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How about some feedback on handling under spirited conditions? I'm not going to road race the thing, but I'm sure there must be some of you who have pushed your bike in the twisties, after all, we are riders.

Is the front end too soft? Brake dive? Any bad habits? Anybody hit a pothole heeled over? Scraped a peg? Slid the rear?
 

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How about some feedback on handling under spirited conditions? I'm not going to road race the thing, but I'm sure there must be some of you who have pushed your bike in the twisties, after all, we are riders.

Is the front end too soft? Brake dive? Any bad habits? Anybody hit a pothole heeled over? Scraped a peg? Slid the rear?
Both the front and rear suspension are lacking. She actually turns well, but a damper might help handling too. Pegs are too long, especially the left one... Rear is nice and planted. She's not great on gravel, tires should help that.
 

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Could use Improvements to be sure as Meggie said .. But out The Door Bone stock It handles Damn Good .. Front is too soft Rear is a Bit Spongy .. But bought many Bikes that were far more lacking to begin with ..
 

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Only been riding a couple years so I don't have the experience that many of you have, so pardon my question.
Are subjects like suspension, tires etc. a mater of personal taste, or can the riding community reach a general consensus that something like suspension, handling, tires are worth praise or not. I also realize that just about any component can be upgraded from OEM but I'm mainly interested in safety and performance.
I've learned much from this forum, thanks y'all.
 

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To be honest, all " improvements " are rider subjective. There are just too many varitables in riding style, riders height, weight, experience etc to to reach a general consensus on any one component. For my money, I always start with tires. That small patch of rubber connecting the bike to the road is often overlooked, but to my way of thinking, the most important item of all. I have seen riders pour money into engines, suspensions & go fast parts, then slap on a basic tire, essenially setting themselves up for diasaster. Havn' been lucky enough to get my bike yet, but that will be one the first item I check out. I use to run Michelin radials on the Goldwing and they made a huge difference in it's handling. Not sure what come on the Scout, whether it is Bias or Radial belted. I am looking to upgrade to the Michelin Commander II when the time comes...
 

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Everyone has an opinion, and if you want 10 opinions from 8 riders, go on a forum and ask about suspension, tires, brakes, oil, oil filters, air filter and just about every component in the bike.

The Scout is very good out of the crate for its intended use for the average rider. Let's assume the purpose is leisurely crusing, one up, 180lb. For that set of conditions, the bike is fine. Even great. If you're pushing the bike (defined as more spirited acceleration and deceleration and faster turns), the first thing you'll notice is that it's not as stable as before. The thing will bounce more, the front will dive when you brake, will feel light when you accelerate, and most importantly you'll have to work hard to keep your intended line on fast turns. In extreme situations, the rear will break loose (slide) and the front will shake violently ('head shake').

The Scout's geometry is less than ideal for that type of riding, but a good suspension, front and back will fix it. If you go with adjustable forks and shocks, a good shop can really tune it for your riding style and weight. That's not at all controversial. Where you'll get into arguments is which brand to pick, which model, and how to have it adjusted. No one will tell you that the suspension on any entry-price bike is good. Only KTMs come with excellent suspension, the rest is meh until you get to the $20k+ bikes.

Tires. The biggest issue of tires is grip, especially in wet conditions. I don't know how ours behaves, the tread pattern looks fine. Cold weather riding, wet roads, spirited riding, all complicating factors. Let's get some miles out of her and decide.

My advice is leaving things alone for now. A few thousands miles, revisit the issue unless as you ride you notice the bike is not as stable as you wish it to be. In a few months there will be plenty of options for replacement shocks and fork inserts and I am certain others here on the forum will come to some sort of consensus about what works and what doesn't.
 

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In extreme situations, the rear will break loose (slide) and the front will shake violently ('head shake')..
Ahhh, triggers memories of my old Kawi H2! Would pitch you off on all but the smoothest tracks if you let it have its way with you. Dual steering dampers would not even tame it's cold, green soul.

Thanks for the read on the Scout's handling! Looking forward to wringing it out if it ever shows.
 

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As far as handling goes, how would you guys rate it against other bikes in the cruiser/standard classes? Comparable bikes besides the sportster?
 

