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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, first time bike owner here. I bought a 2019 Scout Bobber and after reading a few threads hating on the stock Kendas and one that mentioned "wooden wheels are better than the stock Kendas" I would like to change out the tires to the Pirelli Night Dragons. I'm familiar with changing tires on the various cars I've owned - is it the same for motorcycles? The Bobber manual shows this as the Kendra specs:
  • Front Tire Type/Size Kenda K761 130/90-16 73H
  • Rear Tire Type/Size Kenda K761F 150/80-16 71H
So I should look for Pirelli Night Dragons with the same specs, correct?

Not to confuse the issue however what, if any, would be the biggest tire I could get on the front and back without making any other changes?

Thanks for your time.

Edit: Just wanted to say thank you for all your responses.
 

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180 is the largest on the rear but not all tires will work.

Avon cobras and Michellin commanders both have fitted successfully.
 

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Hello, first time bike owner here. I bought a 2019 Scout Bobber and after reading a few threads hating on the stock Kendas and one that mentioned "wooden wheels are better than the stock Kendas" I would like to change out the tires to the Pirelli Night Dragons. I'm familiar with changing tires on the various cars I've owned - is it the same for motorcycles? The Bobber manual shows this as the Kendra specs:
  • Front Tire Type/Size Kenda K761 130/90-16 73H
  • Rear Tire Type/Size Kenda K761F 150/80-16 71H
So I should look for Pirelli Night Dragons with the same specs, correct?

Not to confuse the issue however what, if any, would be the biggest tire I could get on the front and back without making any other changes?

Thanks for your time.
I thought the 19’s came with Pirelli on them, guess it just the regular scout. Changing the tires to Pirelli is the first thing I did and it helped the ride quality a good bit for me. I felt they did a much better job at absorbing imperfection in the road. The research I did said Pirelli offers the best traction in wet and dry conditions but it’s a softer compound so they don’t last as long. As a new rider I valued traction over longevity.


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I did this. You'll need motorcycle tire irons (3). Also, replace the valve stems with 90 degree offset jobs so you can fill/check air from the side. Also, get stick-on wheel weights. You'll need a 2-3' rod a bit smaller in diameter that the axel for balancing (static) or plan on having them spun-balanced (dynamic) someplace. If you balance yourself, make sure the rod is level in two dimensions (horizontally) so tire will settle to low spot naturally.. I used mild crates and wood wedges to level. I found the rear tire was almost impossible to get on... but got it eventually... huge PITA. Overall, not worth the effort: just take it in and pay to have it done. You'll also have to deal with belt tension and alignment (another cluster). It was fun, but major effort. If you're not a good mechanic and comfortable removing break calipers, etc. , don't attempt.
 

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tyre changes can be costly, but DIY + buying tyres on-line can save $$$$ depends on time + your wallet. i bought a decent table lift + should have been sooner. the more you do the easier they get IMO
 

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Hello, first time bike owner here. I bought a 2019 Scout Bobber and after reading a few threads hating on the stock Kendas and one that mentioned "wooden wheels are better than the stock Kendas" I would like to change out the tires to the Pirelli Night Dragons. I'm familiar with changing tires on the various cars I've owned - is it the same for motorcycles? The Bobber manual shows this as the Kendra specs:
  • Front Tire Type/Size Kenda K761 130/90-16 73H
  • Rear Tire Type/Size Kenda K761F 150/80-16 71H
So I should look for Pirelli Night Dragons with the same specs, correct?

Not to confuse the issue however what, if any, would be the biggest tire I could get on the front and back without making any other changes?

Thanks for your time.
Ripeart,
You can fit a 180/60 on the rear, but it's not recommended. The Scout Bobber wheels are 3.5" wide. The widest you should go would be a 160 (see link below). Going to a 180 will actually decrease your contact patch when cornering which will lead to some unpredictable behavior. Tire/Wheel Fitment

I just replaced the Kendas on my 2018 Bobber to Pirelli Night Dragons. I've not had the opportunity yet to hit the twisties (still need to break them in & waiting on warmer weather), but I'm sure the performance will be far better than the Kendas. I ride pretty aggressive and am looking for overall performance out of the new Pirelli tires. I really wanted to go with the 180/60, but after lots of research online decided the best & safest route was sticking to the stock 150/80.

Safe riding!
-Z
 

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Another note: Pay careful attention to spacer/bushings on the axles between wheel and frame. I don't know if they are all the same size, but better not to worry about that by keeping them laid out nicely so you are sure to get them all back in the same way.
 

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Hello, first time bike owner here. I bought a 2019 Scout Bobber and after reading a few threads hating on the stock Kendas and one that mentioned "wooden wheels are better than the stock Kendas" I would like to change out the tires to the Pirelli Night Dragons. I'm familiar with changing tires on the various cars I've owned - is it the same for motorcycles? The Bobber manual shows this as the Kendra specs:
  • Front Tire Type/Size Kenda K761 130/90-16 73H
  • Rear Tire Type/Size Kenda K761F 150/80-16 71H
So I should look for Pirelli Night Dragons with the same specs, correct?

Not to confuse the issue however what, if any, would be the biggest tire I could get on the front and back without making any other changes?

Thanks for your time.

Edit: Just wanted to say thank you for all your responses.
How many miles have you put on the Bobber? If you haven't put many miles on yet, and are just going by what people are saying in forums, you are just pissing money away. The Kendas aren't the best, but I have almost 6,000 on mine and they are pretty good. They do slip a little while cornering, especially when they are cold. but, they aren't the worst tires to ride on, either.
 

