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So with help from my HD riding friends I embarked on a new journey. After looking around at different bikes, I found myself moving towards a bike with a fairing and bags partially due to the looks and 100% for the functionality. Both my friends said that both will help for longer rides and give you a place to store things. Cant argue with their wisdom. So after looking at many used HD Street Glides, and Road Glides, I decided to check out the Indians. I immediately fell for the flake in the paint. I really love paint on these. Nothing wrong with a matt paint or glossy paint but for me it had to have flake. That narrowed the search down to a few and one was tops. The 2020 Chieftain Elite. Found a nicely kept used one with Stage 2 already done (Rinehart full exhaust, Indian Slip-Ons, High Flow intake and the Stage 2 cams/ throttle body) with low miles. I wasn't in the market for speed as this was my first but it was cheaper than new and pretty much hit all the buttons. Sadly one of the stipulations to buying my bike was saying goodbye to my 1965 Type 1 Resto-Modded Beetle. Truthfully I won't miss the synchronizing two Weber 48 IDF carbs, but the Mendeola coil-over suspension was crazy fun.

Already added the Roadmaster seat, TCMT Rear highway bars, Indian Toe Pegs/ Heel peg, Kuryaken Heel shift lever and purchased Indian grips to be added at my 2500 mile checkup.

Ive completed my MSF basic motorcycle course and just got my endorsement. Looking to attend the Motorman Riders training once I get the 1500 miles experience required. While its big and heavy, its more manageable than I expected, coming from years of road/ mountain bike riding. Its the slow stuff that has me taking my time. I tend to spend most of my time in empty parking lots and quite subdivision streets, honing my skills. Biggest problem is waiting for my jacket and helmet. Seems Covid slowed down a lot and no one locally carries my size unless I get it at HD (with a big HD logo).

Looking forward to learning a lot from the group and maybe see some of you out on the roads.

Only regret- Wished I started this journey sooner. My wife and I are heading to South Dakota in a week and would have loved to ride through those areas on my bike. Im not advanced enough to carry a passenger so Ill have to plan another trip in the future.

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Good looking ride and congrats. You won't be disappointed. The Indian's ride so nice with the adjustable suspension and cartridge fork. I say put your wife on the back and practice. South Dakota on an Indian motorcycle just feels right. And the scenery is breath taking...
 
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Nice ride. Very nice find! You saved yourself quite a bit of $$ by finding a stage two set up. One of the down sides to starting with that extra power is that going forward nothing else will satisfy you. 🚀 :giggle:

A suggestion RE: Motoman
I have his videos, which taught me a lot and helped my wife, who now has 24 whole months under her belt. You might want more than 1500 miles before taking his class. If you are practicing in the parking lots, invest in some foam insulation for pipes and some tie wraps for your crash bars. It will save them from getting skinned, if, or when, you dump the bike.

Welcome!
 

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Nice ride. Very nice find! You saved yourself quite a bit of $$ by finding a stage two set up. One of the down sides to starting with that extra power is that going forward nothing else will satisfy you. 🚀 :giggle:

A suggestion RE: Motoman
I have his videos, which taught me a lot and helped my wife, who now has 24 whole months under her belt. You might want more than 1500 miles before taking his class. If you are practicing in the parking lots, invest in some foam insulation for pipes and some tie wraps for your crash bars. It will save them from getting skinned, if, or when, you dump the bike.

Welcome!
I was reading up on his instructions and so far have about 410 miles, under my belt. I was able to purchase those road cones that MSF uses for 1.50 each and got enough to make small versions of his courses. He lays them out so you can measure off and set it up. I have an empty Walmart parking lot just down the road.

I see he aslo carries some plastic to wrap the crash bars. One guy on his site suggested old firehose. Said it was 10X the abrasion resistance.

So far Ive improved a lot. Still taking it easy and learning to deal with the cross winds on a fairing


Good looking ride and congrats. You won't be disappointed. The Indian's ride so nice with the adjustable suspension and cartridge fork. I say put your wife on the back and practice. South Dakota on an Indian motorcycle just feels right. And the scenery is breath taking...
Just got back and all I can say is WOW... That place is motorcycle heaven. Cant wait to return
 

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I see he aslo carries some plastic to wrap the crash bars. One guy on his site suggested old firehose. Said it was 10X the abrasion resistance.
Good idea. Most fire stations will give you a piece of old hose, if they have any.
 

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nice bike. don't rush riding 2-up.... it's worth getting a year under your belt without the added worry of another life.
Agreed! My wife has been riding 2 years this month . A couple of weeks ago we took a weekend trip with luggage. She commented "Wow. I don't know how you drive with me on the back. This is awkward." That was just a piece of 40lb luggage that did not wiggle. She mastered it pretty quickly but I noticed her slow maneuvering was very cautious.

Try loading some progressively heavier loads on back until you get used to the weight. Strap on a large bag of dogfood or bag of sand from Lowes. Than another and another.

YOUR confidence has to be greater than that of your passenger. Otherwise, they tend to wiggle and squirm until you wind up fighting the bike and get tired really fast. Getting comfortable with a passenger takes some time and can be really stressful. Take breaks often. Park on solid ground. Plant your feet solid when they mount/dismount.

Go practice.
 

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I've seen a lot of Motorman's videos on his YT channel. Lots of good info he and a couple others I like have, too. I have also been out practicing on my Roadmaster with low speed turning maneuvers and U turns. The friction zone is your friend. Ride safe and welcome from SE PA!
 
