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Well, looks like this Scout debacle has a name: Ken Pucel?
 

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On the one hand, this statement to investment analysts confirms the scuttlebutt we've heard here, that paint is the bottleneck. On the other hand, I have had no direct confirmation of that from Indian. The only news I get is scuttlebutt on this forum.

Look, just like investors, we have put our money down.

We are not the enemy.
 

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[ sarcasm] It's the Indian curse:eek:. The production facility in Iowa is built on a Indian burial ground (insert ghost sounds here). [more sarcasm]
 

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Saw that one also! There is another thread on here that sort of deflates that story...let's hope so anyways! It's entitled "A word from Indian motorcycles about our scouts".
 

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Well, looks like this Scout debacle has a name: Ken Pucel?
Well,maybe.
The article says:

"While extolling its financial gains, company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Scott Wine acknowledged that Polaris performed below expectations, particularly in implementing lean management principles. “Our 2014 results clearly put Polaris in the 'win' column, but our internal scorecard calls it an ugly win. We’ll take it, but we’ll do better,” he said.

The company hired Ken Pucel in October as its first executive vice president of operations, engineering and Lean. Pucel, who was hired from Boston Scientific, oversees logistics, supply chain operations and inventory, among other things."


Maybe, but top executives are to blame. When working, I was a Subject Matter Expert in Lean Six Sigma Principles (LSS) and a certified Master Black Belt in the methodology (doesn't mean a lot, just good at it). The problem I most often encountered was some good-intentioned executive believing s/he had the expertise in process engineering by virtue of taking an 8 hour class on Lean Manufacturing principles. The real heros of these efforts are the actual workers. Yet management does not want to let them be sequestered for 1-2 weeks with no outside interference - this is necessary . . , . no, a requirement, for a successful outcome of re-engineering the business process, whether manufacturing or transactional processes (like IT services).

Hiring someone who claims hands-on LSS accomplishments at the senior leadership level is questionable at best. How many CEO's or EVP's do you know that actually turn a wrench? The real problem may very well be in how the company leverages (and trusts) its Lean Management principles, not necessarily in the manufacturing line.

The methodology involves looking at a process (pre-assembly painting, for example), identifying the areas where no value is added to the product (waste in time, money, labor, etc.), and then eliminating that part of the process (but NOT the person's job). The difficult part is to validate the changes are realistic, reliable, and robust enough that the results can be repeated exactly, every time and by other people operating the same process. Also considered (or should have been) is system load - less production, more production. This takes highly trained facilitators (not familiar with the process), sequestering a group of hands-on players in a room for a week or longer, and, most importantly, having management support and champion the effort - meaning, accepting the changes. This builds faith in the employees and a willingness to do better and willingness to do it again. This also mandates that no employee's job is lost. Retraining and re-skilling, yes, but no lost job. Anything less will doom the project to failure.

I am sure Polaris/Indian has some kind of LSS program in their corporate structure. How it got implemented for new model roll out? Well, you all know the results.

For those still reading and whose eyes haven't glazed over, The Lean Six Sigma methodology evolved from Demming, Toyota, then Motorola and GE manufacturing processes. The latter two making HUGE success in turning their companies around, tripling stock prices, and earning large market share. Jack Welch (GE) became famous for this. It is also why Japan beat the pants off US auto makers - and continues to do so. It is also why Motorola has made some of the best, most secure mobile communication devices for years. GE's stock went from $45 a share to over $187 a share in 24 months.

The next BEST thing Polaris needs to do now is a Root Cause Analysis (RCA) - where and why did it fail? Some experts that I previously worked with got together and did a RCA on the cause for the Titanic sinking. Result, when all was said and done? The ship's lookout did not have a pair of available binoculars, which could have provided ample warning of the iceberg. Not the iceberg itself, not the ship structure, not the riveted steel or the water temp, etc. Binoculars! Whodda thunk it?

Let's just hope Polaris acquires ample Lessons Learned and better empowers it employees, and just not give lip service to the latest low-hanging fruit opportunities with poorly understood methodologies that executives often don't believe in.
 

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Well,maybe.
The article says:

"While extolling its financial gains, company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Scott Wine acknowledged that Polaris performed below expectations, particularly in implementing lean management principles. “Our 2014 results clearly put Polaris in the 'win' column, but our internal scorecard calls it an ugly win. We’ll take it, but we’ll do better,” he said.

The company hired Ken Pucel in October as its first executive vice president of operations, engineering and Lean. Pucel, who was hired from Boston Scientific, oversees logistics, supply chain operations and inventory, among other things."