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I feel like I’m riding down a dirt road in Kendas. I can literally drift the Bobber with ease. About to upgrade to Metz ME 888s
 

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How many miles have you put on the Bobber? If you haven't put many miles on yet, and are just going by what people are saying in forums, you are just pissing money away. The Kendas aren't the best, but I have almost 6,000 on mine and they are pretty good. They do slip a little while cornering, especially when they are cold. but, they aren't the worst tires to ride on, either.
Indeed... Spend $100 on progressive fork springs and you'll notice a huge improvement (at least it did on my 2017... not sure what they're shipping these days). I did that and then put on the Michelin Commander II's which resulted in another huge handling improvement.
 

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As far as tire changing goes, look on U-tube for tire changing using heavy duty tie wraps. The hardest thing is breaking the bead loose. First let all air out by removing the valve stem core. again check U-tube for how to break the bead loose. Then slip 8-10 of the commercial wire ties 3/8” x 18” or 24” long (Harbor freight). Keep tightening these wire ties up untill the tire looks like a flat disc. It will come off pretty easy (IMO). Use same process to install the new tire. Check U-tube . Find several showing how to do this. Not responsible if you screw this up, or scratch your rim. Of course if you find a MC parts/supply store, many usually have a tire changing machine, and will do the tire change cheap if you buy the tires from them.
 

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Yes, there is a guy on these forums that posted a great video of all this. Very instructive and its good to have that ammunition before diving in. But its still a huge PITA. BTW, I used the tire irons laid on the edges of two leveled milk crates (level each crate and then also level between the two) to suspend the wheel with the (slightly smaller than axle) shaft (I think the actual axle is too short for this). This gives you two perfectly level rails for the wheel rotate on so that the wheel settles naturally to the heavy spot nicely. Use small offset and release method to see where the wheel wants to go. Offset from both directions to average out error. Distribute the weights so they're not all in one place. Also split the weights on opposite sides of the wheel. But this is all static balancing (worked well enough for me... in fact, one of the Michelins needed no weights at all!!!). The right way to do this is dynamically using a spin balancer machine. BTW, The Michelins are so well-built that they don't even mark them for valve positioning).

Addition: I broke the bead with wooden blocks of 2x4 and C-Clamps.
 

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Changing tires is a huge pain if you don't have a tire machine,had to break down and buy one.now I'm trying new ways,well new to me,to balance wheels.im used to spoke weights.i tried balancing beads.they are ok for car tires,but really suck for tubed mc tires.so last year I put the recommended amount of ride on ,liquid balancer and puncture protection.it was fine last summer,but now after sitting all winter,and having taken it out on the hwy in 40 degree weather,this front wheel vibrates like crazy,but only at 80 mph and over.any body else using ride on,and how is it working for you.how are you guys balancing your wheels?
 

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How many miles have you put on the Bobber? If you haven't put many miles on yet, and are just going by what people are saying in forums, you are just pissing money away. The Kendas aren't the best, but I have almost 6,000 on mine and they are pretty good. They do slip a little while cornering, especially when they are cold. but, they aren't the worst tires to ride on, either.
I have no problems with my Kenda's, but I live in Florida and have tpms sensors to watch the pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How many miles have you put on the Bobber? If you haven't put many miles on yet, and are just going by what people are saying in forums, you are just pissing money away. The Kendas aren't the best, but I have almost 6,000 on mine and they are pretty good. They do slip a little while cornering, especially when they are cold. but, they aren't the worst tires to ride on, either.
Just hit 500. Appreciate your advice.
 

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Front forks are different at 18 (cartridge I think). And should be better. @ripeart , take a look at the tire and make sure they’re not already night dragons as those were supposed to be the factory tire now. If not I got 3k use of my kendas before I trashed them. They’re meh tires. But I got the commander IIs instead of night dragons and do not like them. The night dragon is a far better tire. I’m looking at buying rims from an octane and putting sport bike tires on.
 

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Front forks are different at 18 (cartridge I think). And should be better. @ripeart , take a look at the tire and make sure they’re not already night dragons as those were supposed to be the factory tire now. If not I got 3k use of my kendas before I trashed them. They’re meh tires. But I got the commander IIs instead of night dragons and do not like them. The night dragon is a far better tire. I’m looking at buying rims from an octane and putting sport bike tires on.
That sounds amazing.

Which rims and tires?

I didnt know this was possible
 

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That sounds amazing.

Which rims and tires?

I didnt know this was possible
I was wrong on the sport bike tire part. The specs on the octane are 17” tire rear and 18” tire front. It’ll open other tire options but not the tires I was hoping for. You can google the tires octanes can use and see if it’s worth doing. Someone else on here has mentioned he has changed his to octane rims. I think it was @MOMZ but I’m not 100%.
 

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I was wrong on the sport bike tire part. The specs on the octane are 17” tire rear and 18” tire front. It’ll open other tire options but not the tires I was hoping for. You can google the tires octanes can use and see if it’s worth doing. Someone else on here has mentioned he has changed his to octane rims. I think it was @MOMZ but I’m not 100%.
Gotcha. Why the Octane wheels tho? Arent there a ton of aftermarket wheels you can put on this bike?

Ive been doing a ton of research on suspension stuff for this bike and soon will pull the trigger on a major overhaul with Nitron R3 on the rear and Andreani on the front.

My next thing will be tires and ive been wondering if there is a way to improve the handling of this bike even more by changing out the wheels and putting different tires. Im wondering if that will effect more than PND or Avon Cobras at stock size.
 

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I believe I said this earlier about my 2017 Scout69. When I switched out the "Kinda" tires for the Michelins, the difference was night and day. Way more planted and sure-footed... gives me more confidence in the bike. Also, the Michelins take road lines (patched crack between pavement lanes) like they were not even there. Also, when they tear off the top pavement layer prior to repaving (and leave it that way for weeks!!! girr!!!), the bike is not thrown around anymore like it was with the Kendras. Just saying.
 
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