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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yesterday my wife were out for a leisurely dinner ride and stopped by a park as the restaurant was just across the street. We enjoyed a nice dinner at an outdoor table and we could enjoy the park across from us. There was a certain lack of on street parking, but we had scored a prime spot. These parking spaces are large and it is quite customary that motorcyclists share these spaces with other bikers. We don't care, just don't bump our bikes.

After we finished our dinner and dessert we walked back to our bikes. There we found another Scout rider attempting to back his bike against the curb. After assisting him, we greeted each other and he said that he could not believe that he was lucky enough to find a place to park, especially near other Indians.

He told us that he had just purchased his bike two days prior, and that it was his first real motorcycle. He told us about having minibikes as a child, and mopeds as a teen, but now a real motorcycle in his late twenties. He was beaming with pride, but also had some trepidation about his new toy. He was surprised to find that my wife also rode her own. He was even more surprised to find that my wife was also a certified motorcycle safety instructor. He said that he had never met a woman that rode or was even interested in bikes.

This conversation continued as we sat on a park bench and we found that he knew nothing about getting a license (MC endorsement) or the l laws of our state (MI) concerning motorcycles versus autos and insurance issues. But as the conversation went on, he said that he was somewhat disappointed in his bike because his bikes compass and thermometer were not working right (?). What.....I asked? He then said that his bikes digital compass only showed that the bike was going in an eastward direction no matter what way he turned, and the temperature did not jive with the temp readings on his phone or other signage.

I told him that the "E" stood for engine temperature. He said that could not be correct because he knew that it should be far warmer than 89 degrees. I explained that his temp readout was in Celsius, and that it was a metric measurement. Well that just set him off!!!

He said that he wanted a domestic motorcycle,.....not some "stupid import". I interjected and tried to explain that the bike has both Fahrenheit as well as Celsius and "MPH" and "KPH" readouts. Also that there was a trigger to toggle through the different modes.

He was absolutely amazed and astounded. My wife then reset his clock (he did not know that it had a clock), reset the temp readout to read in Fahrenheit and showed him the digital tach and that there were also emergency flashers and other features. I gave him my business card and invited him to our Monday bike night. ........Hope he can make it.

Its really a shame that motorcycles are sold without some after sale training. But it is shocking to me that people can purchase motorcycles with no proper safety training. And even those trained are no more qualified to ride in parking lots than on city streets. In the past year I've attended at least 5 or 6 funerals of motorcyclists. Everyone of them was a long term and experienced motorcyclist. Maybe the German or English systems of training and licensing would produce fewer motorcycle injuries and fatalities and bring down the cost of insurance.

Naw.....
The government would probably find a way to dumb down the training and further increase the cost of insurance.
 

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I blame some of his ignorance on the salesman. When I bought my limited my salesmen went thru everything to a point where I said hey thanks I gotta roll I’ll figure it out later. He said if anyone asks I explained it all it’s our job and you have to sign something that says we did.
 

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I still blame part of it on the salesman all the cars and motorcycles I’ve bought in my lifetime I don’t believe when taking delivery of any of them someone didn’t take the time to show me how things work . Now if you choose not to except any of that help or if it wasn’t given to you then I have To agree read the manual . Myself I am illiterate I just push buttons till shit starts happening it’s more fun like that
 

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Heres one,my other bike has a jockey shift on it,this guy comes in the bar and says,"whats that on the side of your bike?i know its not a parking brake".thats my gear shift."what,?where is the clutch?".its on my left foot.he said hes never heard of such a thing.he waited around to watch me leave.now that makes ya feel old.
 

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Seriously, read your owners manual kid! The only thing I would put on the salesman and the service department is they should have at least set the clock and put the bike in MPH and Fahrenheit.
 

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I had a horrible salesman. He spent maybe a minute explaining how to start my brand new Scout (2017)....that was it.
I asked him how to get the seat off, and he just said he wasn't sure. When I got home, I opened the plastic sleeve carrying the paperwork, took out the manual, and read it.
Oh,...I also noticed the PDI form was completely blank...nothing on it at all.
 
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Seriously, read your owners manual kid! The only thing I would put on the salesman and the service department is they should have at least set the clock and put the bike in MPH and Fahrenheit.
I would add adjusting the shocks to your weight and a fitting measurement.

When I bought my hog, they measured me and gave me a list of add ons that would help the fit. Didn't waste a bunch of money on trial and error.
 

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Dealer would not give me the keys before i showed him proof of insurance and a mc endorsement on my license. I have no idea if he was obligated to do that or not, but i feel like it was the responsible thing for him to do. Incidentally, the salesman also thought E was for east....
 

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When I bought my new Scout, the 'salesman' just handed me the key and paperwork and I was on my way. No owners manual was given to me but he did send me an email and a PDF file to read and print out. No key for the beautiful leather sidebags as he said they lost them. He didn't even go through the menu items with me at all.