Maybe, but top executives are to blame. When working, I was a Subject Matter Expert in Lean Six Sigma Principles (LSS) and a certified Master Black Belt in the methodology (doesn't mean a lot, just good at it). The problem I most often encountered was some good-intentioned executive believing s/he had the expertise in process engineering by virtue of taking an 8 hour class on Lean Manufacturing principles. The real heros of these efforts are the actual workers. Yet management does not want to let them be sequestered for 1-2 weeks with no outside interference - this is necessary . . , . no, a requirement, for a successful outcome of re-engineering the business process, whether manufacturing or transactional processes (like IT services).

Hiring someone who claims hands-on LSS accomplishments at the senior leadership level is questionable at best. How many CEO's or EVP's do you know that actually turn a wrench? The real problem may very well be in how the company leverages (and trusts) its Lean Management principles, not necessarily in the manufacturing line.

The methodology involves looking at a process (pre-assembly painting, for example), identifying the areas where no value is added to the product (waste in time, money, labor, etc.), and then eliminating that part of the process (but NOT the person's job). The difficult part is to validate the changes are realistic, reliable, and robust enough that the results can be repeated exactly, every time and by other people operating the same process. Also considered (or should have been) is system load - less production, more production. This takes highly trained facilitators (not familiar with the process), sequestering a group of hands-on players in a room for a week or longer, and, most importantly, having management support and champion the effort - meaning, accepting the changes. This builds faith in the employees and a willingness to do better and willingness to do it again. This also mandates that no employee's job is lost. Retraining and re-skilling, yes, but no lost job. Anything less will doom the project to failure.

I am sure Polaris/Indian has some kind of LSS program in their corporate structure. How it got implemented for new model roll out? Well, you all know the results.

For those still reading and whose eyes haven't glazed over, The Lean Six Sigma methodology evolved from Demming, Toyota, then Motorola and GE manufacturing processes. The latter two making HUGE success in turning their companies around, tripling stock prices, and earning large market share. Jack Welch (GE) became famous for this. It is also why Japan beat the pants off US auto makers - and continues to do so. It is also why Motorola has made some of the best, most secure mobile communication devices for years. GE's stock went from $45 a share to over $187 a share in 24 months.

The next BEST thing Polaris needs to do now is a Root Cause Analysis (RCA) - where and why did it fail? Some experts that I previously worked with got together and did a RCA on the cause for the Titanic sinking. Result, when all was said and done? The ship's lookout did not have a pair of available binoculars, which could have provided ample warning of the iceberg. Not the iceberg itself, not the ship structure, not the riveted steel or the water temp, etc. Binoculars! Whodda thunk it?

Let's just hope Polaris acquires ample Lessons Learned and better empowers it employees, and just not give lip service to the latest low-hanging fruit opportunities with poorly understood methodologies that executives often don't believe in.
Maybe a RCA could be seen here. Ref edited post
according to the Indian factory rep, the paint problems were coming from the tank vendor, who was pressure testing the tanks after paint. Apparently they are changing QC processes and are now pressure testing prior to paint, and they have a new state of the art paint line. This seems to make sense as to why the paint issues have been on the tanks vs. both tanks and fenders. There are a lot of smart people at Polaris, I am sure they will get the issues solved and take care of the folks who have issues.
 

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Interesting article. Thanks for sharing it. What I found most disconcerting is backorders won't be FULLY filled until the second quarter, which ends on the LAST DAY OF JUNE! I'm not waiting until JUNE!

Then it dawned on me... Polaris isn't talking becuase if they talked they'd have to be held accoutable to the truth. And if the truth is Scouts won't be here until June, imagine how many cancelled pre-orders there will be.
 

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The best option is probably for all the pre-order folks to cancel. I promise I would not feel happy about that causing me to get mine sooner. ;)
 

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Ken [Pucel]... is a knowledgeable and passionate consumer of Polaris products who currently owns eight Polaris vehicles, including a vintage Sno-Traveler." (From the company website announcing his hiring)

The same article also notes that he was hired in October, but actually started work in November. I actually find this encouraging in the same way I find it reassuring that he owns and operates the machinery that he is responsible for making. What all this makes me think is that Polaris saw this trouble brewing on the horizon and deliberately sought out the expertise it will take to move in the right direction. I've worked at senior levels of several organizations, and know from experience (some good, some not) that it takes more than a month to turn things around if you have a serious problem. The first and most critical thing though, is to recognize that you have a problem. The next most critical thing is to make sure you have the right talent working on the solution, and third is to give them enough breathing space to do the job right. In that spirit, I am officially holding my criticism in abeyance for now. If we are still having the same kinds of problems six months or a year from now, with no real signs of improvement, well, as we say in the fleet, "Red and Free" my friend. And that is my $0.02 worth.
 

