the map where the blue dot is for about 20 miles. Had the flashers on and much to my surprise, the Chieftain handled very well under the less than desirable circumstances. It was definitely a memorable ride, not one that I would like to encounter again any time soon!!!!
IMG_5283.PNG
 

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Here is just more evidence of the wussification of Steve Sidoti. I have been riding almost 40 years, over a quarter of a million miles, and have only ridden once in the rain. I know, I immediately lose my badass biker card because of that statement. But today, coming home from Cave Creek to my home in Gilbert Arizona, I hit a very hard rain for about 20 miles. It was so hard that my goggles were useless, so I had to take them off and duck down behind my windshield to try to see where I was going. I got behind another vehicle and kept a safe distance, but I just needed somebody to track the lanes for me. When I got home I talked to two of my Oriental friends about this. Wut Da Chit told me I was absolutely crazy for not checking the weather first. Ho Lee Phuc told me I was nuts for being out there among all of the Phoenix drivers who have no clue how to drive in the rain. I have to admit, it was very uncomfortable for me. So there you have it. I am a wuss.
I’ve been riding since 1968, I’ve lost count how many times I’ve got caught in the rain and some snow, if it’s too bad just pullover for a few minutes, stay relaxed while driving,face and windshields help a ton, stay away from the center of the road due to motor oil coming up from the road. You’ll be ok.
 

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Experience is a GREAT TEACHER.Like anything else,the first time ya get stuck in foul weather is always the hardest and a learning process.But once you've been thru it,you then know what to expect,hence taking precautions to adjust for those conditions.Have ya ever driven thru a snow storm,ice storm,or a hurricane?? I have!!! And I learned a lot,hence the reason I'm still here and STILL runnin two wheeler.And besides,as I've said before,I do NOT wanna make the wife HAPPY!!! lol lol Dave!!!
 

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I hit several showers on this trip, presently in Wilmington NC. Leaving Sat. AM to head back to Wyoming. I’m sure to hit a few more. It’s pretty hot and steamy. IMO a little rain on a hot day is a good thing but down here in the humidity I don’t dry out very fast. A few years ago I rode in steady rain and some snow from Prince George BC to Banf Ab hitting some wet snow right around the Columbia Ice Fields in Jasper NP. Heated gear and a rain suit all the way.
 

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What tires do you recommend? I have the E 3’s like a lot of folks, and they seem to have a poor reputation for working well on slick roads. Seems like riders like the Metzeler ME888’s for rain and overall better performance.
Here's my two shekels... When it first starts raining, all tires are going to feel a little greasy. That's not the tires, it's the surface. When rain first starts, the oils and grease in the street start to activate and until they wash away, it can be a little dicey. As for the rubber, I have ridden a couple thousand miles on E3s on three different bikes and never had an issue. Have E4s on my Cross with about 5-8K of rain and no issue. Have Avon Cobra Chromes on my RM and Vintage with about 10K of rain and no issues. To me, there really isn't a difference in performance when it's wet. They all channel water and they all stay on the ground. For me the biggest key is proper inflation and not running the tires past the wear bars. If they get that low, you run the risk of hydroplaning in the rain and that's no bueno for a motorcycle.
 

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Here's my two shekels... When it first starts raining, all tires are going to feel a little greasy. That's not the tires, it's the surface. When rain first starts, the oils and grease in the street start to activate and until they wash away, it can be a little dicey. As for the rubber, I have ridden a couple thousand miles on E3s on three different bikes and never had an issue. Have E4s on my Cross with about 5-8K of rain and no issue. Have Avon Cobra Chromes on my RM and Vintage with about 10K of rain and no issues. To me, there really isn't a difference in performance when it's wet. They all channel water and they all stay on the ground. For me the biggest key is proper inflation and not running the tires past the wear bars. If they get that low, you run the risk of hydroplaning in the rain and that's no bueno for a motorcycle.
I run Michelin Commander 2's on all of my previous bikes and they had great traction in wet conditions. I bought a 2019 Indian Roadmaster last year and have yet to wear out the stock tires. They now have Michelin Commander 3's made specifically for touring bikes. I'm going to get a set of those when I need new tires. They are getting great reviews from the folks that run them.
 

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The first day of my basic rider course was the rainiest day in Denver in more then a year. So at least I got that out of the way!
Similar story, only it was the second day of our MSF course that was cloudy. Most everyone finished their test on dry pavement. There were only 2 of us left when the sky OPENED! I looked at the other guy, then we both looked at the instructor, who rolled his arm in a circle - let's go! We both did perfect, but they took points off because we went "slower than average". I thought we should have received extra points for the waves of water sheeting across the lot. But, it gave me confidence, that the bikes can do the tight turns and figure eights, albeit slower.
 
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Here is just more evidence of the wussification of Steve Sidoti. I have been riding almost 40 years, over a quarter of a million miles, and have only ridden once in the rain. I know, I immediately lose my badass biker card because of that statement. But today, coming home from Cave Creek to my home in Gilbert Arizona, I hit a very hard rain for about 20 miles. It was so hard that my goggles were useless, so I had to take them off and duck down behind my windshield to try to see where I was going. I got behind another vehicle and kept a safe distance, but I just needed somebody to track the lanes for me. When I got home I talked to two of my Oriental friends about this. Wut Da Chit told me I was absolutely crazy for not checking the weather first. Ho Lee Phuc told me I was nuts for being out there among all of the Phoenix drivers who have no clue how to drive in the rain. I have to admit, it was very uncomfortable for me. So there you have it. I am a wuss.
 

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here in Europe we used to say among bikers: there is no bad weather, but bad gear. On longer tours you have to be prepared for rain depending on the area you're driving. I spent some thousand km's in rain. With right gear and tyre and a cautious behavior it's not too bad, at all. What is hard is to leave home while it's raining, but apart from that - no issue. Sure, riding in sunshine has no real alternative - at least for heavy bikes.
I even experience snow 2 times on passes in the Alps. That really is no fun at all. I was very lucky that I managed not to fall...
 
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