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Everyone has an opinion, and if you want 10 opinions from 8 riders, go on a forum and ask about suspension, tires, brakes, oil, oil filters, air filter and just about every component in the bike.

The Scout is very good out of the crate for its intended use for the average rider. Let's assume the purpose is leisurely crusing, one up, 180lb. For that set of conditions, the bike is fine. Even great. If you're pushing the bike (defined as more spirited acceleration and deceleration and faster turns), the first thing you'll notice is that it's not as stable as before. The thing will bounce more, the front will dive when you brake, will feel light when you accelerate, and most importantly you'll have to work hard to keep your intended line on fast turns. In extreme situations, the rear will break loose (slide) and the front will shake violently ('head shake').

The Scout's geometry is less than ideal for that type of riding, but a good suspension, front and back will fix it. If you go with adjustable forks and shocks, a good shop can really tune it for your riding style and weight. That's not at all controversial. Where you'll get into arguments is which brand to pick, which model, and how to have it adjusted. No one will tell you that the suspension on any entry-price bike is good. Only KTMs come with excellent suspension, the rest is meh until you get to the $20k+ bikes.

Tires. The biggest issue of tires is grip, especially in wet conditions. I don't know how ours behaves, the tread pattern looks fine. Cold weather riding, wet roads, spirited riding, all complicating factors. Let's get some miles out of her and decide.

My advice is leaving things alone for now. A few thousands miles, revisit the issue unless as you ride you notice the bike is not as stable as you wish it to be. In a few months there will be plenty of options for replacement shocks and fork inserts and I am certain others here on the forum will come to some sort of consensus about what works and what doesn't.
You described my riding style and weight, scarey. Very helpful, sensible advice that I can and will be listening to as the miles add up. thank you all again for the help.
 

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As far as handling goes, how would you guys rate it against other bikes in the cruiser/standard classes? Comparable bikes besides the sportster?
You will be needing others besides me to do any comparing up as Basically a Harley Owner Most my life but will give my latest 2 options .. I think the Scout handles very well but feel a little more secure slamming into the curves with my Victory Cross Country for a Bike it's size the handling actually shocked me after first bought it .. The FXR4 was another one that would be a very close match for it but I had upgraded the Suspension on it, so will give the Scout the edge to that one Stock for Stock .. As Far as any other model HD the Scout just blows their doors off with the exception of the Dyna FXDX which had Adjustable Suspension ..
 

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Everyone has an opinion, and if you want 10 opinions from 8 riders, go on a forum and ask about suspension, tires, brakes, oil, oil filters, air filter and just about every component in the bike.

The Scout is very good out of the crate for its intended use for the average rider. Let's assume the purpose is leisurely crusing, one up, 180lb. For that set of conditions, the bike is fine. Even great. If you're pushing the bike (defined as more spirited acceleration and deceleration and faster turns), the first thing you'll notice is that it's not as stable as before. The thing will bounce more, the front will dive when you brake, will feel light when you accelerate, and most importantly you'll have to work hard to keep your intended line on fast turns. In extreme situations, the rear will break loose (slide) and the front will shake violently ('head shake').

The Scout's geometry is less than ideal for that type of riding, but a good suspension, front and back will fix it. If you go with adjustable forks and shocks, a good shop can really tune it for your riding style and weight. That's not at all controversial. Where you'll get into arguments is which brand to pick, which model, and how to have it adjusted. No one will tell you that the suspension on any entry-price bike is good. Only KTMs come with excellent suspension, the rest is meh until you get to the $20k+ bikes.

Tires. The biggest issue of tires is grip, especially in wet conditions. I don't know how ours behaves, the tread pattern looks fine. Cold weather riding, wet roads, spirited riding, all complicating factors. Let's get some miles out of her and decide.

My advice is leaving things alone for now. A few thousands miles, revisit the issue unless as you ride you notice the bike is not as stable as you wish it to be. In a few months there will be plenty of options for replacement shocks and fork inserts and I am certain others here on the forum will come to some sort of consensus about what works and what doesn't.
That was good solid advice Meggie!
 

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I haven't run out of gas yet... so I haven't had to push it yet. ;)
I have, which is why I jumped on topic.

