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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I washed waxed and detailed my 2018 Vintage to get ready for some storage due to weather moving in.
I also decided to change the oil, since it was time. Warmed up the engine for a few minutes, shut it off and proceeded to change the oil. Starting with the low side plug, it was in there very tight. I had to use my heat gun to finally get it off. Then I went to the high side drain plug, and this one was in very, very tight. After trying the same process, the drain plug appeared to come free. However, it then would neither thread out, or tighten back up. The dealer was the last to change the oil one year ago.
So now I'm going to have to call the dealer in the morning to see if they can come trailer it in.
Do you think this will be covered under the warranty, or am I going to get hosed...by them saying I did something wrong...when actually THEY were the last to change the oil, and obviously very much over tighten the drain plugs. There was no crush washer under the plug I did get removed.

Any thoughts, please?
 

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Be persistent. Tell them that the one that came out had no crush washer and was a ***** to remove. With the miles on the bike, it should be a no brainer to draw the lines connecting the dots showing that they were the last to touch the bike. Make them pay for the toe

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Sorry to hear this... but it is just another sad tale of dealers allowing incompetent people to do their service work. Hopefully they will recognize responsibility and fix your problem properly. Timesert will take care of the technical repair on that plug boss. Big hassle, not a big deal to fix. Let us know how it comes out... especially naming them if they choose to shirk their responsibility.

Moral of the story: don't trust what goes on behind closed doors. If they lock up their service department from prying eyes, and it is your bike you want to observe... run for the nearest exit. It is perfectly normal for them to exclude customers from their work areas (for insurance reasons), but the better ones will provide good views into their service bays so that customers may readily observe what is going on.
Then after getting work done, it is a great idea to go over and inspect everything to be certain fasteners are all in place and all properly torqued etc.. It is perfectly human for a tech in a hurry to miss something... The better ones will not miss, and hopefully not be in a big hurry in the first place. Going over the job at the end is just good wise practice.
I have used personal inspection as one means of deciding who to do business with... I insist on seeing service bays as well as the demeanor and feel of the shop overall. I have walked away from more than one place that either prevented my access or gave me a bad feeling. The good ones will welcome your interaction.
 

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Sorry to hear this... but it is just another sad tale of dealers allowing incompetent people to do their service work. Hopefully they will recognize responsibility and fix your problem properly. Timesert will take care of the technical repair on that plug boss. Big hassle, not a big deal to fix. Let us know how it comes out... especially naming them if they choose to shirk their responsibility.

Moral of the story: don't trust what goes on behind closed doors. If they lock up their service department from prying eyes, and it is your bike you want to observe... run for the nearest exit. It is perfectly normal for them to exclude customers from their work areas (for insurance reasons), but the better ones will provide good views into their service bays so that customers may readily observe what is going on.
Then after getting work done, it is a great idea to go over and inspect everything to be certain fasteners are all in place and all properly torqued etc.. It is perfectly human for a tech in a hurry to miss something... The better ones will not miss, and hopefully not be in a big hurry in the first place. Going over the job at the end is just good wise practice.
I have used personal inspection as one means of deciding who to do business with... I insist on seeing service bays as well as the demeanor and feel of the shop overall. I have walked from more than one place that either prevented my access or gave me a bad feeling. The good ones will welcome your interaction.

I have seen some service ares look like a tornado hit. And I am "yea my bikes not going in there"
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry to hear this... but it is just another sad tale of dealers allowing incompetent people to do their service work. Hopefully they will recognize responsibility and fix your problem properly. Timesert will take care of the technical repair on that plug boss. Big hassle, not a big deal to fix. Let us know how it comes out... especially naming them if they choose to shirk their responsibility.

Moral of the story: don't trust what goes on behind closed doors. If they lock up their service department from prying eyes, and it is your bike you want to observe... run for the nearest exit. It is perfectly normal for them to exclude customers from their work areas (for insurance reasons), but the better ones will provide good views into their service bays so that customers may readily observe what is going on.
Then after getting work done, it is a great idea to go over and inspect everything to be certain fasteners are all in place and all properly torqued etc.. It is perfectly human for a tech in a hurry to miss something... The better ones will not miss, and hopefully not be in a big hurry in the first place. Going over the job at the end is just good wise practice.
I have used personal inspection as one means of deciding who to do business with... I insist on seeing service bays as well as the demeanor and feel of the shop overall. I have walked away from more than one place that either prevented my access or gave me a bad feeling. The good ones will welcome your interaction.
Thanks Gary .Do you know how to get the drain plug out if drain plug hole? If the dealer won't fix it on their dime, I'll go the Timesert route. I just don't know how to get the old pug out! Thanks
 

