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They look great. What is the advantage of installing them? Do they help protect the bags more?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They look great. What is the advantage of installing them? Do they help protect the bags more?
Honestly I don't know. I have read in other parts of the forum where people are applying collars around the bars for added clearance. My thoughts are the added clearance is only available at the collars. Why not just add the spacers and have the 1/2 inch the entire bar.
 

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Honestly I don't know. I have read in other parts of the forum where people are applying collars around the bars for added clearance. My thoughts are the added clearance is only available at the collars. Why not just add the spacers and have the 1/2 inch the entire bar.
The issue with the rear bag guards is that, in the event of a tip-over (think parking lot speed or less), the trailing edge of the bag will still contact the ground. The shaft collars give an extra 1/4 inch of clearance which, from the photos in that thread, will keep the bag from contacting the ground. By moving the entire crash guard out by 1/2 inch, you avoid having to add the shaft collars (which, IMO don't really look all that great, they are definitely function over form). Hopefully, OP will lay the bike on it's side (CAREFULLY, with cardboard or something under the guards, NOT wishing any harm to OP!!!) and see if moving the guards out actually keeps the bags off the ground.
 

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Nice work, and something that fills a need.

Just a heads-up:
Perhaps they've changed grinding wheel specs these days but I was taught eons ago not to use one for non-ferrous metals, especially Al and alloys. It clogs up the surface of the wheel and when loaded up enough can heat up and crack the wheel, sometimes causing it to explode. Doing small runs is generally not a problem but if you are intent on making and selling these in any number you might need to chase up the specs of your wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Nice work, and something that fills a need.

Just a heads-up:
Perhaps they've changed grinding wheel specs these days but I was taught eons ago not to use one for non-ferrous metals, especially Al and alloys. It clogs up the surface of the wheel and when loaded up enough can heat up and crack the wheel, sometimes causing it to explode. Doing small runs is generally not a problem but if you are intent on making and selling these in any number you might need to chase up the specs of your wheel.
Thanks for the info. My dad also brought this up. I have no intent on making and selling them. I would have to take them back of my bike to trace them out again. Much rather ride than work.
 

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Did ANYONE go the next step and actually market bar spacers? Looks like a perfect Chinese thing if no one in the states went forward with this great idea.
 

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Nice work, and something that fills a need.

Just a heads-up:
Perhaps they've changed grinding wheel specs these days but I was taught eons ago not to use one for non-ferrous metals, especially Al and alloys. It clogs up the surface of the wheel and when loaded up enough can heat up and crack the wheel, sometimes causing it to explode. Doing small runs is generally not a problem but if you are intent on making and selling these in any number you might need to chase up the specs of your wheel.
A small belt sander is the ticket for shaping aluminum pieces.
 

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if I was to market the stuff I come up with I wonder if its worth it.....like a custom longer all aluminium shift peg. hhmmmmm. as far as those spacers go I can make those quite easily and I think 3/4 of an inch thick would be better, might make a set and see.
 
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