As far as comparisons - none of the bikes ever owned remained with its stock suspension more than 600-800 miles, and this one won't either. For us at least, two things change asap on every single bike: suspension and exhaust.
 

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I'll probably be putzing with my suspension this year, but like many say, I want to put some miles on it stock to get a feeling. With the bike being pretty basic, I think suspension companies might step up sooner than later. While not being cutting edge, Progressive items will be an improvement over stock and not break the bank. Having a load rating of 430#, this could be beneficial for many, especially two up riders. Honestly, my experience has only been with Progressive and Race Tech, and they have both worked well for me. I've found Progressive to be more plush with improved handling and Race Tech to be more responsive at the expense of plushness. Plus, I'm too cheap to spend $600+ on any of my 100% pure street bikes :). That said, my thoughts:

Front: I'll likely lift up the front tire, pop off the fork cap and remove the top washer. I'll take the washer to my local hardware store, match it up and buy a few extra for each fork leg. No more than a .5" worth for each leg. This might stiffen it up a touch and reduce brake dive without making it top out too quick. Plus, easily adjustable by reducing washers. This will cost you 1/2 hour of time and $2 ? Personally, I liked progressive wound springs on my cruising type bikes (Progressive) and straight wound springs (Race Tech) more beneficial on my past sport bikes. Straight wound springs require more fiddling to get them right.

Rear: The stock shocks are 11.5" in length eyelet/eyelet unladen. I believe Meggie already confirmed some Progressive 412 shocks would work regarding shock diameter. I'm thinking a 12" Progressive shock in either 444/430 variant designed for the H-D Sportster. The Sportster is within 15# weight of the shock so internal valving/spring rates should be plenty close enough The extra 1/2" length "might" quicken front steering a bit but likely no noticeable difference. The Scout shocks mount with a 12mm bolt while the Sportster uses a 1/2" bolt, so tightening up the fit in the bushing should be pretty simple being off only .5mm

Tires: I have no idea how well/long the stock Kenda will perform, but thanks to similar size to the H-D 48, alternate tire choices are available. Finding a sportier 150/80-16 rear tire isn't hard but it is for a 130/90-16 front. Pirelli/Dunlop have sport touring tires for the rear (Sport Dragon/BT45). Matching front/rear brands available are Dunlop Elite 3, Metzeler ME888 and Pirelli Night Dragon). Wide white walls front and rear? Metz ME888 and Dunlop Cruiser Max :)
 
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It's been said. The scout is limited by suspension and ground clearance. However, I find it far more capable than most cruisers. I'm 300 miles in and very happy with the performance.
 

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To be honest, all " improvements " are rider subjective. There are just too many varitables in riding style, riders height, weight, experience etc to to reach a general consensus on any one component. For my money, I always start with tires. That small patch of rubber connecting the bike to the road is often overlooked, but to my way of thinking, the most important item of all. I have seen riders pour money into engines, suspensions & go fast parts, then slap on a basic tire, essenially setting themselves up for diasaster. Havn' been lucky enough to get my bike yet, but that will be one the first item I check out. I use to run Michelin radials on the Goldwing and they made a huge difference in it's handling. Not sure what come on the Scout, whether it is Bias or Radial belted. I am looking to upgrade to the Michelin Commander II when the time comes...
I dont own a pennies worth of stock in this company, but I will add this suggestion. Check out Continental Tyres if they make the sizes required by the scout. I have been a fan of their rubber since the 1980s and have not owned a pair that did not improve the handling of whatever they went on Car, Truck or motorcycle. Conti's new compounds are truly remarkable and as you stated Luft that rubber is the only patch connecting you, motorcycle and everything else to the road. Shocks and Forks and Springs may improve the contact patch, but compound and tread are what make any adjustment worth tackling.
 

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I'm not sure many riders can judge handling. Most think that touring bikes are dogs but I know for fact you can push them much farther than most do. Is that going to be any different for the Scout? Maybe a little but I'd still bet many issues would be rider after some rather minor changes. Like heavier fork oil or springs, heavier rear shock or adjusted if it has it and a softer compound tire. From there on the only thing I see getting in the way would be frame flex and rider.
 
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