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2021 Indian Challenger Limited Blue Metallic
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When I had a 2017 RM, the plug head came off when I tightened it. A mechanic had to weld a stud to the threaded part to remove it. I had to put a sealant on the threads after to keep it from leaking. It is a poor design, way too thin for the application.
 

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German rider
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These values are fresh from the technical developer's table.
This means that these specifications are for dry, i.e. manufacturing light oil wet, threads
However, the reinstallation takes place after an oil change, where both thread sides are wet of oil.
This means that this torque can be far too much.

In later models, the oil pan thread was reinforced.
At my 2016 Chief I have installed bayonet - quick drain fasteners.
Something like Stahlbus or EZdrain etc. .
 

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I had to order a new oil drain plug after my dealer tech over torqued it and damaged the allen head socket in it. He did this at the 2500 miles oil change. After that I had an independent motorcycle service shop closer to home do the 5000 mile one, He had to pound the next size SAE Allen wrench into it to break it loose. Months later I got the new drain plug and I had the same guy do the 10,000 mile oil change. I gave him the 15 foot pounds spec to tighten it to. Now I have a good oil drain plug in my Challenger and might be finally able to do my own oil changes from here on.
 

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These values are fresh from the technical developer's table.
This means that these specifications are for dry, i.e. manufacturing light oil wet, threads
However, the reinstallation takes place after an oil change, where both thread sides are wet of oil.
This means that this torque can be far too much.

In later models, the oil pan thread was reinforced.
At my 2016 Chief I have installed bayonet - quick drain fasteners.
Something like Stahlbus or EZdrain etc. .
I have fuelmoto drains on all my 4 wheel vehicles, but, I wasn't sure about something sticking down an inch lower on the bike. I was/am worried about hitting something and busting it off.
 

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German rider
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I have fuelmoto drains on all my 4 wheel vehicles, but, I wasn't sure about something sticking down an inch lower on the bike. I was/am worried about hitting something and busting it off.
Here is a Theme I created to this issue.


Also by scrolling down you will find a Vimeo Video, to illustrate the hight.
There are some additional parts you will have to ripp off first before you may reach the valves.
But... you are right... sometimes the devil is a squirrel.
 

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These values are fresh from the technical developer's table.
This means that these specifications are for dry, i.e. manufacturing light oil wet, threads
However, the reinstallation takes place after an oil change, where both thread sides are wet of oil.
This means that this torque can be far too much.

In later models, the oil pan thread was reinforced.
At my 2016 Chief I have installed bayonet - quick drain fasteners.
Something like Stahlbus or EZdrain etc. .
I don't care if the torque is dry or not. The torque value most likely came from a standard sheer load torque chart if the engineer did not specify a specific torque on the drawing. It was likely a standard value for the thread size that was used. This is just an oil drain. 15 ft/lbs is just too much for a thin aluminum case drain plug. This is only for keeping oil from draining out not a load bearing member. This is 180 inch/lbs of torque on a course aluminum case thread and good luck getting all the oil off to do a dry torque. To seat the drain plug crush washer 90 to 95 inch/lbs is plenty. I've done that on my 15 RM since new and never had a problem. Been in aviation maintenance for over 30 years and a little common sense goes a long way.

These tech writers who put these manuals together are not mechanics. They simply go off of the drawings and notes that the engineers put on them. If the engineer on this put 15 ft/lbs on the drawing that person should have considered the wet torque that would have been applied. More likely the drawing did not have a torque listed in that drawing and the tech writer used a standard torque chart for the threads involved. Also, ft/lbs torque wrenches do not have fine enough increments to accurately put that precise of torque on that plug. That is why I use my 30-200 inch/lbs torque wrench on this plug when tightening. Way too many people have either stripped out the threads or damaged the plug trying to get this off. Dean
 

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I'm with you on that @Dean E
15lbs is too much. With some common sense this can also be done by "feel". The plug only has to fill a hole, not hold the entire engine together.
I agree that you can do this with a standard allen wrench (not the long allen wrenches). I caution about this simply to the fact that some will not have a good "feel" for what is enough. D
 

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All good info here, my bike is going to get its 4th oil change and first one done by me. I've been debating if I should use a torque wrench or not. I've been changing oil on my cars for 45 years and my previous two motorcycles and never used one. Granted they did not have an aluminum pan. I think I'm going with my first thought now and not use one and just make sure it's tight and not over crank it down.
 

