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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I want to start this by thanking all those who have posted on the exhaust plug removal. It has assisted in building my confidence in doing mine.

My company notified me that I have way too many vacation hours on the books, so from 12/22 through 1/5, I will be at home tinkering with my Chieftain as well as working my way through the honey-do list that has been growing for the past year.

Since moving into this home, I have lost much of my work area in the garage. My children have pilfered the majority of my tools so I will have to be somewhat creative during the plug removal. I have assembled the following:

1. 5 lb (2.27kg) mallet
2. 36" long, 1/2" (91.44cm long, 1.27cm ) pipe to use to knock out the plugs.
3. Floor flange to screw onto the iron pipe to give me a flat surface to hit.
4. 2 bricks to support the pipe
5. 2.5" (6.35cm) foam rubber form with hole cut through to protect the pipe from the bricks.
6. A fresh pack of cigarettes (optional)
7. A pot of coffee to keep the brain straight. (Other liquids may be substituted but I can't promise brain clarity for some available liquids. )

Removal of the saddlebag could not be easier. Removed the panel hiding the power distribution for the bag was simply wiggling it free and removing it. Pulled the plug, flipped the two bag clamps and removed the bag. The hardest part was not letting the bag slip from my old arthritic hands when I moved it a safe distance from the bike. Getting old sucks!

Pipe Removal. You need a 15mm, a 13mm, and I believe a 8mm socket to loosen up everything. The antenna must be removed to get to all the bolts holding the pipe in place. Removing the pipe on a one year old bike is a screaming pain in the butt. I blocked the rear tire with a brick and started pulling and wiggling until the pipe finally came loose. It took me roughly 20 minutes per side. After getting the pipe free, I placed it on my bricks and foam rubber abortion and with my mallet...started beating the devil out of my floor flange with the pipe going in from the back side of the pipe. This is fairly obvious since you have a slash cut pipe. About the sixth hit, I felt the plug start to give. Two or three more hits and the iron pipe hit the floor. The plug broke loose from two sides and bent over. No way to get it out...so there it will sit. I repeated the knock out process for the other side and had the same results.

Pipe installation. After cleaning up the pipes with alcohol , I sprayed the header pipe and coated the inside pipe with WD40 (silicone lubricant). This let the pipe slip back on easily. Bolted everything in place, cleaned the pipes a second time, and put away my tools.

The test. Backed the bike out of the garage...pressed the power button and hit the starter. First impression was a bit disappointing. It was only slightly louder however it did have a lower, gutsier tone. I let my Chieftain warm properly and took her our for a spin. The first thing I noticed is the bike has much more grunt than before. You can definitely hear the pipes now when you wind her up. I don't think she is as loud as stage one pipes but I believe I get all the benefits of a straight pipe without the $1K investment.

Overall opinion....I am pleased.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
 

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Gotta occupy your time.. What else can you do that won't cost anything. I am off work too for the same time. Problem is, my bike is in storage at my nephews place 20 miles away. Oh well guess I will save some money ( for now)
 

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All I did to remove the plugs in my stock exhaust
1 remove muffler
2 stand on end ( front end down on block of wood )
3 slam a long crow bar down muffler and knock out plugs ( the weight of the crow bar ought to do it )
4 use a magnet to remove plugs
5 reinstall mufflers
It's not that hard, crow bar knocks out one weld at a time, less stress on muffler, if you have a Chief or vintage you can flip pipes one side to the other and the slash cut will match angle of rear fender......
 

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I think I like the looks of that, Chief. I`m gonna try it.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
No adjustment needed on engine?
None that I feel is necessary. Talked to an Indian wrench and was told he has not seen any need on any of the bikes with punched plugs. He said going to the S&S air cleaner or Stage 1 pipes is a different story.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
 

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I want to start this by thanking all those who have posted on the exhaust plug removal. It has assisted in building my confidence in doing mine.

My company notified me that I have way too many vacation hours on the books, so from 12/22 through 1/5, I will be at home tinkering with my Chieftain as well as working my way through the honey-do list that has been growing for the past year.

Since moving into this home, I have lost much of my work area in the garage. My children have pilfered the majority of my tools so I will have to be somewhat creative during the plug removal. I have assembled the following:

1. 5 lb (2.27kg) mallet
2. 36" long, 1/2" (91.44cm long, 1.27cm ) pipe to use to knock out the plugs.
3. Floor flange to screw onto the iron pipe to give me a flat surface to hit.
3. 2 bricks to support the pipe
4. 2.5" (6.35cm) foam rubber form with hole cut through to protect the pipe from the bricks.
5. A fresh pack of cigarettes (optional)
6. A pot of coffee to keep the brain straight. (Other liquids may be substituted but I can't promise brain clarity for some available liquids. )

Removal of the saddlebag could not be easier. Removed the panel hiding the power distribution for the bag was simply wiggling it free and removing it. Pulled the plug, flipped the two bag clamps and removed the bag. The hardest part was not letting the bag slip from my old arthritic hands when I moved it a safe distance from the bike. Getting old sucks!

