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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got kinda tired of the fading and re-dyeing on my 2014 Vinnie........started to look like a sort of baby crap green, so I remembered having read somewhere about using a two parts Saddle Tan and one part Brown combination. Went to Tandy's, bought the juice, mixed it up and slathered it on. Pretty thick because I wanted it to last a while. When I was done I thought I had overshot the mark.

I put all the leather back on the bike and LOVED it! It's right for the bike's black and red two-tone and the copper leaf warbonnet on the tank.

New Dyed Leather.jpg
 

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I love it as well, very rich, beautiful color. As you said, it goes well with the paint too.
 

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I added Fiebings Clear Finish(Top Kote) when I re-dyed one. Made it a bit more shiny but bet it lasts longer too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The prep was nothing cosmic.........wiped it with a slightly damp cloth then followed with the Indian cleaner from the standard kit. Dye is Fiebings Pro Dye, 2 parts Saddle Tan and 1 part Dark Brown. Finish was Fiebings Aussie Leather Conditioner. Time will tell the "leather weather" story, but I've seen no sign of fade in the three months since I dyed it all.
 

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can you change tan to black? I have arm rests that i want to change to match the new bike....but a new set is only $75.00
 

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can you change tan to black? I have arm rests that i want to change to match the new bike....but a new set is only $75.00
Yes you can dye them black but you could sell them on here and buy some black ones
 
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The prep was nothing cosmic.........wiped it with a slightly damp cloth then followed with the Indian cleaner from the standard kit. Dye is Fiebings Pro Dye, 2 parts Saddle Tan and 1 part Dark Brown. Finish was Fiebings Aussie Leather Conditioner. Time will tell the "leather weather" story, but I've seen no sign of fade in the three months since I dyed it all.
Looks goo don your bike.

I would suggest to anyone that they thoroughly scrub-clean the leather with acetone prior to a dye job. The '14 leather (assume that's what we're talking about here) has a waxy coating on it that is part of the distressing process. The more of that you get off, the more "tooth" you create for the dye and the longer it will last and the more uniform it will be.
 

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The prep was nothing cosmic.........wiped it with a slightly damp cloth then followed with the Indian cleaner from the standard kit. Dye is Fiebings Pro Dye, 2 parts Saddle Tan and 1 part Dark Brown. Finish was Fiebings Aussie Leather Conditioner. Time will tell the "leather weather" story, but I've seen no sign of fade in the three months since I dyed it all.
The trick to getting leather dye to last is to use the deglazer first, then apply dye as soon as the deglazer dries. The Indian "cleaner" is useless, may as well use Windex. The deglazer is pretty much just acetone, which will pull moisture out of the leather, making it really "thirsty" and the dye soaks in deeper.

You should then top it off with resolene after the dye has had some time to dry. Conditioner goes in after the resolene, but isn't really neded.
 

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Looks goo don your bike.

I would suggest to anyone that they thoroughly scrub-clean the leather with acetone prior to a dye job. The '14 leather (assume that's what we're talking about here) has a waxy coating on it that is part of the distressing process. The more of that you get off, the more "tooth" you create for the dye and the longer it will last and the more uniform it will be.
Yes! The acetone will remove any coatings as well as remove moisture making the leather suck in the dye like a sponge.
 

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Love it. Distressed leather look is so much better than the factory desert tan. Needs some matching fringed floorboards - imho.

For those attempting this, Fiebings also has matte finishes if you don't like the glossy finish (I like the gloss). I prefer Dark Mahogony die. It has a reddish brown color to it that makes a great distressed leather color. Don't be afraid to ask some questions if you have a Tandy leather store nearby - most of the people there are quite helpful. Get you some wool daubers from Amazon or Hobby Lobby for applying the dye. The hardest part of the project is the prep - make sure you do a thorough job.

Vets: If you are considering buying stuff from Tandy. Get a membership - it is free for veterans - details on their web site. All that they need is a photo copy of proof of status. This could save you 20% or more.
 

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First of all, wow; I love the look you guys have achieved! Nice!

I do a fair bit of leather work. I haven't done motorcycle accessories yet, but I've redyed steering wheels, and taken countless projects from flat leather to formed holsters, belts, etc.

I'd start with acetone or another deglazer, as others have suggested. Then dye to the color you want. Then you have a choice. I'd go with the Fiebings spray followed by some waterproofer like you use for shoes or camping gear. Or, if you don't want glossy, you can use the bottled liquid finishers, which can be matte or intermediate. But be aware, those will lighten the color a bit. That's why I always use the Fiebings spray on anything dyed black. After using the liquid finish and letting it dry, I'd still end with some waterproofing spray.

One more thing about dye; hand dyed leather like this is very superficially colored. The color is in a thin top layer of the leather. Do not attempt to get color further into the leather by globbing on huge amounts. I live in the high desert; about the dryest part of the country aside from Death Valley. Even here, where the usual drying times on leather products and in leather books can be cut to 25%, if you put too much dye on, it will take FAR longer to truly dry than you'd think. If you put the finish on while it's still drying, you'll end up with an uneven, patchy mess. So use just enough dye to get an even coloration, and then wait however long the instructions say (unless you're in the four corners states) plus a bit to be sure the dye is dry. Then put on the finish, wait again, and finally the waterproofer.
 

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Couple of examples of the work the above advice is based on:





 
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