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I had the same thing happen when I did my 500 mile initial oil change on my Chieftain #873 (which I bought from Barnett as it happens). The 1st plug came out and went back in nice and smooth. The 2nd took more effort to unscrew, and when I screwed it back in it just kept turning. I couldn't believe it, I worked as a motorcycle mechanic for years and I never stripped a drain plug. I got it back out (with some effort), laid the bike over on it's side on the crash bar and drilled and tapped the hole for an over-size plug from the auto parts store. I figured that Indian wasn't going to warranty a stripped plug, and maybe it was my mistake anyway (also I'm 5 hours from El Paso and was in the school machine shop when it happened). I've had no further problems on subsequent oil changes. Its very interesting to hear that others have had the same problem and I will let Barnett know about my experience.
--- Randall
[/QUOT
 

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I had the same thing happen when I did my 500 mile initial oil change on my Chieftain #873 (which I bought from Barnett as it happens). The 1st plug came out and went back in nice and smooth. The 2nd took more effort to unscrew, and when I screwed it back in it just kept turning. I couldn't believe it, I worked as a motorcycle mechanic for years and I never stripped a drain plug. I got it back out (with some effort), laid the bike over on it's side on the crash bar and drilled and tapped the hole for an over-size plug from the auto parts store. I figured that Indian wasn't going to warranty a stripped plug, and maybe it was my mistake anyway (also I'm 5 hours from El Paso and was in the school machine shop when it happened). I've had no further problems on subsequent oil changes. Its very interesting to hear that others have had the same problem and I will let Barnett know about my experience.
--- Randall
Wow the same happen to my 2014 Indian Chieftain to it twice to my Indian dealership, He put a Heli coil but no luck it started to leak again, Help Help I need help, just drop it of tonight back at the dealer I'm hoping he could put something better to fix this problem.
 

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Wow Randal the same happen to my 2014 Indian Chieftain to it twice to my Indian dealership, He put a Heli coil but no luck it started to leak again, Help Help I need help, just drop it of tonight back at the dealer I'm hoping he could put something better to fix this problem. Any thoughts Randal
 

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Wow Randal the same happen to my 2014 Indian Chieftain to it twice to my Indian dealership, He put a Heli coil but no luck it started to leak again, Help Help I need help, just drop it of tonight back at the dealer I'm hoping he could put something better to fix this problem. Any thoughts Randal
Please email me back with your thoughts at [email protected]
 

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Wow , something so simple as a drain plug seems to be an annoying little problem. I am not sure if I should do the first two oil changes myself or get the dealer to mess around with that. At least if they screw it up , you get warranty easier. Usually I find mechanic shops over torque bolts or tighten filters a$$ tighter than should be. That is annoying too!
 

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I just picked up my Chieftain on Tuesday from her 5000 mile service and was informed by Gregor at Barnett Indian that when they removed the second drain plug all of the threads came with it and the case needed to be repaired. Gregor told me that there is only about 3 1/2 threads that hold the drain plug in. This is the 9th Indian that this has happened to at Barnett, most of them on their first service mine was the 1st one they have seen happen on the second oil change. This is a $200.00 repair plus parts, Barnett drills out the case and installs a steel insert for a permanent repair, they have had a special jig made to insure that the case is drilled out straight. Indian will not accept this as a warranty claim they say it is the responsibility of the owner for any stripped out fasteners. Barnett did not charge me for the repair (Thank God) but Gregor did say that Mark Barnett is getting tired of eating these repairs and he did ask me to contact Indian customer service to see if I could get them to warranty their obvious defect in design. Hopefully I will be able to get them to do something about it, I do have a good relationship with customer service, they really helped me out when the A team in Vegas screwed up on delivery of my bike and charging me for accessories and not wanting to honor the due bill. I am very glad that I have the dealer do my services but I know a lot of guys do it themselves so I wanted to let everyone know about this issue especially since Indian does not want to do anything about it. I have posted the pictures Gregor gave me of the stripped out plug and the repair.
View attachment 1560 View attachment 1561 View attachment 1562
So how it is now did it work, my Indian dealer put a Heli coil on my and still leaking , what do you suggest
 

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Where did you pick them up on ?
The self-tapping over-size plug I got at the local auto parts store. If you run an online search for "oil drain plug repair kit" several options will show up. The topic has also been exhaustively discussed on this site. The main problem seems to be the relatively soft aluminum used in the Polaris crankcase castings combined with thin drain bosses and over-torquing the plugs. I use the Allen wrench that came with the bike with a neoprene o-ring, Loctite thread sealer, and just snug the plug down.
--- Randall
 
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