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Agreed! My wife has been riding 2 years this month . A couple of weeks ago we took a weekend trip with luggage. She commented "Wow. I don't know how you drive with me on the back. This is awkward." That was just a piece of 40lb luggage that did not wiggle. She mastered it pretty quickly but I noticed her slow maneuvering was very cautious.

Try loading some progressively heavier loads on back until you get used to the weight. Strap on a large bag of dogfood or bag of sand from Lowes. Than another and another.

YOUR confidence has to be greater than that of your passenger. Otherwise, they tend to wiggle and squirm until you wind up fighting the bike and get tired really fast. Getting comfortable with a passenger takes some time and can be really stressful. Take breaks often. Park on solid ground. Plant your feet solid when they mount/dismount.

Go practice.
I never thought about using dead weight to practice with. Great Idea. I just had her climb onto the bike while I held it steady and wondered how I can lift one leg to shift the gear into 1st. Lots to learn and I'm in no hurry to become a statistic. Besides, she actually was pretty fond of a Triumph Bobber at the dealership. Maybe I could just get her riding and forgo the whole thing all together. LOL
 

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So with help from my HD riding friends I embarked on a new journey. After looking around at different bikes, I found myself moving towards a bike with a fairing and bags partially due to the looks and 100% for the functionality. Both my friends said that both will help for longer rides and give you a place to store things. Cant argue with their wisdom. So after looking at many used HD Street Glides, and Road Glides, I decided to check out the Indians. I immediately fell for the flake in the paint. I really love paint on these. Nothing wrong with a matt paint or glossy paint but for me it had to have flake. That narrowed the search down to a few and one was tops. The 2020 Chieftain Elite. Found a nicely kept used one with Stage 2 already done (Rinehart full exhaust, Indian Slip-Ons, High Flow intake and the Stage 2 cams/ throttle body) with low miles. I wasn't in the market for speed as this was my first but it was cheaper than new and pretty much hit all the buttons. Sadly one of the stipulations to buying my bike was saying goodbye to my 1965 Type 1 Resto-Modded Beetle. Truthfully I won't miss the synchronizing two Weber 48 IDF carbs, but the Mendeola coil-over suspension was crazy fun.

Already added the Roadmaster seat, TCMT Rear highway bars, Indian Toe Pegs/ Heel peg, Kuryaken Heel shift lever and purchased Indian grips to be added at my 2500 mile checkup.

Ive completed my MSF basic motorcycle course and just got my endorsement. Looking to attend the Motorman Riders training once I get the 1500 miles experience required. While its big and heavy, its more manageable than I expected, coming from years of road/ mountain bike riding. Its the slow stuff that has me taking my time. I tend to spend most of my time in empty parking lots and quite subdivision streets, honing my skills. Biggest problem is waiting for my jacket and helmet. Seems Covid slowed down a lot and no one locally carries my size unless I get it at HD (with a big HD logo).

Looking forward to learning a lot from the group and maybe see some of you out on the roads.

Only regret- Wished I started this journey sooner. My wife and I are heading to South Dakota in a week and would have loved to ride through those areas on my bike. Im not advanced enough to carry a passenger so Ill have to plan another trip in the future.

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View attachment 593163
Hello Sir B a L,
Congrats from Texas. You're doing all the right things. I do recommend the "Ride like a Pro" class. Don't let anyone make you feel bad about being cautious. Being cautious will give you a safer and enjoyable ride whether its just you or two up!
 

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I never thought about using dead weight to practice with. Great Idea. I just had her climb onto the bike while I held it steady and wondered how I can lift one leg to shift the gear into 1st. Lots to learn and I'm in no hurry to become a statistic. Besides, she actually was pretty fond of a Triumph Bobber at the dealership. Maybe I could just get her riding and forgo the whole thing all together. LOL
The trick to that maneuver is to lean the bike against your right inner thigh while the right foot is firmly planted. It doesn't take much of a lean, just a slight shift of weight. Shift into gear, plant the left foot if needed, or just open the throttle and ease out on the clutch. Use the force,, errr friction zone.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Tomorrow I embark on a 272 cruise through Texas, from Houston, through San Houston Forest and over to College Station and back. Most roads are quiet backroads so it should be great.
Set up Motormans Slow slalom with my little cones. Sometimes I nailed it while others I simply got too slow. Trick I’m trying to master is the throttle partly open with friction zone and rear brake moderation. The good thing was after each pass, my u-turns were getting tighter and my confidence in not needing to drop my foot was improved. I did find my left hand starting to cramp so I’ve ordered a small grip exerciser so I can work on that too.
Thanks for the great advise.
 

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Tomorrow I embark on a 272 cruise through Texas, from Houston, through San Houston Forest and over to College Station and back. Most roads are quiet backroads so it should be great.
Set up Motormans Slow slalom with my little cones. Sometimes I nailed it while others I simply got too slow. Trick I’m trying to master is the throttle partly open with friction zone and rear brake moderation. The good thing was after each pass, my u-turns were getting tighter and my confidence in not needing to drop my foot was improved. I did find my left hand starting to cramp so I’ve ordered a small grip exerciser so I can work on that too.
Thanks for the great advise.
That's awesome to hear! I live in college station. Grew up in Houston :).
 
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