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Hello all fellow Indian riders,

need tricks or effectiveness to change my oil for first time, Please help with any suggestions or know how

Thank You
 

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Howdy,
The owner's manual gives clear instructions that are worth reading. Several owners, me included, have had one of the drain plugs strip when removing it for the initial oil change. It might be worth taking it to the dealer for the first oil change so that if one strips there is no question about whose fault it is.
--- Randall
 

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Yeah I have read through the manual and 4.5 qts run for 3 minutes add another 1qt for a total of 5.5 thinking to myself 5.5? where does 5.0 get me.... maybe in the middle of the hashes??? Good luck have a good torque wrench and take Randall's advice start working your own at 2500 miles.
 
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Yeah I have read through the manual and 4.5 qts run for 3 minutes add another 1qt for a total of 5.5 thinking to myself 5.5? where does 5.0 get me.... maybe in the middle of the hashes??? Good luck have a good torque wrench and take Randall's advice start working your own at 2500 miles.
I did my first oil change but was worried about overfilling. I have about a 1/3rd of a quart left (of the 5.5 in the kit) and was 3/4th up on the dipstick. I probably could have put more in buy why. Maybe after a thousand miles I will see if more is needed. Dean E
 

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Would also recommend a small torque wrench and be very careful when removing and reinserting the drain plugs, most notably the outter one. I let the dealer do first change and when I did the second the screw was difficult to remove and then just as difficult to reinsert. I got it back in, but the next time I do the change I'll also run a tap up through the hole to try and cleans up the threads. I think the dealer messed up the threads in the case and from my reading it happens a lot on these bikes. Other than that you'll probably only need 5qt of oil, that should bring the refill level to halfway between add and full.
 

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seen advice on a torque wrench any suggestions on such tool Thank you
Howdy,
The owner's manual calls for the drain plugs to be torqued to 15 ft. lbs.

Torque wrenches are available calibrated in foot lbs. and inch lbs. so be sure you get the right one. They are also available as micrometer-head, which "clicks" when you reach the torque setting its been adjusted for, and deflecting beam, with a scale marked on a plate and a pointer that indicates the torque as the beam deflects (bends) under pressure. Deflecting beam wrenches are less expensive but micrometer-head wrenches are more accurate and easier to use. Avoid using extensions with torque wrenches as they can can act as a torsion bar, twisting and giving an inaccurate reading.

Honestly, I prefer to use a short allen key such as is provided in the tool kit; I get a better feel for when the crush washer compresses. Snug and no more.

--- Randall
 

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seen advice on a torque wrench any suggestions on such tool Thank you
I would recommend an small inch/lbs wrench for up to 20 foot/lbs. There is 12 inch in a foot. The owner's manual calls for the drain plugs to be torqued to 15 ft. lbs. or 15*12= 180 inch/lbs. Anything over 20 foot/lbs get the larger.
 

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Howdy,
The owner's manual calls for the drain plugs to be torqued to 15 ft. lbs.

Torque wrenches are available calibrated in foot lbs. and inch lbs. so be sure you get the right one. They are also available as micrometer-head, which "clicks" when you reach the torque setting its been adjusted for, and deflecting beam, with a scale marked on a plate and a pointer that indicates the torque as the beam deflects (bends) under pressure. Deflecting beam wrenches are less expensive but micrometer-head wrenches are more accurate and easier to use. Avoid using extensions with torque wrenches as they can can act as a torsion bar, twisting and giving an inaccurate reading.

Honestly, I prefer to use a short allen key such as is provided in the tool kit; I get a better feel for when the crush washer compresses. Snug and no more.

--- Randall
I absolutely agree. After taking off the drain plugs and seeing what they are 15 foot lbs is way too much for those threads. A little grunt from a short allen wrench is more than enough to seat the crush washer. This is a drain plug not a load bearing application. My guess is someone who put the manual together pulled this value out of engineering chart for shear loads for the thread size of the plug. I can tell you from experience the people who put these manuals together and not the ones who go out and work on them. A little real world experience goes along way here. Dean E
 

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Comments like the ones you folks have all made on this topic are important. And will help get more Indain Motorcycles on the road. Eddie you are right it will become a Brotherhood!! Thanks..
 

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Being able to go um shit I don't know and have these guys to turn too reminds me of being a firefighter
 

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Howdy,
The owner's manual calls for the drain plugs to be torqued to 15 ft. lbs.

Torque wrenches are available calibrated in foot lbs. and inch lbs. so be sure you get the right one. They are also available as micrometer-head, which "clicks" when you reach the torque setting its been adjusted for, and deflecting beam, with a scale marked on a plate and a pointer that indicates the torque as the beam deflects (bends) under pressure. Deflecting beam wrenches are less expensive but micrometer-head wrenches are more accurate and easier to use. Avoid using extensions with torque wrenches as they can can act as a torsion bar, twisting and giving an inaccurate reading.

Honestly, I prefer to use a short allen key such as is provided in the tool kit; I get a better feel for when the crush washer compresses. Snug and no more.

--- Randall
I agree Randall. Being a retired auto technician (GM) when I used the torque wrench it felt like it was over torqued. I now use the allen key ...two finger method. No problems since.
 
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