They knew that the Scout was my 87 motorcycle in 56 years of riding so I guess they just assumed I knew everything and didn't need any assistance.

Oh well, live and learn.

Sam:)
 

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Heres one,my other bike has a jockey shift on it,this guy comes in the bar and says,"whats that on the side of your bike?i know its not a parking brake".thats my gear shift."what,?where is the clutch?".its on my left foot.he said hes never heard of such a thing.he waited around to watch me leave.now that makes ya feel old.
Heck, I’ve been riding for 38 years. My first two bikes were kick start and I’d STILL stick around to watch you take off. You just don’t see a suicide clutch that often anymore.
 

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Its really a shame that motorcycles are sold without some after sale training. But it is shocking to me that people can purchase motorcycles with no proper safety training. And even those trained are no more qualified to ride in parking lots than on city streets. In the past year I've attended at least 5 or 6 funerals of motorcyclists. Everyone of them was a long term and experienced motorcyclist. Maybe the German or English systems of training and licensing would produce fewer motorcycle injuries and fatalities and bring down the cost of insurance.
I think you answered your own question/statement. No matter how well trained it can still happen to ANY of us.
Ride safe, pray AND realize your vulnerability most of all.
Eyes wide open, head on a swivel.
 

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I bought my first bike used from a friend. She didn't have to show me much since it was a pretty straight forward bike without a lot of extras. Biggest thing was how to reset the tripometer since the gas gage was less than reliable.

While researching my first bike I was going to buy new, the salesman tried to tell me the controls for the tripometer and other displays were actually a cruise control. He obvious didn't know the bike at all. Ever since then I never relied on a salesman telling me about my bike. I've had a few who knew what they were talking about. But several had no clue. One of the bad things about buying from a dealer that sold more than one type of bike. Good thing about my dealership, the bad ones don't stick around long. Even so, I know more than most of them to.

I've also been in dealerships talking to other customers about bikes. Some have even thought I was a salesman and tried to buy a bike from me lol!

Yes the salesman should've done a better job. But IMO, the buyer should've as well. I don't trust anyone who will benefit from me buying something as the only source of information.

MSF course does a good job at showing the basics, but it really is just a start. When I completed my first MSF course the rider coach said "congratulations, you're all now PLRs, parking lot riders. And that is where five of you need to stay."
 

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While researching my first bike I was going to buy new, the salesman tried to tell me the controls for the tripometer and other displays were actually a cruise control. He obvious didn't know the bike at all. Ever since then I never relied on a salesman telling me about my bike. I've had a few who knew what they were talking about. But several had no clue. One of the bad things about buying from a dealer that sold more than one type of bike. Good thing about my dealership, the bad ones don't stick around long. Even so, I know more than most of them to."
I've seen this with new car salesmen in the last 10 or so years as well. The last 2 vehicles I've owned I bought new (08 Altima and 13 Tacoma) and neither salesman was able to tell me anything about them. It was annoying, and they only served as a middleman between me and the sales manager for the final price.
 

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After reading these posts, I'm feeling lucky that my dealership / salesmen went above and beyond to make sure I knew all about the bike before I left. Even now, when I stop in the dealership, they are asking how things are going and If I need help with anything.
 

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This is the end result of someone purchasing (or being allowed to) a brand new Kawasaki. He had never riden that type or model before. The salesmen ran his credit, filled out the paperwork and handed him the keys.
 

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The Indian dealership I bought my bike from pushed the Harley MSF course to everyone buying a bike. When I was there, they had just sold a bike to a guy who had never been on a bike before. He rode it around in the parking lot about 10 minutes before getting on the highway home. They were a bit worried and tried to talk him out of it, but he was a grown up and it was his bike, so what can they do, not sell a bike?

My dealership also went through everything on the bike with me when they delivered it to my house. Both bikes actually. I didn't want to ride either home from where I bought them, so they delivered them for free and walked me though every function on the bike before signing it over to me.
 

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Another example. But where does a salesman's responsibility end and personal responsibility accountability (of self or guardian of under legal age) begin.

Teen dies after his motorcycle collides with car in College Park

Teen dies after his motorcycle collides with car in College Park
by WJLA

Tuesday, September 3rd 2019

(MGN Online file photo) <p>{/p}

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (WJLA) — A teenager died after his motorcycle collided with a car over the weekend in College Park.

Prince George's County Police identified the victim as 17-year-old Oscar Hernandez.

On Sunday night, Hernandez was riding his motorcycle when he made an illegal U-turn into oncoming traffic, and drove onto the sidewalk as he traveled in the direction of Baltimore Avenue.

Authorities say an officer tried to initiate a traffic stop but Hernandez was speeding on his motorcycle. Moments later, the teen rode his vehicle into oncoming traffic and collided with the driver of a Hyundai who was trying to turn onto Baltimore Avenue.

Hernandez was transported to an area hospital where he died from his injuries. Police say the driver of the Hyundai was not injured.
 
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