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According to the information published by the NHTSA, that around one percent of 616 units of the new 2020 Indian Challenger could be affected by the problem. Here are the details of this recall.

According to the defect notice, Indian mentions that on some Challengers, the engine output shaft bearing might not have been lubricated during assembly. This could potentially lead to the bearing malfunctioning and to a sudden decelaration which, in the most extreme cases, could cause a crash. According to Indian, should the vehicle present the flaw, it will do so at a very low mileage. The manufacturer explains that the motorcycles affected didn’t undergo a quality audit and were produced prior to the issue being flagged and fixed at the production level.

Indian recommends to owners of a 2020 Challenger with fewer than 50 miles on the odometer not to use their motorcycle. They should make arrangements to have the bike towed to a local Indian dealer where the bearing will be properly lubricated and any required fixes will be performed. Both the service and the vehicle’s transportation will be performed free of charge for the owner.

Owners of vehicles with more than 50 miles on the odometer can either submit an electronic form via a dedicated portal or they can have their dealer complete and send the form for them. No further action will be required of them. Internal reference number for this recall is I-20-20 and it began on April 3, 2020.

Should they have any questions or concerns, owners of the model affected are invited to contact the Indian Motorcycle customer service at 1-877-204-3697 to have their VIN verified. The NHTSA also offers a safety hotline service that can be reached 1-888-327-4236.


This explains a couple of posts of transmissions grenading.
 

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well 1% is 6 bikes, and one forum member already here had it happen to his sons bike. So now 5 or even less to go.
 

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I have read about a couple of tranny issues but "engine output" shaft could be something new.. It would interesting to know whether they are talking "crank" output shaft (what it sounds like) or the tranny output shaft bearing that supports the front pulley.. If its the crank output before the clutch and it seized, simply pulling in the clutch would keep the rear wheel from locking up.. Output shaft on the tranny could result in non-controllable rear wheel lock up..
 

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Quality control must have been on a brake”not good”
It’s a matter of following your work instructions. Companies put in a lot of procedures for quality control but it can’t cover them all. Lubing internals would be hard to check if it’s done properly or not.


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Founding member / aka Husky Davidson. 10/09/14
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Well seems like they could have tracked the serial numbers of the effected bikes. If it’s only 6 bikes then It must had been 1 operator that didn’t follow the assembly instructions....Or there were no assembly instructions for that step in the process...
Or just tribal knowledge. Which he didn’t have or....they found out the hard way because of a customers part failure.
Indian may be playing dumb for the sake of publicity damage control..

The engineers may of thought that the engine oil would had made its way to the bearing before it heated up and pieces welded together.
Unless the bearing is accessible from the outside, they would have to split the cases to inspect and replace.
 

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So what lubricates this particular bearing over the long term, like 50,000 miles later?
If it is the tranny output shaft we are speaking of, it appears to be part number 13 here: 2020 Indian CHALLENGER BASE/LIMITED (N20LCARR/N20LCBRR) Engine, Crankcase Bearings All Options | Cheap Cycle Parts
If I am correct, that particular bearing is probably not covered by the oil pump pressure system but is lubed by oil transfer from the tranny gear stacks moving oil.. It also appears to my untrained eyes that the cases would have to be split to replace it.. It's also hard to tell from the picture whether or not there is ample space for a mechanic to squirt some oil into the bearing to accomplish the pre-lubing that was missed.. It almost looks like there is so maybe pulling a seal from behind the front pulley would allow for a fairly easy recall procedure.. One thing for sure, if I were pulling it down splitting cases, I would double check the source/brand on the bearing to make sure it was not a Chinese re-label.. I would make sure I was replacing with a bearing from the good ol U.S.A. if it was.. All bearings are not created equal, in my opinion of course..
 

