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I’m a new rider and unfortunately laid my Scout down today on its right side. The rear brake pedal seems to have come fully disconnected from where it sits in the ABS fluid reservoir. Can anyone recommend how I can fix this on my own or if I need to take it to the shop? Thanks in advance.
 

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Unless you are mechanically inclined [judging from you're post,you're not] then I would bring the machine to a shop or dealership to get em repaired "professionally"! Why?? Cause you are"infact" talking brakes here!! And the last thing ya want, is to need em, and they don't work properly.But then again,ya don't wanna make the wife happy now,do ya?? Or do ya!!! lol lol But that's just my opinion FWIW!!
 

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It might not be as bad as it seems. I dropped my Scout on the right side and the brake pedal did what you describe. It was an easy fix but you need to be confident and have experience working on the bike. Here's how it works.

599903


The pedal is linked to the push-rod, #1.
That pushes the piston assembly #10. The rod has a domed end and sits in a cup in the piston.
Take note of the parts of that assembly, the spring, the piston, two seals, a washer, and a circlip. It's the circlip that holds the whole assembly into the cylinder.
The push-rod is held into the piston by the washer. The washer sits behind the dome portion and prevents the rod from withdrawing too far.

When you dropped the bike the pedal was forced upwards and it pulled the push-rod back through the washer. It can be pushed back in place and everything will work as before. But you have a compromised washer and it needs to be replaced. Even though it works, it can easily be pulled out again.

Undo the lever from the push-rod and take the adjuster nut off. Remove the master cylinder from the bike. Don't open the lid and don't undo any hoses. You don't want to see any brake fluid in this procedure.

If you hold it with the piston pointing upwards you can remove the circlip - the spring will not push the piston too far out and you don't remove the piston assembly. It's maintaining the fluid seal. Treat it carefully.

Remove the washer. You will see that it's been deformed as the push-rod came out. Find a stainless washer the same size and put it over the pushrod. Put it back into the rear of the piston, hold it in place (it needs a push) and replace the circlip.

Bolt the master cylinder to the bike and fit the rubber boot. Attach the adjuster and lever to the push-rod, making sure to adjust it for proper movement as before. If you have been careful with the piston you won't need to bleed the brakes - notoriously difficult on an ABS Scout and is a dealer only task.

If you are not confident you can do the work, get somebody else to do it. Working on brakes needs care. It was less than an hour for me to fix mine, which should give you an idea of what a bike shop will charge to do it for you.
 

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To add to the above, you will need snap-ring pliers to remove and replace the snap-ring (circlip). DO NOT REUSE THE SNAP RING! Once they get bent or deformed, it is nearly impossible to straighten them out.
 

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One thing I missed is the cost of parts from an Indian dealer. The parts chart shows the piston assembly #10 as a single part. A dealer probably won't replace the washer with a generic washer, but will replace that whole assembly. That will add to the cost. And then they will need to bleed the brakes, probably another cost for that.
 
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