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Thanks Gary .Do you know how to get the drain plug out if drain plug hole? If the dealer won't fix it on their dime, I'll go the Timesert route. I just don't know how to get the old pug out! Thanks
Sure. It sounds like you have spun all the aluminum threads onto the plug and you might have to drill the plug. I would start by continuing to turn the plug while pulling downward with leverage or vise-grips or both. If she won't come out, then drill and tap it to get a large enough bolt into it to be able to pull harder. Bear in mind that the aluminum case is thin and vulnerable. Go at it in gradual steps. It would be possible to drill that plug completely out if it refuses to turn out of the case.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sure. It sounds like you have spun all the aluminum threads onto the plug and you might have to drill the plug. I would start by continuing to turn the plug while pulling downward with leverage or vise-grips or both. If she won't come out, then drill and tap it to get a large enough bolt into it to be able to pull harder. Bear in mind that the aluminum case is thin and vulnerable. Go at it in gradual steps. It would be possible to drill that plug completely out if it refuses to turn out of the case.

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Thanks!
 

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If you do need to drill it get a left hand drill bit, they come in many sizes. This will help spin the plug out. you might need to tap it and make a slap hammer with a length of threaded rod and some nuts, washers, and a heavy section of pipe. This should pull it out if the threads are indeed stripped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Another question...since the oil drain plugs are on the low side w kickstand down, how do I get a drill under there? I don't have any kind of lift available... probably a dumb question, but I'm not seeing how to do this.

Thanks for your help. I DO appreciate it!
 

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Another question...since the oil drain plugs are on the low side w kickstand down, how do I get a drill under there? I don't have any kind of lift available... probably a dumb question, but I'm not seeing how to do this.

Thanks for your help. I DO appreciate it!
You will need a lift to gain enough workspace under the bike...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Another question...since the oil drain plugs are on the low side w kickstand down, how do I get a drill under there? I don't have any kind of lift available... probably a dumb question, but I'm not seeing how to do this.

Thanks for your help. I DO appreciate it!
A 90 degree drill would probably work. I have a 90* Dewalt cordless that's come in handy for tight spaces more than once. Henry03 post #9 mentions a left hand drill bit, great idea!
 
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Sorry to hear this... but it is just another sad tale of dealers allowing incompetent people to do their service work. Hopefully they will recognize responsibility and fix your problem properly. Timesert will take care of the technical repair on that plug boss. Big hassle, not a big deal to fix. Let us know how it comes out... especially naming them if they choose to shirk their responsibility.

Moral of the story: don't trust what goes on behind closed doors. If they lock up their service department from prying eyes, and it is your bike you want to observe... run for the nearest exit. It is perfectly normal for them to exclude customers from their work areas (for insurance reasons), but the better ones will provide good views into their service bays so that customers may readily observe what is going on.
Then after getting work done, it is a great idea to go over and inspect everything to be certain fasteners are all in place and all properly torqued etc.. It is perfectly human for a tech in a hurry to miss something... The better ones will not miss, and hopefully not be in a big hurry in the first place. Going over the job at the end is just good wise practice.
I have used personal inspection as one means of deciding who to do business with... I insist on seeing service bays as well as the demeanor and feel of the shop overall. I have walked away from more than one place that either prevented my access or gave me a bad feeling. The good ones will welcome your interaction.
This plus 1. I have even helped the tech at my old dealer when he was working on my bike...
 

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Wish you the best of luck with this. Maybe the 108 will have “ man sized” oil drain plug because it’s far too common of a failure point on the 111. I had a VF 750 C years ago that had a secondary drain to let off a few ounces from the front cam bank, annoying for sure. Never stripped it but I was highly cognizant of the risk.
 

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Another question...since the oil drain plugs are on the low side w kickstand down, how do I get a drill under there? I don't have any kind of lift available... probably a dumb question, but I'm not seeing how to do this.

Thanks for your help. I DO appreciate it!
Right angle drill. Also, I would try to turn the plug while using a large screwdriver to push the plug down while turning, maybe even two screw drivers 180 degrees opposite and a friend to turn the plug. Lastly, dremel tool to the plug but I would lean on the dealer here, especially with no crush washers.
 
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