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Interesting article. Thanks for sharing it. What I found most disconcerting is backorders won't be FULLY filled until the second quarter, which ends on the LAST DAY OF JUNE! I'm not waiting until JUNE!

Then it dawned on me... Polaris isn't talking becuase if they talked they'd have to be held accoutable to the truth. And if the truth is Scouts won't be here until June, imagine how many cancelled pre-orders there will be.
Curious, when did you order? If guys that ordered Sept./Oct. are looking at end of Feb. or early March, that's roughly 6 months. If you ordered in Dec. or Jan., and you get it in June, that's roughly 6 months. Apparently, for some, that looks like the lead time.
 

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Ken [Pucel]... is a knowledgeable and passionate consumer of Polaris products who currently owns eight Polaris vehicles, including a vintage Sno-Traveler." (From the company website announcing his hiring)

The same article also notes that he was hired in October, but actually started work in November. I actually find this encouraging in the same way I find it reassuring that he owns and operates the machinery that he is responsible for making. What all this makes me think is that Polaris saw this trouble brewing on the horizon and deliberately sought out the expertise it will take to move in the right direction. I've worked at senior levels of several organizations more than once, and if know from experience (some good, some not) that it takes more than a month to turn things around if you have a serious problem. The first and most critical thing though, is to recognize that you have a problem. The next most critical thing is to make sure you have the right talent working on the solution, and third is to give them enough breathing space to do the job right. In that spirit, I am officially holding my criticism in abeyance for now. If we are still having the same kinds of problems six months or a year from now, with no real signs of improvement, well, as we say in the fleet, "Red and Free" my friend. And that is my $0.02 worth.
Agreed. Two cents well played.
 

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Curious, when did you order? If guys that ordered Sept./Oct. are looking at end of Feb. or early March, that's roughly 6 months. If you ordered in Dec. or Jan., and you get it in June, that's roughly 6 months. Apparently, for some, that looks like the lead time.
What about those of us that ordered in August and still looking?
 

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If they do get their ducks in a row come spring when there gets to be a few on the road and in the northern states the test rides start, I think that the people that want a Scout could find themself waiting a lot longer than we have. The great majority bikers have not seen or have any idea about the Scout at this time, this could be a big deal in the spring, I could be wrong but I don't think so.
 

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Ken [Pucel]... is a knowledgeable and passionate consumer of Polaris products who currently owns eight Polaris vehicles, including a vintage Sno-Traveler." (From the company website announcing his hiring)

The same article also notes that he was hired in October, but actually started work in November. I actually find this encouraging in the same way I find it reassuring that he owns and operates the machinery that he is responsible for making. What all this makes me think is that Polaris saw this trouble brewing on the horizon and deliberately sought out the expertise it will take to move in the right direction. I've worked at senior levels of several organizations, and know from experience (some good, some not) that it takes more than a month to turn things around if you have a serious problem. The first and most critical thing though, is to recognize that you have a problem. The next most critical thing is to make sure you have the right talent working on the solution, and third is to give them enough breathing space to do the job right. In that spirit, I am officially holding my criticism in abeyance for now. If we are still having the same kinds of problems six months or a year from now, with no real signs of improvement, well, as we say in the fleet, "Red and Free" my friend. And that is my $0.02 worth.

JohnW.... You former Navy ?
 

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JohnW.... You former Navy ?
Still in the Navy. Started back in '84, said I'd quit when it stopped being fun or they threw me out. Getting close to the former these days...sailing a desk is not quite the same as liberty in the PI...
 
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Still in the Navy. Started back in '84, said I'd quit when it stopped being fun or they threw me out. Getting close to the former these days...sailing a desk is not quite the same as liberty in the PI...
It sounded like we might be speaking the same language. Hanging in the PI was fun, like the carousel bar in Thailand...
 

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If they do get their ducks in a row come spring when there gets to be a few on the road and in the northern states the test rides start, I think that the people that want a Scout could find themself waiting a lot longer than we have. The great majority bikers have not seen or have any idea about the Scout at this time, this could be a big deal in the spring, I could be wrong but I don't think so.
I'm not a dealer, but have to think that they will be enduring the anger and frustration of their customers for a lot longer than hoped. My dealer has described the current situation as a "plight"...BUT they handle multiple lines in the store and have a huge inventory of the major Japanese brands and several European brands that give their Scout customers (that cancel pre-orders) alternatives. I'm not sure other dealers will have that option to keep a customer...even if it's on another brand. I guess I have some empathy for the dealers in this mess...at least the good ones.
 

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I wish Indian had pushed off the Scout until Sturgis 2015, and then had them on site to purchase directly after the unveiling. They would have sold way too many on the spot if that had been the case. IF they come out with any other models of victory's, Indians or Slingshots, I will look, but, wait.
 
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