Pipe Removal. You need a 15mm, a 13mm, and I believe a 8mm socket to loosen up everything. The antenna must be removed to get to all the bolts holding the pipe in place. Removing the pipe on a one year old bike is a screaming pain in the butt. I blocked the rear tire with a brick and started pulling and wiggling until the pipe finally came loose. It took me roughly 20 minutes per side. After getting the pipe free, I placed it on my bricks and foam rubber abortion and with my mallet...started beating the devil out of my floor flange with the pipe going in from the back side of the pipe. This is fairly obvious since you have a slash cut pipe. About the sixth hit, I felt the plug start to give. Two or three more hits and the iron pipe hit the floor. The plug broke loose from two sides and bent over. No way to get it out...so there it will sit. I repeated the knock out process for the other side and had the same results.

Pipe installation. After cleaning up the pipes with alcohol , I sprayed the header pipe and coated the inside pipe with WD40 (silicone lubricant). This let the pipe slip back on easily. Bolted everything in place, cleaned the pipes a second time, and put away my tools.

The test. Backed the bike out of the garage...pressed the power button and hit the starter. First impression was a bit disappointing. It was only slightly louder however it did have a lower, gutsier tone. I let my Chieftain warm properly and took her our for a spin. The first thing I noticed is the bike has much more grunt than before. You can definitely hear the pipes now when you wind her up. I don't think she is as loud as stage one pipes but I believe I get all the benefits of a straight pipe without the $1K investment.

Overall opinion....I am pleased.

Semper Fi,
DrZ

1st one was a bugger like you say, then I realized I needed to open up the split end of the pipes at the header end, so I just torqued the other one hard out to the side, till it opened up that split a bit and whala the pipe came right off. When you reinstall it, the clamp, closes that split back up no problem.
 

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I knocked out the plugs on my Vintage... Probably took an hour all up.

Contrary to Drz's experience, the sound out of the unplugged pipes is significantly louder than stock. I now get a decent throaty throb at idle, and a real solid rumble on acceleration. I also get a quite amazing effect on deceleration... It's hard to describe,,, it's a sort of loud flatulance.

I also got an 8% reduction in fuel usage.

Before I did the plug removal I spoke to an Indian mechanic who said the engine management system would automatically compensate for the change in exhaust pressure.

It was the best $1000 I never spent!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I knocked out the plugs on my Vintage... Probably took an hour all up.

Contrary to Drz's experience, the sound out of the unplugged pipes is significantly louder than stock. I now get a decent throaty throb at idle, and a real solid rumble on acceleration. I also get a quite amazing effect on deceleration... It's hard to describe,,, it's a sort of loud flatulance.

I also got an 8% reduction in fuel usage.

Before I did the plug removal I spoke to an Indian mechanic who said the engine management system would automatically compensate for the change in exhaust pressure.

It was the best $1000 I never spent!!!!!!!!
Last evening, when my wife returned from work, I was tinkering with my Chieftain. When I started it, she asked..."OK...what did you do to it. It is much louder than before." I guess my hearing is much worse than I thought. I am looking forward to the 8% improvement in fuel economy...if I can quit accelerating like an idiot!

Semper Fi,
DrZ
 

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None that I feel is necessary. Talked to an Indian wrench and was told he has not seen any need on any of the bikes with punched plugs. He said going to the S&S air cleaner or Stage 1 pipes is a different story.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
Generally speaking if you modify the air intake you have to do a reflash. If not you can get away with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
According to the wrench I spoke with...a minor modification of the pipes require no flash. Changing the air intake to Dirty Bird's Stampede Series Arrowhead Air Cleaner, which is a direct replacement, required no flash. However going to a major intake or output change will require a flash.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
 

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According to the wrench I spoke with...a minor modification of the pipes require no flash. Changing the air intake to Dirty Bird's Stampede Series Arrowhead Air Cleaner, which is a direct replacement, required no flash. However going to a major intake or output change will require a flash.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
I think you just hit the nail on the head. "Major modification would qualify." I am retired " wrench" myself I have never done a recalibration for an exhaust modification if it was minor.
 

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None that I feel is necessary. Talked to an Indian wrench and was told he has not seen any need on any of the bikes with punched plugs. He said going to the S&S air cleaner or Stage 1 pipes is a different story.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
I talked to a rep at S & S and he said no adjustment was necessary, but HP and performance would be gained with a "flash". Sounds like the same deal with a Dirty Bird or a Thunder Mfg. AC.
 

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Last evening, when my wife returned from work, I was tinkering with my Chieftain. When I started it, she asked..."OK...what did you do to it. It is much louder than before." I guess my hearing is much worse than I thought. I am looking forward to the 8% improvement in fuel economy...if I can quit accelerating like an idiot!

Semper Fi,
DrZ
The increase in fuel mileage is compelling!

Do you feel any negative change in the low end torque?
Any shift of the torque band up the RPM range?

See, I've always believed that exhaust back pressure was necessary for low end torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
The increase in fuel mileage is compelling!

Do you feel any negative change in the low end torque?
Any shift of the torque band up the RPM range?

See, I've always believed that exhaust back pressure was necessary for low end torque.
She feels as strong on the low end as always however...I really believe she winds out longer. If that makes sense.

Semper Fi,
DrZ
 
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