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If it is the tranny output shaft we are speaking of, it appears to be part number 13 here: 2020 Indian CHALLENGER BASE/LIMITED (N20LCARR/N20LCBRR) Engine, Crankcase Bearings All Options | Cheap Cycle Parts
If I am correct, that particular bearing is probably not covered by the oil pump pressure system but is lubed by oil transfer from the tranny gear stacks moving oil.. It also appears to my untrained eyes that the cases would have to be split to replace it.. It's also hard to tell from the picture whether or not there is ample space for a mechanic to squirt some oil into the bearing to accomplish the pre-lubing that was missed.. It almost looks like there is so maybe pulling a seal from behind the front pulley would allow for a fairly easy recall procedure.. One thing for sure, if I were pulling it down splitting cases, I would double check the source/brand on the bearing to make sure it was not a Chinese re-label.. I would make sure I was replacing with a bearing from the good ol U.S.A. if it was.. All bearings are not created equal, in my opinion of course..
Good points, just like any engine assembly the operator has to use assembly lube and sometimes people get lazy or hurried and just don’t put enough on it which might be the case also. In any case once it’s buttoned up it’s hard to catch.


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Founding member / aka Husky Davidson. 10/09/14
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If it is the tranny output shaft we are speaking of, it appears to be part number 13 here: 2020 Indian CHALLENGER BASE/LIMITED (N20LCARR/N20LCBRR) Engine, Crankcase Bearings All Options | Cheap Cycle Parts
If I am correct, that particular bearing is probably not covered by the oil pump pressure system but is lubed by oil transfer from the tranny gear stacks moving oil.. It also appears to my untrained eyes that the cases would have to be split to replace it.. It's also hard to tell from the picture whether or not there is ample space for a mechanic to squirt some oil into the bearing to accomplish the pre-lubing that was missed.. It almost looks like there is so maybe pulling a seal from behind the front pulley would allow for a fairly easy recall procedure.. One thing for sure, if I were pulling it down splitting cases, I would double check the source/brand on the bearing to make sure it was not a Chinese re-label.. I would make sure I was replacing with a bearing from the good ol U.S.A. if it was.. All bearings are not created equal, in my opinion of course..
I believe the assembly grease is just for the initial start up and run till oil flows to the part. The damage would already be done and oil would be present after a few minutes or a mile.
 

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According to the information published by the NHTSA, that around one percent of 616 units of the new 2020 Indian Challenger could be affected by the problem. Here are the details of this recall.

According to the defect notice, Indian mentions that on some Challengers, the engine output shaft bearing might not have been lubricated during assembly. This could potentially lead to the bearing malfunctioning and to a sudden decelaration which, in the most extreme cases, could cause a crash. According to Indian, should the vehicle present the flaw, it will do so at a very low mileage. The manufacturer explains that the motorcycles affected didn’t undergo a quality audit and were produced prior to the issue being flagged and fixed at the production level.

Indian recommends to owners of a 2020 Challenger with fewer than 50 miles on the odometer not to use their motorcycle. They should make arrangements to have the bike towed to a local Indian dealer where the bearing will be properly lubricated and any required fixes will be performed. Both the service and the vehicle’s transportation will be performed free of charge for the owner.

Owners of vehicles with more than 50 miles on the odometer can either submit an electronic form via a dedicated portal or they can have their dealer complete and send the form for them. No further action will be required of them. Internal reference number for this recall is I-20-20 and it began on April 3, 2020.

Should they have any questions or concerns, owners of the model affected are invited to contact the Indian Motorcycle customer service at 1-877-204-3697 to have their VIN verified. The NHTSA also offers a safety hotline service that can be reached 1-888-327-4236.


This explains a couple of posts of transmissions grenading.
"4 got 2 lubricate"??? this dude used to work 4 Harley???
 

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Bloody hell, yet another reason to hold off on buying a Challenger yet.
I think I'll leave buying mine till next year, maybe they would have got the bugs ironed out by then.
 

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Bloody hell, yet another reason to hold off on buying a Challenger yet.
I think I'll leave buying mine till next year, maybe they would have got the bugs ironed out by then.
That’s not an engineering flaw but someone not following their work instructions. It could happen on any engine.


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